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A practical approach to working in multi-camera studios

This book is about producing video content with a multi-camera set-up. The principles apply whatever the form of distribution: digital network, Internet, mobile phone or 'other'. It is intended to be used alongside practical courses or modules, both in teaching institutions and in professional training environments. The book centres on Health and Safety in TV studios, which are potentially dangerous places. It gives a lot of key information about television studios and the people who work in them. The book focuses on exercises to practise some basic principles and shows how to build on these and develop proposals and projects. It goes into more detail on Drama, Music and Action, both in the context of student projects and in the professional world. The book explains detail of television aspect ratios; and a little about the meanings of Continuity. Since many multi-camera video productions use inserts shot on single camera, there are several references to single-camera shooting. The necessary elements in multi-camera production are: a vision mixer (switcher) for selecting the images to be recorded or transmitted; a Director co-ordinating the content; an assistant to keep track of timings and where the Director is in the script; and a Camera Operator for each camera, with a tally-light to show when the particular camera is on-shot.

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Jonathan Bignell

Introduction This chapter examines the significance of the production technologies used in making the five dramas written by Beckett for television and compares and contrasts these production technologies with those used in realising Film and television adaptations of theatre texts by Beckett. The British television plays were recorded in television studios and were shot on film, with the exception of Eh Joe (1966), which was a videotape production. The German productions of Beckett’s plays in the 1980s were

in Beckett on screen
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Roger Singleton-Turner

Cue and Cut is about producing video content with a multi-camera set-up. The principles apply whatever the form of distribution: digital network, Internet, mobile phone or ‘other’. It is intended to be used alongside practical courses or modules, both in teaching institutions and in professional training environments. Part I centres on Health and Safety in TV studios, which are potentially dangerous places. This is a primary concern and that is why it is given so much space early in this handbook. Part II gives a lot of key information about television

in Cue and Cut
Roger Singleton-Turner

What follows are some general points about safety in TV studios, whether student or professional. In the professional world, you will find regulations covering all these topics – and more – affecting every production unit in the UK. YOU MUST ALSO MAKE YOURSELF FAMILIAR WITH YOUR CENTRE’S HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES. These pages are intended to complement those. Other countries will have their own laws and regulations, but the general principles apply everywhere! There are some points here about safety on location because it is sometimes necessary to

in Cue and Cut
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Roger Singleton-Turner

; specially trained staff should prepare and operate them. The UK rules (so far) are slightly more relaxed about some kinds of smoke-gun, but black or coloured smoke is not allowed in TV studios. In enclosed spaces, it is toxic! Great care has to be taken and expert advice in these areas must be heeded. Health and Safety legislation is quite clear on the necessary standards of care! Chases Chases in a studio are difficult to arrange because they tend to require speed and therefore distance. Few TV studios in the UK exceed 30 metres square (though there are

in Cue and Cut
Derek Paget

(continuous legal vetting) ➝ cast and crew assembled. • P roduction Read-through ➝ rehearsal ➝ shooting in studio and on location ➝ ongoing research + re-drafting/script editing + legal checks. • P ost-production Editing ➝ dubbing ➝ research updating for website + continued legal checks ➝ television: scheduling + press preview/film: focus-grouping + re-editing. • T elevision transmission/Film release  Docudrama reaches audience. • R eception post-transmission/post-release  Public discussion (for example: radio and television studio debate, newspaper articles

in No other way to tell it
Brett Mills

. The interplay between audiences and performers in comedy is demonstrated by the shooting style of many television sitcoms, which garner a real audience to watch the recording, re-creating the theatrical experience within a television studio. This audience is seen as so vital to the comic performance that its oral responses are recorded, resulting in the laugh track which accompanies many sitcoms. It is significant that many

in Genre and performance
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Roger Singleton-Turner

The studio You can expect to find all or most of the following elements in any multi-camera TV studio – there’s more about most of them further into the book and some are clear in Figure 1.1 : A big, dark, soundproof, empty space. A grid or gantry below roof level from which lights and scenery can be hung. Fire exits, fire lane and safety lighting. The fire lane is usually a strip around all or most of the studio perimeter, between the studio walls and the ‘setting line’ (the limit to which scenery may be set). Although it must be kept clear of

in Cue and Cut
Roger Singleton-Turner

appropriate. Microphones: a summary All microphones convert sound waves into electrical signals. You can find many models of microphone in TV studios. Each has its uses but this is not the best place for a full analysis. Although there are others, the kinds you are likely to come across fall into one of three types: condenser , dynamic and ribbon . All have a diaphragm. As sound waves in the air hit this, it vibrates. What happens then depends on the type of mike. Condenser The diaphragm is metallic and lies close to an electrically charged back plate

in Cue and Cut
Mark Bennister

mainstream television studios. Although in his later years he admitted a respect for the Paxmans and Humphreys (perhaps due to his brief and unsuccessful foray into interviewing at Granada TV in 1960), he could in his pomp be an intimidating and difficult interviewee. This extended to walking out of a live Channel 4 news interview in 1986 when he learnt that a recording of an interview with Clive Ponting was to be broadcast on air. It was during Heseltine’s five years out of government that he did most to engage beyond the formal political arenas. He toured constituencies

in Conservative orators from Baldwin to Cameron