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Across the early decades of the seventeenth century, Englishmen and women moved through a physical, social, and mental world organised into a carefully maintained balance of motion and pause. This book examines how seventeenth-century English architectural theorists and designers rethought the domestic built environment in terms of mobility, as motion became a dominant mode of articulating the world across discourses. These discourses encompassed philosophy, political theory, poetry, and geography. From mid-century, the house and estate that had evoked staccato rhythms became triggers for mental and physical motion-evoking travel beyond England's shores, displaying vistas, and showcasing changeable wall surfaces. The book sets in its cultural context a strand of historical analysis stretching back to the nineteenth century Heinrich Wolfflin. It brings together the art, architectural, and cultural historical strands of analysis by examining why seventeenth-century viewers expected to be put in motion and what the effects were of that motion. Vistas, potentially mobile wall surface, and changeable garden provided precisely the essential distraction that rearticulated social divisions and assured the ideal harmony. Alternately feared and praised early in the century for its unsettling unpredictability, motion became the most certain way of comprehending social interactions, language, time, and the buildings that filtered human experience. At the heart of this book is the malleable sensory viewer, tacitly assumed in early modern architectural theory and history whose inescapable responsiveness to surrounding stimuli guaranteed a dependable world from the seventeenth century.

Kimberley Skelton

more intimate family members, were welcomed in theatrical performances that established a staccato rhythm of Early seventeenth-century staccato boundaries alternating halt and advance. Staccato rhythm was even built into house and garden as entrance spaces expanded and compressed around the guest, axes of movement changed, and the regularity of the rectilinear house contrasted with the whimsically unpredictable garden. And poets as well as etiquette-manual authors transformed staccato pace into the rhetoric for describing the ideal estate and its social gatherings

in The paradox of body, building and motion in seventeenth-century England
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Kimberley Skelton

-women rethought the staccato rhythm of movement and pause on house and estate in terms of physical and mental travel. The invitation to travel in the house façade Upon approaching a house, English viewers expected security and stability – for instance, the measured rhythm of running their eyes across stone and then quickly halting at brilliantly reflective glass on the façade of Wollaton Hall (Figure 7). Yet at mid-century, they encountered first Italian and then Dutch façade templates that set them both physically and mentally in motion. In the early 1660s, those who

in The paradox of body, building and motion in seventeenth-century England
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Sean R. Mills

Manchester: Something rich and strange Feel – Sean R. Mills As the tram approaches Shudehill, you start to feel a change in the line. The smooth, low-intensity vibration begins to throb up through the soles of your shoes. With your fingertips, you can feel the different harmonics travelling through the metal, beating out a staccato rhythm of low-pitch pulses and high-pitch whines that travel through your skin, layering complexly like music. It builds to an astonishing intensity, and you step aside to watch the tram trundle past. As it slides away, the pattern of

in Manchester
Kimberley Skelton

inherent to early seventeenth-century staccato rhythms had vanished into a continuous blur. Already in the 1630s, postal and coach services linked regional towns so that people and news could travel more regularly. By 1635, there were regular postal deliveries between Oxford, Bristol, Colchester, and Norwich, and two years later in 1637, weekly stagecoaches travelled through the London environs as well as out to Cambridge.1 And beginning in the 1650s, Motion as mode of perception these networks expanded to include northern and western England as well as Scotland, for

in The paradox of body, building and motion in seventeenth-century England
Kimberley Skelton

had encountered the familiar staccato rhythm of movement and pause as they passed through the varying Skelton_Paradox.indd 128 17/12/2014 09:39 The disciplinary distraction of motion Isaac de Caus, Garden, Wilton, Wiltshire, 1632–6, from Isaac de Caus, Wilton Garden. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection. 129 53 environments of the garden. They halted sharply, for instance, between the areas of geometrically arranged plantings and the wilderness that simulated an untamed natural world. At Wilton, the Earl of Pembroke’s guests could not even see

in The paradox of body, building and motion in seventeenth-century England
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Something rich and strange

Manchester: Something rich and strange challenges us to see the quintessential post-industrial city in new ways. Bringing together twenty-three diverse writers and a wide range of photographs of Greater Manchester, it argues that how we see the city can have a powerful effect on its future – an urgent question given how quickly the urban core is being transformed. The book uses sixty different words to speak about the diversity of what we think of as Manchester – whether the chimneys of its old mills, the cobbles mostly hidden under the tarmac, the passages between terraces, or the everyday act of washing clothes in a laundrette. Unashamedly down to earth in its focus, this book makes the case for a renewed imaginative relationship that recognises and champions the fact that we’re all active in the making and unmaking of urban spaces.

Kimberley Skelton

simply, the definition of the Baroque is being in process. Everything in a Baroque world, according to Deleuze, was a sequence of events – from an object to the human mind; objects are composed not of individual points, whether atoms or dots, but rather folds that offer a continuous surface and so no opportunity to pause in a staccato rhythm of jumping from point to point. And these folds are perpetually changeable, constantly inviting the possibility of being folded and unfolded.29 The human mind itself is composed of folds and perceives the world through the process

in The paradox of body, building and motion in seventeenth-century England
Pat Barker, David Peace and the regional novel after empire
James Procter

texture of Peace’s fictional world, whether in a proto-modernist newsreel format, or in the use of journalists and media men at the level of content and character. As part of the very form of Peace’s novels, at points newspapers themselves become a vehicle of symbolic violence. Peace doesn’t stitch together journalistic and fictional segments but tends to leave them as open wounds for the reader to traverse and confront. The segmented structures he deploys present readers with a scarred and wounded surface driven by the staccato rhythms of a speech cast in the

in End of empire and the English novel since 1945
Ekphrasis and historical materiality in Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece
Rachel Eisendrath

line’s tripartite fragmented structure and staccato rhythm: ‘Time’s ruin, beauty’s wrack, and grim care’s reign.’ The stanza goes on then to describe Hecuba as the parts of a corpse (‘a body dead’): ‘Her cheeks with chaps and wrinkles were disguised’ evokes the aged, dried skin on her face, at the same time as the line also evokes her skull. Chaps are fissures, as well as jawbones (Hamlet refers to Yorick’s skull as ‘quite chapfallen’ (5.1.182)), and cheeks in the Middle Ages could similarly refer to jaws.38 Hecuba’s blood is also accounted for. Wanting its ‘spring

in Ekphrastic encounters