Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 134 items for :

  • "the recall" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Matt Qvortrup

4 The recall of elected politicians A comparative analysis of the recall of elected officials On 3 September 2011 this story appeared in a local paper in the small town of Sheboygan in Wisconsin. It is worth quoting it verbatim: A Sheboygan City Council member has started a campaign to recall embattled Mayor Bob Ryan. Kevin MatiChek, the Alderman who started the petition, said a recall would be cheaper and quicker than the legal process the Council had approved earlier this month. Seven formal complaints have been filed against the mayor, after he went on a

in Direct democracy
An American case study
Matt Qvortrup

the recall”. Very little has been written about this, even though this is an important aspect of democracy 2 . A political scientist has defined the recall as “a form of direct democracy that allows voters to limit an elected official’s term in office” 3 . To be a proper recall, the “process begins with an application to circulate a petition for a recall”, and, if “the proponents

in Democracy on demand
Abstract only
A comparative study of the theory and practice of government by the people
Author:

Drawing on the insights of political theory as well as empirical and comparative government, the book provides an up-to-date overview of the theories and practice of referendums and initiatives around the world. The book discusses if we ought to hold more referendums, and how the processes of direct democracy have been used – and occasionally abused -around the world.

Abstract only
Holding power to account
Author:

Voters can be sophisticated. In 2018, a majority of the voters in Florida voted for a conservative governor, but they also voted to give prisoners the right to vote, something the Republican Governor had opposed. The voters showed that they were able to distinguish measures from men. Politics is not just about tribal partisanship. Voters demand more choice. And they are able to exercise their judgement. Florida is not unique. This is a global trend. A large majority of voters all over the world – according to opinion polls – want more referendums. But are they capable of making decisions on complex issues? And aren’t such votes an invitation to ill-considered populism? This book answers these questions and shows what the effect of referendums have on public policy, on welfare and well-being, and outlines how some of the criticisms of referendums and initiatives can be remedied.

Anne Byrne

3 The lit de justice of November 1774 Introduction Though the funeral ceremony for Louis XV at Saint Denis in July 1774 had been the focus of so much political wrangling, it was not the last act in the drama around the reinstatement of the parlement nor was it the last ritual heavy with political implications. Ritual was also deployed to political ends in the eventual recall of the parlement of Paris, in November 1774.1 Historians examining the events between his accession and the recall have usually concluded that Louis XVI was skilfully manipulated into taking

in Death and the crown
Abstract only
Ritual and politics in France before the Revolution
Author:

In May 1774, Louis XV died, triggering a sequence of rituals unseen in fifty-nine years. This book explores how these one-in-a-reign rituals unfolded fifteen years before the Revolution. From the deathbed of Louis XV, the book covers his funeral, the lit de justice of November 1774, and the coronation of Louis XVI and related ceremonies in June 1775, relating them all to the politics of the day. Threads of continuity emerge from this closely woven narrative to form a compelling picture of these ceremonies in the dynamic culture of 1770s France. Light is shed on the place of monarchy, the recall of the parlements and the conduct of the coronation. This study provides an overview of the current state of the field of ritual studies in English and French, situating ritual in relation to court studies as well as political history. It covers court life, the relationship between the monarch and the parlement, the preparation of large-scale rituals and the ways in which those outside the court engaged with these events, providing rich detail on this under-researched period. Written in a clear, lively style, this book is the ideal text for the non-specialist and, as each chapter deals with one ritual, it lends itself readily to undergraduate teaching of topics around monarchy, court society, ritual, and politics, including the Maupeou coup. More advanced students and specialists on the period will find new perspectives and information presented in an engaging manner.

Abstract only
The age of supply­side politics?
Matt Qvortrup

, citizens’ initiatives and the recall. What can we conclude? Are these mechanisms as efficient as they are said to be? Or are they as dangerous as others would have us believe? Critics have argued that direct democracy is both time-­consuming and costly, and that it would lead to democratic fatigue. In extreme cases they are right. People do not want politics all the time. Yet in manageable doses, direct democracy – as employed in New Zealand, and at the local level in Germany, and the Netherlands – works, and provides an effective complement to the representative system

in Direct democracy
From Pound to Prynne
Author:

The book begins by attempting to define the theoretical and ideological factors contributing to what the author calls 'late modernism' (schematically, occupying the period 1945-1975). It sets out the historical bases of my argument, and reexamines Pound's use of hermetic sources in the light of recent scholarship on the modernist occult. The hermetic in poetry is generally associated with forms of modernist writing deriving from romantic and symbolist models. The book focuses on Prynne's use of the shaman as a figure mediating between crude archetypal theories of the historical subject and a sophisticated temporal dialectic. It explores Heidegger's influence on late modernist poetics in more detail. Heidegger is a highly problematic figure in modern critical theory because he is at once the modernist thinker par excellence and the architect of postmodernism. The book provides an account of late modernism's revision of the fundamental romantic and modernist tropes of obscurity and fragmentation. It theorises the dialectical grounds of the relationship between hermetic poetry and philosophical commentary. The survival of romantic aesthetics in modernism is considered, leading into preliminary remarks on the deconstruction of the romantic fragment and Heidegger's theory of the Unheimliche. The questions of identity and dispersal, meaning and non-meaning, return to the uncanny by way of the Lacanian problematic of translation and the dream-work, involving the position of the subject called' by the otherness of the obscure text.

New interdisciplinary essays
Editor:

Much of the writing about The Prince is often at a certain distance from the text, not engaging with it in a critical or textual way. One of the features of the chapters in this book is the extent to which they focus on the complex texture of Machiavelli's writing and on the complex reading processes this in turn calls forth. Indeed, the book argues that it is not simply, as modern theorists have it, that the reader creates the meaning of the text but that certain texts in our culture - texts like The Prince - create and demand a more complicated response from readers as well as different kinds of reading. In other words, they demand a plural approach. The book brings together both a variety of critical viewpoints and a variety of disciplines but also a series of arguments which would allow the reader to engage in a debate that was at once broadly based and intensely focused. That debate has to include proper recognition of the particular circumstances of Machiavelli's writing, an awareness of the modern critical approaches now being explored in relation to The Prince, and a sense of the connection between Machiavelli and the twentieth century. What is clear, however, is that The Prince remains an important text in the attempt to understand cultural history and one that reminds us how difficult but rewarding that task is.

Prisoners of the past
Author:

This book examines the impact that nostalgia has had on the Labour Party’s political development since 1951. In contrast to existing studies that have emphasised the role played by modernity, it argues that nostalgia has defined Labour’s identity and determined the party’s trajectory over time. It outlines how Labour, at both an elite and a grassroots level, has been and remains heavily influenced by a nostalgic commitment to an era of heroic male industrial working-class struggle. This commitment has hindered policy discussion, determined the form that the modernisation process has taken and shaped internal conflict and cohesion. More broadly, Labour’s emotional attachment to the past has made it difficult for the party to adjust to the socioeconomic changes that have taken place in Britain. In short, nostalgia has frequently left the party out of touch with the modern world. In this way, this book offers an assessment of Labour’s failures to adapt to the changing nature and demands of post-war Britain.