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from Dracula to the Twilight Saga
Antonio Sanna

This article will analyse (the lack of) telepathic connection between the characters of Edward and Bella in Meyers Twilight Saga and compare it to the subliminal link between the Transylvanian vampire and Mina in Dracula. The lack of a telepathic bond between the two characters will be read as a contradiction of the original concept of telepathy. The Twilight Saga is interpreted as a postmodern representation of vampires which both reprises and subverts the precedent literary and cinematographic narratives of such,‘monsters’.

Gothic Studies
Jodey Castricano

In Shirley Jackson‘s novel The Haunting of Hill House, the tropes of haunting, telepathy, and clairvoyance serve to remind us that there is more to alterity than the shattering of the autos. In Jackson‘s novel, these tropes lead us to reconsider what we mean by subjectivity for, beyond the question of consciousness, they also destabilize what Sonu Shamdasani refers to as the “singular notion of the ‘unconscious’ that has dominated twentieth century thought,” especially via Freudian psychoanalysis. By drawing upon Carl Jung‘s theory of synchronicity in relation to quantum theory, this paper argues that Jackson‘s novel challenges certain classical models of human consciousness and subjectivity as well as psychoanalytic models of interpretation.

Gothic Studies
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Nicholas Royle

off into the unknown. I would discuss Waiting for Godot and Happy Days , as well as Endgame (1958) and Embers (1959). I would recount a dream I’d had about Derrida, Cixous and Beckett. And, finally, I would write about FirstDays of the Year , about ‘The Ideal Story’ at the end of that book, about the figure of the author and the question of telepathy. I was gathering up my resources, preparing to start, and then my house was invaded, not even from a side entrance but straight through the front door, a white jiffybag flip clomp on the doormat, along with the

in Hélène Cixous
Naomi Booth

narratives anxiously – and erotically – present catastrophic entanglements and interconnections between the human and non-human others. In the frequent swoons of vampire victims, human consciousness is reconfigured in ways that are darkly ecological – that connect the vampire victim to networks of predation, telepathy, environmental degradation, contagion, and to the zoonotic transmission of disease (a newly intense fear, perhaps, for those of us reading in the COVID-era, but one which we can trace back to historical outbreaks of plague and other contagions

in Swoon
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Nicholas Royle

to the bed and wrenche[s] open the lattice, bursting, as he pull[s] at it, into an uncontrollable passion of tears. “Come in! come in!” he sob[s]. “Cathy, do come. Oh, do – once more! Oh! my heart’s darling, hear me this time – Catherine, at last!” ’ (23). As Heathcliff appears to respond to the dead girl in Lockwood’s dream (‘Let me in – let me in!’), the terrifying reality of telepathy materialises. It is all true. We are in the telepathic reality generated out of dream in literature . Like many of Cixous’s literary life-writings, Los, A Chapter

in Hélène Cixous
Nicholas Royle

the impressions of a new day just as the brilliance of the stars yields to the light of the sun’ (45). Both metaphorically reaching for the sky, Strümpell describes in one way what it is to awake, Freud in another. A Freudian twosome. Two awake. You cannot die at the same time as the other, but you can at least believe or make believe you wake up, two awake, togetherwake. For Cixous and Derrida, of course, it’s never only two, one plus one always equals at least three, that’s the abc of their psychoanalyses, and it’s also where the question of telepathy begins. 11

in Hélène Cixous
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Author: Nicholas Royle

This book provides a lucid, wide-ranging and up-to-date critical introduction to the writings of Hélène Cixous (1937–). Cixous is often considered ‘difficult’. Moreover she is extraordinarily prolific, having published dozens of books, essays, plays and other texts. Royle avoids any pretence of a comprehensive survey, instead offering a rich and diverse sampling. At once expository and playful, original and funny, this micrological approach enables a new critical understanding and appreciation of Cixous’s writing. If there is complexity in her work, Royle suggests, there is also uncanny simplicity and great pleasure. The book focuses on key motifs such as dreams, the supernatural, literature, psychoanalysis, creative writing, realism, sexual differences, laughter, secrets, the ‘Mother unconscious’, drawing, painting, autobiography as ‘double life writing’, unidentifiable literary objects (ULOs), telephones, non-human animals, telepathy and the ‘art of cutting’. Particular stress is given to Cixous’s work in relation to Sigmund Freud and Jacques Derrida, as well as to her importance in the context of ‘English literature’. There are close readings of Shakespeare, Emily Brontë, P. B. Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Lewis Carroll, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, for example, alongside in-depth explorations of her own writings, from Inside (1969) and ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ (1975) up to the present. Royle’s book will be of particular interest to students and academics coming to Cixous’s work for the first time, but it will also appeal to readers interested in contemporary literature, creative writing, life writing, narrative theory, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, ecology, drawing and painting.

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Nicholas Royle

. Eliot resurrects in ‘Gerontion’ from Lancelot Andrewes, to Samuel Beckett’s subatomically fevered ‘what is the word’, to Derrida’s telepathy: ‘I felt, from a distance and confusedly, that I was searching for a word, perhaps a proper name…’ 1 It is the fate of a character in An English Guide to Birdwatching : ‘The sentence he was writing as he hovered over his keyboard , staring at the screen, pursuing the pulsing vertical of the cursor as it left in its wake a new letter, then word, punctuation, space, till the final full-stop, gave Stephen Osmer such an access of

in Hélène Cixous
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The rise of the psychic detective
Neil Cornwell

calls the ‘telepathy effect’ of the narrative text (256–76), he seeks to supplant ‘omniscience’ (and such related narratological terms as ‘point of view’ and ‘focalization’) with ‘telepathy’ – a term which, as he says, only entered the vocabulary in the late nineteenth century (260–1). The emergence then of ‘telepathy’, Royle considers, ‘figures an important moment in what we have called the disappearance of omniscience, as well as in the origins of psychoanalysis’; telepathy ‘calls for a quite different kind of critical storytelling than that promoted by the

in Odoevsky’s four pathways into modern fiction
Detection, deviance and disability in Richard Marsh’s Judith Lee stories
Minna Vuohelainen

Marsh and topical discourses of crime coining the word ‘telepathy’ to suggest ‘an oxymoronic distant (tele-) intimacy or touch (pathos)’.74 While the links between science, speech therapy, telecommunications, psychical research and pseudo-scientific degeneration theory may now seem far-fetched, turn-of-the-century scientists were preoccupied by the ‘proleptic promise’ of ‘an electrical future’ and of ‘previously inconceivable forms of interpersonal connection’.75 A particularly striking example is provided by Alexander Graham Bell, one of the period’s leading

in Richard Marsh, popular fiction and literary culture, 1890–1915