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The great American film critic Manny Farber memorably declared space to be the most dramatic stylistic entity in the visual arts. He posited three primary types of space in fiction cinema: the field of the screen, the psychological space of the actor, and the area of experience and geography that the film covers. This book brings together five French directors who have established themselves as among the most exciting and significant working today: Bruno Dumont, Robert Guediguian, Laurent Cantet, Abdellatif Kechiche, and Claire Denis. It proposes that people think about cinematographic space in its many different forms simultaneously (screenspace, landscape, narrative space, soundscape, spectatorial space). Through a series of close and original readings of selected films, it posits a new 'space of the cinematic subject'. Dumont's attraction to real settings and locality suggests a commitment to realism. New forms and surfaces of spectatorship provoke new sensations and engender new kinds of perception, as well as new ways of understanding and feeling space. The book interrogates Guediguian's obsessive portrayal of one particular city, Marseilles. Entering into the spaces of work and non-work in Cantet's films, it asks what constitutes space and place within the contemporary field of social relations. The book also engages with cultural space as the site of social integration and metissage in the work of Kechiche, his dialogues with diasporic communities and highly contested urban locales. Denis's film work contains continually shifting points of passage between inside and outside, objective and subjective, in the restless flux.

Politics, mass society and the stadium
Robert W. Lewis

Front, the PCF, French Catholics and Vichy alike all paradoxically capitalised on the powerful connection between stadium space and bodily health to promote stadium-​based spectacle as a visible manifestation of political vitality and mass support. The stadium, in effect, gave politicians a vast spectator space that proved ideal for staging political rallies, political plays and even religious ceremonies that both rendered the crowd itself spectacular (something to be witnessed in its entirety) and that aspired to transform spectators into active participants. The

in The stadium century
James S. Williams

mapping its critical boundaries and lieux communs, the more the horizon of fixed or unifying knowledge withdraws. Cinematographic space above all, in its many different forms and guises (screenspace, landscape, diegetic space, soundscape, spectatorial space, etc.), is fluid and contingent, liminal and protean. Those films that work most the rich spatiotemporal seams of the cinematic field and extend the parameters of the frame are precisely those that most engage with – and enter into – cinematic space as an organic, multi-dimensional and multi-sensory experience, so

in Space and being in contemporary French cinema
Stadia, urban planning and the 1924 Olympics
Robert W. Lewis

, that the Stade Pershing and the Racing Club’s stadium at Colombes were perfectly adequate spectator spaces, as 30,000 to 40,000 people could attend international sporting events there. Léopold Bellan, a Radical Socialist from the second arrondissement, argued that the council ought to endorse measures that actually impacted French athletes and proposed spending one million francs on small sporting facilities in the Parisian basin. The municipal council ultimately rejected the COF’s proposal for a ten-​million-​franc contribution to a new stadium at the Parc des

in The stadium century
Luca Buvoli and the legacy of Futurism
Elisa Sai

and the language is hesitant and fragmented, the letters are collapsing, the colours spill over and inundate the borders.10 The posters have lost the power to excite the mind and heart of the spectator. Buvoli’s works alter the traditional function and physicality of the posters as they are not placed parallel to the wall but they often vertically emerge to occupy the spectatorial space. Through the displacement of the medium’s physicality, they abandon their traditional flat format and are granted a three-dimensional nature. The artist is not preoccupied with

in Back to the Futurists
Stadium sport and its spectators, 1900–60
Robert W. Lewis

The Parc thus became the most-​utilised large stadium in Paris, hosting weekly football matches for Racing Club or Stade Français and occasional Coupe de France matches, as well as regular outdoor track cycling races and the finish for the Tour de France and other road cycling events like Bordeaux–​Paris. The Vélodrome d’Hiver was also modernised in 1931 in an effort to function more effectively as a spectator space, at the impetus of an American entrepreneur named Jeff Dickson, who persuaded Jacques Goddet (by now the successor to his father) to revamp the arena in

in The stadium century
Space, sensation, and spectatorship in the films of Bruno Dumont
James S. Williams

ending poses a direct formal challenge to the viewer, forcing us to consider and interrogate directly the ethics of our gaze vis-à-vis Freddy. Yet does the act of montage also offer a way out of the formal bind of the reverse-field that seems to enchain not only the characters observing the landscape (and the viewer watching this happen), but also the landscape itself? Or does it merely replicate it? The question of exactly what type of natural space – and hence what type of spectatorial space – Dumont’s cinema ultimately envisions is explored further in L

in Space and being in contemporary French cinema
Abstract only
Grafting space and human relations in the trans-cinema of Claire Denis
James S. Williams

determinate, Martine Beugnet talks eloquently of ‘a cinema of the senses’ creating an interspace between the sensuous and cerebral, the tactile and the narrative (see Beugnet 2004 and 2007). Elena Del Rio argues for the films’ ‘kinaesthetic seductions’ due to their multi-sensory performance, exemplary, she claims, of Deleuze’s notion of cinema as a spiritual automatism and, more generally, of his philosophy of intense, ‘incorporeal’ materialism (see Del Rio 2003a and 2008: 148–77).4 Certainly, the Denis viewer is propelled into an intermediate spectatorial space that offers

in Space and being in contemporary French cinema