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The challenge of Eurasian security governance

Eurasian security governance has received increasing attention since 1989. The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, the institution that best served the security interests of the West in its competition with the Soviet Union, is now relatively ill-equipped resolve the threats emanating from Eurasia to the Atlantic system of security governance. This book investigates the important role played by identity politics in the shaping of the Eurasian security environment. It investigates both the state in post-Soviet Eurasia as the primary site of institutionalisation and the state's concerted international action in the sphere of security. This investigation requires a major caveat: state-centric approaches to security impose analytical costs by obscuring substate and transnational actors and processes. The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon marked the maturation of what had been described as the 'new terrorism'. Jervis has argued that the western system of security governance produced a security community that was contingent upon five necessary and sufficient conditions. The United States has made an effort to integrate China, Russia into the Atlantic security system via the Partnership for Peace (PfP) programme and the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council. The Black Sea Economic Cooperation has become engaged in disseminating security concerns in fields such as environment, energy and economy. If the end of the Cold War left America triumphant, Russia's new geopolitical hand seemed a terrible demotion. Successfully rebalancing the West and building a collaborative system with Russia, China, Europe and America probably requires more wisdom and skill from the world's leaders.

Douglas Blum

a major caveat: state-centric approaches to security impose analytical costs by obscuring substate and transnational actors and processes. In particular, state-centric conceptualisations are inadequate for grasping fully the decentralised aspects of control and organisation, because they overlook the social and discursive dimensions of these processes.3 While this approach is limited in theoretical depth and analytical scope, it is useful for the specific purpose of highlighting the state in its traditional Weberian form, as a uniquely privileged, central

in Limiting institutions?
Challenges and opportunities

This book explores the evolving African security paradigm in light of the multitude of diverse threats facing the continent and the international community today and in the decades ahead. It challenges current thinking and traditional security constructs as woefully inadequate to meet the real security concerns and needs of African governments in a globalized world. The continent has becoming increasingly integrated into an international security architecture, whereby Africans are just as vulnerable to threats emanating from outside the continent as they are from home-grown ones. Thus, Africa and what happens there, matters more than ever. Through an in-depth examination and analysis of the continent’s most pressing traditional and non-traditional security challenges—from failing states and identity and resource conflict to terrorism, health, and the environment—it provides a solid intellectual foundation, as well as practical examples of the complexities of the modern African security environment. Not only does it assess current progress at the local, regional, and international level in meeting these challenges, it also explores new strategies and tools for more effectively engaging Africans and the global community through the human security approach.

Place, space and discourse
Editors: and

Identity is often regarded as something that is possessed by individuals, states, and other agents. In this edited collection, identity is explored across a range of approaches and under-explored case studies with a view to making visible its fractured, contingent, and dynamic features. The book brings together themes of belonging and exclusion, identity formation and fragmentation. It also examines how identity functions in discourse, and the effects it produces, both materially and in ideational terms. Taking in case studies from Asia-Pacific, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America, the various chapters interrogate identity through formal governing mechanisms, popular culture and place. These studies demonstrate the complex and fluid nature of identity and identity practices, as well as implications for theorising identity.

Stephen Emerson
and
Hussein Solomon

clearly acknowledge past shortcomings of the modern African state and its limitations by seeking to cultivate a cooperative security culture through the African Union (AU), NGOs, and civil society to fashion an African security architecture for the twenty-first century. Without doubt many obstacles and challenges still remain, but these efforts are already proving useful in recasting the continent’s security priorities and, moreover, in establishing a direction for future engagement by Africans and non-Africans alike. The failure of the state-centric approach The modern

in African security in the twenty-first century
Lorenzo Gasbarri

General Assembly. 9 In one of the foundational decisions on the formation of customary international law, Military and Paramilitary Activities in and Against Nicaragua , the Court adopted a State-centric approach in dealing with the role of resolutions in the formation of customary law. 10 Moreover, in Legality of the Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons the Court considered that resolutions have value in providing evidence of emerging law. 11 More recently, in the Whaling case the Court considered that only resolutions ‘adopted by consensus or by a unanimous vote

in International organisations, non-State actors, and the formation of customary international law
Abstract only
Paul Sargent

culminating in the enactment of the Children Act 2001 and the establishment of a new ‘youth justice’ system. However, this simplistic or ‘whiggish’ version of history fails to capture the complex developments that resulted in the formation of the youth justice system. Utilising a ‘governmentality’ framework, this book seeks to unsettle the conditions of possibility that resulted in the emergence of the youth justice system. Rather than employing a state-­centred approach, this book disturbs the often progressive rhetoric that characterises much of the discourse on youth

in Wild Arabs and savages
Abstract only
Ipek Demir

expansions and retractions are erased. Nation-state centric approaches to diaspora multiply. Diaspora should instead be understood as inscribed and entangled in a series of historical and political processes associated with empire and expansion – including, of course, nationalist and ethno-political responses to these. Ethno-political struggles and diasporisation – that is, their spilling over into other

in Diaspora as translation and decolonisation
Stephen Emerson
and
Hussein Solomon

the evolution of a successful and secure Africa. They know it will not be an easy task as they confront entrenched authoritarian leaders and those who seek to usurp the democratic process and will of the people to maintain their grip on power at whatever the cost. The human security paradigm, and its widespread acceptance across the continent, echos this new thinking. It puts people first and develops security from within societies, and it is through this principle that the future of African security will be determined. To be effective the traditional state-centric

in African security in the twenty-first century
Abstract only
Stephen Emerson
and
Hussein Solomon

striking example of the pitfalls of state centric thinking is readily apparent when it comes to addressing the challenge of terrorism and extremist-inspired violence in Africa in the context of failing states. While widely acknowledged that long-term solutions to these problems require a broad-based societal approach that goes beyond governmental action to incorporate informal power structures and civil society engagement, the most common response by governments and their international allies is a state-centric approach that seeks to strengthen African militaries and the

in African security in the twenty-first century