This book provides a chronological study of popular cinema in Brazil since the introduction of sound at the beginning of the 1930s. It begins the study with a brief discussion of how people understand the term 'popular cinema', particularly within a Latin American context. The focus is on films that have intentionally engaged with 'low-brow' cultural products, whose origins lie in pre-industrial traditions, and which have been enjoyed by wide sectors of the population, chiefly at the lower end of the social hierarchy. Perhaps the most important contribution of the chanchada of the 1950s was to render visible a social class within Brazil's socio-cultural landscape, and to champion the underdog, who succeeds in triumphing, through malandragem, over more powerful opponents. Brazilian popular cinema, at least until the 1980s, can be seen as a direct descendant of other shared cultural experiences. Popular film in Brazil is littered with examples of carnivalesque inversions of societal norms and established hierarchies. The 1930s witnessed the rise of the radio, the record industry and the talking cinema. The first half of the 1940s witnessed a continuation of Getúlio Vargas's quest for economic expansion based on the creation of a dignified workforce, rewarded for its efforts by improvements in the welfare system. The book also looks at three very popular cinematic sub-genres which provided a continuation of the chanchada tradition in Brazilian filmmaking: the films of Amacio Mazzaropi; those of the comedic quartet known as the Trapalhoes; and the so-called pornochanchada series of films.

Abstract only
Pagnol as auteur
Brett Bowles

contribution to classic French film as an auteur and businessman while at the same time evaluating the larger cultural and aesthetic stakes of his movies. Doing so means reconsidering Pagnol in several ways: first, by offering a reading of style and technique that links his theories on film, theatre, and the primacy of dialogue over image with French economic and social anxieties triggered by the arrival of talking cinema and the

in Marcel Pagnol
Abstract only
Stephanie Dennison and Lisa Shaw

. The 1930s witnessed the rise of the radio, the record industry and the talking cinema. Popular culture as a whole became the focus of the attentions of Vargas’s propaganda-mongers, and a delicate balancing act of co-option and censorship was employed to enlist the support of popular musicians and artists in the construction of a nation-conscious mythology. The fledgling Brazilian film industry was seen as an important facet of the

in Popular cinema in Brazil, 1930–2001
Abstract only
Derek Schilling

the same time. ‘Si parler te soulage, fais-le’ (If talking makes you feel better, go right ahead), exclaims Arsinoé to her secretive husband Fiodor in Triple agent. By now, Rohmer, the standard-bearer of the modern talking cinema, should be feeling a good bit relieved. References Braucourt , Guy ( 1976 ), ‘L’envie de me sentir vraiment metteur en scène’, Ecran 47, May: 19

in Eric Rohmer
Pagnol, Paramount, and Marius on-screen
Brett Bowles

Since the early 1930s critics and scholars have often inaccurately characterised Pagnol’s films as ‘théâtre photographié’ (photographed theatre) or ‘théâtre en conserve’ (canned theatre), labels that the director himself sometimes defiantly appropriated to justify his defection from the stage and to generate publicity for his new career. While it is true that Pagnol conceived talking cinema as ‘l

in Marcel Pagnol
Brett Bowles

. Logistically, the only elements missing were a studio and development laboratories, which Richebé agreed to furnish until Pagnol could acquire his own. The production strategy of Les Auteurs associés was straightforward and meant to vindicate its owner’s vision of talking cinema: to transpose popular stage plays, keeping the original dialogue unchanged while amplifying its dramatic effect through the use of basic

in Marcel Pagnol
Stephanie Dennison and Lisa Shaw

, in the 1930s it vied with the talking cinema as the mouthpiece for promoting the music destined for the annual celebration. The inversions so intrinsic to carnival were reflected in the title of the 1915 revista De pernas pro ar (Topsy-Turvy), which featured the tenor Vicente Celestino, who would go on to star in one of the biggest box-office successes before 1960, O ébrio (The Drunkard, 1946

in Popular cinema in Brazil, 1930–2001
Marnie (1964)
K. J. Donnelly

disappears and sound and images have a more free play of activity as they adopt the foregound unambiguously. This is not the ‘talking cinema’ that swept the world in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Indeed, Hitchcock’s oeuvre is one of the most clear examples of the persistence of the silent film aesthetic in that many key sequences clearly are visual in impetus rather than based on talking. The images are red and relatively static, a clear part of what Robin Wood (1989: 176) sees as the film’s non-​naturalistic drive.22 In contrast, the music is energetic, ‘stormy’ and

in Partners in suspense
Abstract only
Genesis of Carax’s system
Fergus Daly and Garin Dowd

maintain the rhythm they’ve established between the time to live, the time to love and the time to die’; ‘black and white is the fundamental colour of the cinema.’ 16 ‘aren’t the directors who count today those who interrogate the silent cinema by way of the absurd, through asking how the talking cinema speaks (or vice versa

in Leos Carax
Derek Schilling

conceptions of liberty and action, adopted from the late 1940s onward. Rohmer’s disquisition on space was followed by the compact manifesto, ‘Pour un cinéma parlant’ (‘For a Talking Cinema’ MS). The piece opens with the provocative claim that despite the introduction of sound, the cinema has yet to learn how to talk: ‘Il n’y a eu en somme jusqu’ici … que du cinéma sonore’ (until now there has only been sound cinema

in Eric Rohmer