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Roger Singleton-Turner

combine the tasks with those of the Vision Mixer, the Lighting Camera or Editor. ‘Shooting Directors’ (or ‘Shooter Directors’), for example, would work on location and record their own single-camera material. In general, and for studio productions, the Director might: approve the script, suggesting amendments where appropriate; in consultation with the Producer, make clear all the technical and design requirements for the project. In other words, he or she will ensure the project is properly planned . This includes approving the Designer’s plan, drafting or

in Cue and Cut
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Theatre plays on British television
Editors: Amanda Wrigley and John Wyver

In this edited collection, scholars use a variety of methodologies to explore the history of stage plays produced for British television between 1936 and the present. The volume opens with a substantial historical outline of the how plays originally written for the theatre were presented by BBC Television and the ITV companies as well as by independent producers and cultural organisations. Subsequent chapters analyse television adaptations of existing stage productions, including a 1937 presentation of a J. B. Priestley play by producer Basil Dean; work by companies including the Royal Shakespeare Company, Stoke-on-Trent’s Victoria Theatre and the Radical Alliance of Poets and Players; the verbatim dramas from the Tricycle Theatre and National Theatre of Scotland; and Mike Leigh’s comedy Abigail’s Party, originally staged for Hampstead Theatre and translated to the Play for Today strand in 1977. Broadcast television’s original productions of classic and contemporary drama are also considered in depth, with studies of television productions of plays by Jacobean dramatists John Webster and Thomas Middleton, and by Henrik Ibsen and Samuel Beckett. In addition, the volume offers a consideration of the contribution to television drama of the influential producer Cedric Messina who, between 1967 and 1977, oversaw BBC Television’s Play of the Month strand before initiating The BBC Television Shakespeare (1978–85); the engagement with television adaptations by modern editors of Shakespeare’s plays; and Granada Television’s eccentric experiment in 1969–70 of running The Stables Theatre Company as a producer for both stage and screen. Collectively, these chapters open up new areas of research for all those engaged in theatre, media and adaptation studies.

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Jonathan Bignell

studio production of Beckett’s television plays in this range of contexts. Some awareness of developments in television technology is needed in order to understand the significance of the television forms in Beckett’s television plays. Each of the plays was recorded in a studio, resulting in a high-quality videotape or film for later broadcast. There are few examples in existing scholarship that examine Beckett’s television plays in the light of their use of particular technical resources (see Homan 1992), though there are several analyses

in Beckett on screen
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Girls in the news
Peter William Evans

As Carol Reed began to make his way in films the British cinema in the 1930s was already characterised, on the one hand, by the rise of the documentary tradition epitomised by Grierson and Cavalcanti and, on the other, by popular genre-based, star-studded films and studio production headed by moghuls like Alexander Korda. Reed’s films, like those directed by Victor Saville, Alfred Hitchcock, Michael

in Carol Reed
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

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Richard Hewett

neglected, and given its commonalities with studio realism (rehearsal process, multi-​camera studio production –​but with the added ingredient of a live audience) and the more recent move towards a single camera model, this might provide some interesting contrasts and similarities. The particular styles employed for other dramatic formats such as the soap, the episodic drama and the single play also warrant investigation, and given the increased reliance in British drama schools upon Stanislavski –​so often confused with the ‘Method’ style of C o n cl us io n 241 241

in The changing spaces of television acting
Richard Hewett

i ng One live production to depart entirely from the studio realist model was Frankenstein’s Wedding (BBC, 2011), a re-​telling of Mary Shelley’s gothic novel that combined drama, musical and audience participation, and was broadcast in real time from Kirkstall Abbey in Leeds. Rather than being a traditional studio production, director Colin Teague’s cast and OB crew were required to perform a feat that was arguably closer in nature to a live concert. The production was subsequently nominated in the Sport and Live Event category at the British Academy Television

in The changing spaces of television acting
Marja Warehime

disparaged as bourgeois, aesthetes and snobs (Pialat 1979: 9). However, as Alain Bergala points out, rather than being elitist, the critics of Cahiers hoped to persuade the general public to think about film differently (Bergala 1998: 36). Godard celebrated the success of François Truffaut’s Les Quatre Cents Coups and Alain Resnais’ Hiroshima mon amour at the Cannes Film Festival in 1959 as the first steps towards victory over the ambitious studio productions – generally literary adaptations – that regularly won the prizes at Cannes, Venice and elsewhere. Truffaut

in Maurice Pialat
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The lessons of history
Jonathan Bignell

redemptive readings of popular texts (Brundson 1990) and celebrations of popular pleasure which had begun to mark a shift in television criticism from the late 1970s onwards. The complexity of Beckett’s role at the BBC is an index of much wider cultural debates within broadcasting and in the arts in general. So the changing emphases of Television Studies have reinforced the marginalisation of Beckett’s television work for three interconnected reasons. First, their strong authorial imprint, theatrical background and studio production associated

in Beckett on screen
Middleton’s tragedies on television, 1965–2009
Susanne Greenhalgh

—all dramaturgical elements that potentially pose challenges for successful television adaptation. As Sarah Cardwell ( 2014 ) has argued, adaptations of the same text can produce markedly different aesthetic effects resulting from the technological practices prevalent in different decades. As all but one of the adaptations are multi-camera studio productions, they particularly invite comparison of the ways in which script, setting and

in Screen plays