Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "speculative housing" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The development and design of the city 1660–1720

This book is about the making of London in the period 1660-1720. This period saw the beginnings of a new understanding of built form and a transitional stage in the transmission and articulation of that form in design procedures. The book discusses the processes and methods by which the development of the city was financed and organized. It considers the leading developers and questions to what extent the traditional model which attributes responsibility for the development of London to aristocratic landlords is a viable one. The book looks at the structure of the building industry and assesses how it was adapted to meet the demands of the production of speculative housing on a scale and at a pace never previously experienced. It outlines how concepts concerning the form of the new terraces were communicated and transmitted through the building chain and finally realized in the built product. The book focuses on the discipline of architectural history and is primarily concerned with architectural and urban design issues. It talks about drawings as the sum of an architect's oeuvre, rather than the buildings, or the drawings and the buildings together. The book provides information on the style and layout of the new developments and explores the extent to which they can be categorized as a 'modernizing' phenomenon.

Abstract only
Elizabeth McKellar

kinds of contracting and building organization. However, most smaller scale works, particularly housing, continued to be put up by small entrepreneurs operating through sub-contracting and the building lease system. A nineteenth-century speculative housing development would have been carried out in a fashion essentially the same as that of its late seventeenth-century precursors. The situation changed in the twentieth

in The birth of modern London
Abstract only
Constructing Classicism: architecture in an age of commerce
Elizabeth McKellar

city was financed and organized. It considers the leading developers and questions to what extent the traditional model which attributes responsibility for the development of London to aristocratic landlords is a viable one. It looks at the structure of the building industry and assesses how this was adapted to meet the demands of the production of speculative housing on a scale and at a pace never

in The birth of modern London
Abstract only
The builder rehabilitated?
Conor Lucey

: O’Donnell unequivocally responded to the prevailing tastes of New York’s real estate market.4 Nonetheless, while clearly informed by an emerging standardization in construction and materials production, by regulations instituted by private landowners and city councils and by the financial risks involved in running a business, the capital return from speculative housing was not the sole motivation of the eighteenth-​century house builder –​in other words, a concern with building economics did not necessarily preclude a concern with building aesthetics. By considering the tradesman

in Building reputations
Design through drawing
Elizabeth McKellar

the speculative housing market. There is some evidence in Chancery of drawings being used in connection with speculative developments. 15 From this and other published contemporary sources there is sufficient documentation for the London developments to suggest the kinds of drawings that were made, the purposes for which they were intended and the ways in which they

in The birth of modern London
Capitalism spiralling out of control
David Harvey

. When the speculative housing bubble burst, there was a foreclosure crisis on housing loans. A ‘fictitious demand’ had been created when sub-prime mortgage financing was offered to people who had very little creditworthiness. In 2007, property values collapsed in these regions and many people lost their homes (Harvey 2010). Abstract from the concrete 47 People who have been foreclosed upon and who are unemployed consume less. So the consumer market in the United States collapsed and many people lost their jobs. But the primary supplier to that consumer market was

in Western capitalism in transition
Abstract only
Stephanie Ward

topography (see Map of south Wales), the effects of which remain a matter of debate amongst historians and sociologists alike.47 The pattern of settlement created a market where speculative housing made economic sense.48 In comparison to most other industrial areas, the respectable worker in south Wales aimed to purchase their own home once married.49 While the effect of home ownership has traditionally been thought to have had a stabilising effect on the working class, Steven Thompson has revealed how this was not always the case. He concludes, ‘the political militancy of

in Unemployment and the state in Britain
Abstract only
A new apology for the builder
Conor Lucey

constituent element of house building within artisanal circles.10 Indeed, Joseph Moxon’s Mechanick exercises (1703), a guide for building tradesmen, confirms that ‘many Master Workmen’ in the early modern era routinely produced designs of their own volition, especially those 5 Introduction that understood ‘the Theorick part of Building, as well as the Practick’.11 But whereas the complex relationship between design and production in speculative housing markets has long been recognized –​in particular the economic and legal imperatives of the ground plan, the role of

in Building reputations
Abstract only
‘Good design’ and ‘bad design’
Deborah Sugg Ryan

associated with avant-garde patrons, by about 1933 when the market for speculative housing had reached saturation point in Britain. The style’s simplified form and construction appealed to them as a way to reduce costs, as well as appealing to marginal market groups.30 These developments were, on the whole, not very successful, and white-walled, flat-roofed houses of the Modern Movement were not popular with the English housebuying public.31 Flat roofs for sunbathing did not work in the English climate. White-painted outside walls became streaked from rain (as Lancaster

in Ideal homes, 1918–39
J. F. Merritt

on in Contempt of the said Orders, and the Commands of the Lords in Parliament therein expressed’. See also LJ, 6 Jan 1644; SL, XXIX, 26. 44 SL, XXIX, 2, 23. Sir John Danvers – a regicide and a Governor of the College and Almshouses – held the position jointly with his brother. 45 CSPD 1654, pp. 39, 311. 46 CSPD 1653–4, p. 397; See also R. Sherwood, The court of Oliver Cromwell (1977), pp. 16, 21–22. 196 Merritt_Westminster_Final.indd 196 22/07/2013 14:59 Fashionable society in ‘these our cloudy days’ The revival in poor-quality speculative housing is of

in Westminster 1640–60