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Anne Quéma

The article analyzes the relationship between social laws and the self in Gothic fiction, and argues that contemporary English Gothic fiction enacts the way subjects adhere to social practices and structures. In this scenario, characters are monsters of social conformity and docility. On this basis, Susan Hill‘s The Mist in the Mirror and The Woman in Black can be interpreted as critiques of the masculine quest for identity by means of adherence to the family as institution and habitus. The novels represent this process of ideological adherence by creating a dehistoricized plot and setting haunted by a ghost exerting what Bourdieu calls symbolic violence on the protagonists, and from which women have been absented.

Gothic Studies
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Diplomatic embarrassment and European democratic identity
Emmanuel-Pierre Guittet

The scandal surrounding GAL exposed deep-rooted problems in Spain’s security and counter-terrorist structures, which were eagerly exploited by the opposition in Madrid and by Basque nationalist groups and parties. It became not only a political embarrassment for the Spanish socialist government but also a diplomatic issue with France. Spain has always been strongly determined to develop EU-wide procedures capable of proving effective in the ongoing struggle against ETA in particular and terrorism in general. What this chapter suggests is that, in choosing to go even further in its demands for stronger and swifter mechanisms of police and judicial co-operation among its European peers, Spain found itself a convenient veil behind which GAL’s operations could be hidden and their political and diplomatic consequences rewritten. In promoting greater pan-European co-operation in the fight against terrorism as a collective democratic expression, Spain succeeded in drastically reducing the potentially disastrous impact of the GAL affair as a source of embarrassment.

in Counter-terror by proxy
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A blended ethnography of a migrant city

Based on several years of ethnographic fieldwork, French London provides rare insights into the everyday lived experience of a diverse group of French citizens who have chosen to make London home. From sixth-form students to an octogenarian divorcee, hospitality to hospital staff, and second-generation onward migrants to returnees, the individual trajectories described are disparate but connected by a ‘common-unity’ of practice. Despite most not self-identifying with a ‘community’ identity, this heterogenous migrant group are shown to share many homemaking characteristics and to enact their belonging in common ways. Whether through the contents of their kitchens, their reasons for migrating to London or their evolving attitudes to education and healthcare, participants are seen to embody a distinct form of London-Frenchness. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu’s theories of ‘symbolic violence’ and ‘habitus’, inventively deconstructed into its component parts of habitat, habituation and habits, the book reveals how structural forces in France and early encounters with ‘otherness’ underpin mobility, and how long-term settlement is performed as a pre-reflexive process. It deploys an original blended ethnographic lens to understand the intersection between the on-land and online in contemporary mobility, providing a rich description of migrants’ material and digital habitats. With ‘Brexit’ on the horizon and participants subsequently revisited in a post-referendum Epilogue, the monograph demonstrates the appeal of London prior to 2016 and the disruption to the migrants’ identity and belonging since. It offers an unprecedented window onto the intimate lifeworlds of an under-researched diaspora at a crucial point in Britain’s history.

Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

attention has been paid so far to the ‘gift’ element of data production and its implications for how we think about the nature of aid, participation and accountability. In The Gift Marel Mauss explored how reciprocal exchanges of objects between groups build relationships between humans ( Mauss, 1990 ). A significant body of scholarship has explored aid as ‘gift exchanges’. This article moves beyond seeing aid as symbolic violence or a source of asymmetric power

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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The underlying push of symbolic violence in France
Saskia Huc-Hepher

experiences in France. To appreciate how these negative forces operate in the premigration fields of education, employment and the wider social space, and consequently influence participant mobility and emplacement, I draw on Bourdieu’s theory of symbolic violence. Much of the originality of Bourdieu’s thinking lies in his emphasis on revealing the unseen, be it the internalisation of external structures central to his habitus theory or his acknowledgement of the symbolic power tacitly governing our social systems and interactions. Accordingly, the muted weight of

in French London
Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski, and Svenja Mintert

the theories of violence associated with football, particularly around hooliganism in England. It will address the inter-group dynamics of the actual physical confrontations that occasionally occur at football matches. Finally, it will identify the symbolic violence of matchday choreographies and how these both intensify the emotional energy at matches, as well as diffuse tensions. The difference between ultras and hooligans Throughout this book, and particularly in Chapter 3, there have been frequent comparisons between the English and Italian styles of fandom. The

in Ultras
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‘Brexit blues’
Saskia Huc-Hepher

can no longer turn a blind eye to the othering that has persisted for decades (Fox et al ., 2012 ; Looney, 2018; Huc-Hepher, 2019 ; Rzepnikowska, 2019 ), for they are now confronted with its tangible and unwavering everyday validation (Anderson and Wilson, 2018 ). In this sense, the referendum and its aftermath are the ultimate materialisation of symbolic violence. Having developed from mediated (Fox et al ., 2012 ) and socially accepted microaggressions, often disguised as humour (Huc-Hepher, 2019 ) or ‘teasing/banter and minor comments (mainly on their

in French London
Delights and follies in filmic discourse
María Donapetry

symbolic violence. Subjective violence is the concrete act or series of acts of violence performed by one subject on another. In Thesis we hardly see any of these acts, although we are invited to imagine them. On the one hand, this concealment of subjective violent acts frustrates our expectations but, on the other, it also maintains narrative suspense. Objective violence is what produces the acts of violence. That is, the

in Spanish cinema 1973–2010
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Blended understandings of symbolic forces in London-French education on-land and on-line
Saskia Huc-Hepher

group directly affected by ‘Brexit’, for migrant ‘archives are not only records of the past but are also maps for the future’ (Appadurai, 2019 : 558). Nevertheless, my focus in the following two chapters is not on the impact of the 2016 EU membership referendum (see the Epilogue for that discussion). Rather, I return to the themes of symbolic violence, cultural and social capital, habitus and home, doing so from a progressively digital perspective, using data sourced in the web archive and the ‘live’ internet. Since the turn of this century, which saw the

in French London
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

contemporary issues of Windies decline and increasing South Asian migration to Toronto. This analysis extends the concept of the Black Atlantic beyond an inward-facing focus on shared transnational cultures and racial terror to an outward facing focus on relational boundary making and the real and symbolic violence enacted by blacks. Space invaders The Mavericks have vituperative

in Sport in the Black Atlantic