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British policies, practices and representations of naval coercion

The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade has puzzled nineteenth-century contemporaries and historians. The British Empire turned naval power and moral outrage against a branch of commerce it had done so much to promote. This book deals with the British Royal Navy's suppression of the Atlantic slave trade. It traces the political debates which framed policies for the British state's waning but unbroken commitment to slave-trade suppression. If protectionists failed to stop free trade and anti-coercionists failed to withdraw the cruisers, then they did both succeed in reshaping domestic debates to support labour coercion. The book examines details of the work of the navy's West Africa Squadron which have been passed over in earlier narrative accounts. The liberty afforded to the individuals who entered as apprentices into Sierra Leone cannot be clearly distinguished from the bonded labour awaiting them had their enslavers completed the voyage to the Americas. The experiences of sailors and Africans ashore and on ship often stand in contrast to contemporaneous representations of naval suppression. Comparison of the health of African and European sailors serving on the West Africa Station provides insight into the degree to which naval medicine was racialised. The book discusses the anti-slave trade squadron's wider, cultural significance, and its role in the shaping of geographical knowledge of West Africa. It charts the ways in which slave-trade suppression in the Atlantic Ocean was represented in material culture, and the legacy of this commemoration for historical writing and public memory in the subsequent 200 years.

Richard Huzzey

British suppression of the transatlantic slave trade rested on the threat of violent force. However, the use and exertion of naval power was shaped or constrained by political calculation. In considering the national and international politics of the maritime campaign, this chapter seeks to understand how the two interacted and, in particular

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade
Abolition from ship to shore
Robert Burroughs

This study provides fresh perspectives on critical aspects of the British Royal Navy’s suppression of the Atlantic slave trade. It is divided into three sections. The first, Policies, presents a new interpretation of the political framework under which slave-trade suppression was executed. Part II, Practices, examines details of the work of the navy’s West Africa Squadron

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade
Richard Huzzey
and
John McAleer

played by the navy in promulgating Britain’s nineteenth-century anti-slavery policies. But by virtue of the fact that the envelope contains all that remains of the Black Joke , it also acts as a potent symbol of the way in which much of the rest of the navy’s suppression activities off the west coast of Africa in the first half of the nineteenth century fell from the public gaze

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade
Robert Burroughs

Introduction With the culmination of the West Indian emancipation movement in 1838, politicians and anti-slavery leaders turned their attention increasingly to slave-trade suppression. 1 Public interest in, if not support for, the cause was roused, as from the late 1830s until the early 1850s – especially in the 1840s when its

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade
David Lambert

Introduction This chapter considers the role of British naval suppression in the production of the image of West Africa. 1 The published accounts produced by naval officers serving in the West Africa Squadron, or others who travelled on its ships, were not primarily intended to add to British understanding of West Africa and its

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade
Tommy Dickinson

1 Oppression and suppression of the sexual deviant, 1939–1967 I would sometimes question the treatments we were giving. [. . .] Then I would get home and turn on the television [. . .] and all over it was either ‘homosexuals should be accepted’, or ‘homosexuality is illegal, it is wrong, these people are irredeemable.’ And thank goodness; ‘psychiatry is trying to do something about it.’ [. . .] I just didn’t know who was right and what was wrong, it left me very perplexed.1 Introduction Nurses caring for patients receiving treatments for sexual deviations

in ‘Curing queers’
Martin Heale

involved the anomalous alien priories, closed because of their dependence on French monasteries. The suppression of small houses did become a little more common from the late fifteenth century, and a more far-reaching dissolution of lesser houses was under discussion in early Tudor England (cf. 55 ). But despite their rarity, new foundations and suppressions reveal much about late

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
What Lessons Can Be Drawn from Case Studies in France, the United States and Madagascar?
Hugo Carnell

communities of Martigues and Toulon by late 1720 ( Devaux, 2013 : 178–9). Plague deaths in Marseille eventually peaked at more than a thousand people per day in September 1720, but this dropped rapidly to around fifty per day by November. After the almost total suppression of the disease by the end of 1721, virtually all restrictions were lifted on Marseille ( Signoli and Tzortzis, 2018 : 219, 224). However, a smaller outbreak which started in May 1722 forced the re

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Kitty S. Millet

This article has two aims: to examine the effects of victim proximity to crematoria ashes and ash pits both consciously and unconsciously in a subset of Holocaust survivors, those who were incarcerated at the dedicated death camps of Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka, as well as Auschwitz-Birkenau; and to contrast these effects, the subject positions they produce, with their suppression as the basis both for a strategy of survival during incarceration and for a reimagined identity after the war. Within a cohort of four survivors from Rudolf Reder (Belzec), Esther Raab (Sobibor), Jacob Wiernik (Treblinka) and Shlomo Venezia (Auschwitz), I trace the ways in which discrete memories and senses became constitutive in the formation of the subject prior to and after escape – the experience of liberation – so that essentially two kinds of subjects became visible, the subject in liberation and the subject of ashes. In conjunction with these two kinds of subjects, I introduce the compensatory notion of a third path suggested both by H. G. Adler and Anna Orenstein, also Holocaust survivors, that holds both positions together in one space, the space of literature, preventing the two positions from being stranded in dialectical opposition to each other.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal