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A Critical Reassessment of Found Footage Horror

The aim of this article is twofold. On the one hand, it offers a survey of found footage horror since the turn of the millennium that begins with The Blair Witch Project (1999) and ends with Devils Due (2014). It identifies notable thematic strands and common formal characteristics in order to show that there is some sense of coherence in the finished look and feel of the films generally discussed under this rubric. On the other hand, the article seeks to reassess the popular misunderstanding that found footage constitutes a distinctive subgenre by repositioning it as a framing technique with specific narrative and stylistic effects.

Gothic Studies
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them himself, by refusing narrative embellishment or inappropriate stylistics. David Leland, who acted and wrote for Clarke, argued in the 1991 documentary Director – Alan Clarke (subsequently referred to as Director) that Clarke ‘brought compassion, humour and understanding to situations where other film-makers might simply expect us to hate’ and ‘worked obsessively to find a visual style for each of his productions so as to allow the viewer unimpeded access to the heart of the material’. If Clarke’s style were an anonymous, selfless articulation of these voices, it

in Alan Clarke

, confession, and Donne 197 doctrinal confession –​like literary profession –​forms a ‘stylistics of existence’, rather than subjection.4 Seeing the divided body of Christ Why Foucault now? Over the past decade and a half, the various ‘turns’ to religion have marked a turn away from Foucault, and from the discourses of power and religious authority imported from his work by new historicism. Drawing upon recent historiography, this turn has highlighted several basic yet important truths:  that confessional formation was a multifarious, even haphazard affair in the early

in Forms of faith
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Investigating British television police series

You’re nicked is a genre study of police series produced by UK television from 1955 to the 2010s. It considers how the relationship among production practices, visual stylistics, and resultant ideology has evolved over the past sixty years, and how this has had an impact on changing cultural definitions of the police series genre.

To chart the development of the genre each chapter focuses on a particular decade to examine how key series represent the changes that gendered identities and social-class demographics were experiencing economically, socially, and politically in light of the disassembly of the postwar settlement. Depictions of the police station, domestic scenes of criminals, and the private lives of police officials are examined to unearth the complex ideology underpinning each series and to determine how the police series genre can be used to document socio-economic changes to British society.

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Looking to the past

This chapter explores how Waking the Dead (BBC, 2000–2011), New Tricks (BBC, 2003–2015), and Life on Mars (BBC, 2006–2007) use digital stylistics to engage with nostalgia and the iconology of sci-fi. It examines how each series provides differing views as to how technological innovations can be balanced effectively with traditional methods of detection to combat crime and maintain a stable society. The chapter then considers how each series explores the impact that the internet and associated surveillance technologies had on civilian life, given increased postmodern awareness that a person’s identity can be fragmentary, temporary, and contingent over time.

in You’re nicked
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Transitioning from film to digital

This chapter examines Prime Suspect (ITV, 1991–2006), A Touch of Frost (ITV, 1992–2010), and Cracker (ITV, 1993–2006). Each programme utilises the visual iconography of the horror film to capture a rising dissatisfaction with the criminal justice system’s continued adoption of rational-actor policy. Then, the chapter explores how each series uses horror-film stylistics to depict perceived threats to society, including the underclass of Prime Suspect, middle-class femininity in Frost, and Cracker’s working-class ‘masculinity in crisis’. Lastly, an examination of The Cops (BBC, 1998–2001) determines how digital, handheld cameras combine docudrama’s emotional realism with the ‘horizontality’ of contemporary social realism to embody the precariousness and existentialism of Anthony Giddens’s ‘new individualism’, whilst critiquing New Labour’s adoption of ‘left realism’ criminology.

in You’re nicked
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are melodramas and he had recourse to music, painting, opera and the novel of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a fin de siècle romantic, nostalgic melancholy of emotional staging. Modernism tends to be interested in a renewal and transformation of what has been and primarily by work on stylistics and form. For Visconti, what is primary is content not form in the sense that his formal procedures are dictated by a content to be expressed in a performance and a spectacle given to him in a pre-existing text that he stages. Whereas modernist films

in Film modernism

they have very effectively polarised Zimbabwean politics and marginalised opposition political parties, NGOs and human rights organisations in the last decade and, at the same time, demonstrate and remind Zimbabweans of 116 Joost Fontein their own capacities for violence. In this way the exhumations can be understood as part and parcel of ZANU-PF’s performative stylistics of power. Yet ultimately the uncontained uncertainties about the identities of the dead, and the manner of their deaths, in part provoked by the indeterminate nature of the human materials, were

in Governing the dead

they have very effectively polarised Zimbabwean politics and marginalised opposition political parties, NGOs and human rights organisations in the last decade and, at the same time, demonstrate and remind Zimbabweans of 116 Joost Fontein their own capacities for violence. In this way the exhumations can be understood as part and parcel of ZANU-PF’s performative stylistics of power. Yet ultimately the uncontained uncertainties about the identities of the dead, and the manner of their deaths, in part provoked by the indeterminate nature of the human materials, were

in Governing the dead
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Theory of the novel and the eccentric novel’s early play with theory

convention or historical norms can be read as failed fictions. Or they can generate new theories of fiction. It is by attending to the range of Machado de Assis’s language and literary structures that Schwarz’s study of Brazilian literature redefines the relation between the social and literary. Similarly, Dostoevsky’s work compels Bakhtin to call for a ‘sociological stylistics’. This must be an especially complex 6 John Gledson, ‘Introduction’, in Roberto Schwarz, A Master on the Periphery of Capitalism (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001), xxi. Lubkemann Allen

in EccentriCities