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A spirited exchange 1760-1960
Editor: Avril Horner

The essays in this book demonstrate the importance of translation and European writing in the development of the Gothic novel. Cross-cultural exchanges occurred with the translation of novels by English writers into French. The book first situates works by British writers and American writers within a European context and legacy. Next, it offers readings of less-known works by Gothic authors. The book introduces the reader to a range of neglected, albeit influential, European Gothic texts which originated in Russian, Spanish, French and German. It argues that the level of ideological manipulation, which occurred as texts were translated, mistranslated, appropriated, misappropriated, altered and adapted from one language to another, was so considerable and so systematic that generic mutations were occasioned. The book suggests that Matthew Lewis's The Monk offers a few models of femininity, all deriving from and intended to disrupt, previous literary representations. It focuses on the automatic and the systematic in Charles Maturin's work in relation to Denis Diderot's contemporary philosophical conceptualizations of consciousness and identity. Gothic treacheries are dealt with through Samuel Coleridge's analysis of misappropriation of Friedrich Schiller's Die Rauber. The book also discusses the representations of ritual violence, as sanctioned by the Catholic Church, in English and Spanish pictorial and literary texts between 1796 and 1834. It talks about the Arabesque narrative technique of embedding tales within tales to create a maze in which even the storyteller becomes lost, reflecting the Eastern notion that the created is more important than the creator.

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European Gothic: A Spirited Exchange 1760-1960 seeks to challenge the tyranny of Anglo-American narratives of the Gothic. It offers a range of essays that demonstrate the importance of translation and European writing in the development of the Gothic novel, a vampire-like phenomenon that thrives on the blood of others. The volume thus charts the movement of Gothic

in European Gothic

. 35 Parkin, Alan Moore , p. 108. 36 Robert Miles, ‘Europhobia: The Catholic Other in Horace Walpole and Charles Maturin’, in European Gothic: A Spirited Exchange 1760–1960 , ed. Avril Horner (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002 ), pp. 84– 103 (p. 93

in Alan Moore and the Gothic Tradition

, he wrote to his fellow MP John Wilmot, with whom he had a number of spirited exchanges on slavery and abolition, regarding ‘the difficulty of getting the negroes to work, in their present state of civilization, by other than compulsory means’. 14 The other concentration of planters’ estates was in Scotland, which saw sixty-nine of the estate purchases (32.7 per cent), with nearly four in ten of those

in Country houses and the British Empire, 1700–1930
The age of consent in India

spirited exchanges among a variety of actors’. 130 My intention in rethinking relationships between Malabari and his English counterparts has been to reassess the balance of power between metropolitan and non-metropolitan journalists and campaigners, rather than to assert the significance of Malabari in any absolute sense. On the contrary, I would defer to other critics who have argued that within India the significance of Malabari has perhaps been overstated and that the role of others within the reform movement is due

in Sex, politics and empire
Scots in early modern Europe

. Mollat, Le commerce maritime normand a la fin dy Moyen Age: etude d’histoire economique et sociale (Paris, 1952), p. 508. 149 Talbott, Conflict, Commerce and Franco-Scottish Relations, p. 146. 150 H. de Bruyn Kops, A Spirited Exchange: The Wine and Brandy Trade between France and the Dutch Republic in its Atlantic Framework, 1600–1650 (Leiden, 2007), p. 56. 151 NRS RH9/5/5, 30 May 1603, Bordeaux. 152 19 January 1665, Register of the Privy Council of Scotland, 38 vols (Edinburgh, 1877–1970), 3rd series, vol. 2, p. 5. 153 Talbott, ‘“If it please god, I come home

in British and Irish diasporas

. 16 Robert Miles, ‘Europhobia: The Catholic Other in Horace Walpole and Charles Maturin’, in Avril Horner (ed.), European Gothic: A Spirited Exchange 1760–1960 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002 ), p. 93. 17 Miles, ‘Europhobia’, p. 93

in Dangerous bodies
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Carnivàle, Supernatural, and Millennium

and Charles Maturin,” in European Gothic: A Spirited Exchange 1760–1960 , ed. Avril Horner (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002 ), pp. 84–103; Patrick O’Malley, Catholicism, Sexual Deviance, and Victorian Gothic Culture (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006 ). 9 John Winthrop, “A model of

in Men with stakes
Rereading Melmoth the wanderer

Horner (ed.), European Gothic: a spirited exchange, 1769–1960 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002 ), p. 67. 24 Owenson, The missionary, p. 188. 25 Deirdre Lynch, ‘Domesticating fictions and nationalising women: Edmund Burke, property, and the reproduction of

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
Open Access (free)
Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction

. 137 Ibid . López Santos's term is ‘transferencia génerica’. 138 Terry Hale, ‘Translation in distress: cultural misappropriation and the construction of the gothic’, in Avril Horner (ed.), European gothic: a spirited exchange 1760–1960 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002), pp. 17

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829