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Sam Rohdie

Time Tout le passé est nécessaire pour aimer le présent. (The entire past is necessary in order to love the present.) Annie Ernaux20 There is no single narrative to films by Bernardo Bertolucci, none that follows (or traces) a progressive, chronological line. For the most part, his films begin in a present already past or a past yet to be, but in dissolution, a future or a present becoming past, and becoming the past instantly, as each time is made apparent, and apparent at the same time. Each and every time contains other times, the multiplicities of time

in Film modernism
Open Access (free)
Undoing the Past in Jean Améry and James Baldwin
Joseph Weiss

This article compares the works of James Baldwin and Jean Améry, a survivor of the Jewish Holocaust. It attempts to unpack the ethical and political implications of their shared conception of the temporality of trauma. The experiences of the victim of anti-Semitism and the victim of anti-Black racism not only parallel one another, but their mutual incapacity to let go of the injustice of the past also generates a unique ethico-political response. The backward glance of the victim, the avowed incapacity to heal, as well as the phantasmatic desire to reverse time all guide this unique response. Instead of seeking forgiveness for the wrong done and declaring that all forms of resentment are illegitimate, Baldwin and Améry show us that channeling the revenge fantasy that so often attends the temporality of trauma is the material precondition of actually ending that trauma. This ultimately suggests that, for both thinkers, anything less than a new, revolutionary humanism equipped with an internationalist political project would betray the victims’ attempt to win back their dignity.

James Baldwin Review
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Gender, anti-Semitism and temporality in medieval biblical drama
Author:

This book produces an important re-theorisation of the ways gender, time and Judaism have been considered in late medieval biblical drama. It employs theories of gender, performance, antisemitism, queer theory and periodisation to complicate readings of early theatre’s biblical matriarchs and patriarchs. It argues that the conflicts staged by these plays provide crucial evidence of the ways late medieval lay producers, performers and audiences were themselves encouraged to question, experience, manipulate and understand time. Interrogating medieval models of supersession and typology alongside more contemporary models of ‘queer’ and topological time, this book charts the conflicts staged between dramatic personae in plays that represent theological transitions or ruptures, such as the Incarnation, Flood, Nativity and Bethlehem slaughter. While these plays reflect a Christian preoccupation with what it asserted was a ‘superseded’ Jewish past, this book asks how these models are subverted when placed in dialogue with characters who experience alternative readings of time.

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Dana Arnold

constant flux then we see how it changes its identity over time and consequently has fluid potential, capacities, and indeed uses within its field of cultural production at any given moment. Time lines I would like to begin by thinking about the significance of the line, which both of these graphic art forms, together with writing, have in common. 1 Certainly, the eighteenth-century understanding of the line stresses its protean nature. For instance, we might think about Dr Samuel Johnson’s (1709–84) Dictionary of the English Language first published in 1755

in Architecture and ekphrasis
Open Access (free)
M. Anne Brown

EAST TIMOR WAS forcibly incorporated into Indonesia in 1975 and managed, through a confluence of circumstances that was at once remarkable and yet another example of a suppressed people snapping back like bent but unbroken twigs (to use Isaiah Berlin’s phrase), to become independent almost twenty-five years later. Now the territory, poised on the edge of statehood, is undergoing transition, but also flux and confusion. At the time of writing the United Nations Transitional Authority for East Timor (UNTAET) is effectively the Government of

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Open Access (free)
Cartographic temporalities

The digital era has brought about huge transformations in the map itself, which to date have been largely conceptualised in spatial terms. The emergence of novel objects, forms, processes and approaches in the digital era has, however, posed a swathe of new, pressing questions about the temporality of digital maps and contemporary mapping practices, and in spite of its implicit spatiality, digital mapping is strongly grounded in time. In this peer-reviewed collection we bring time back into the map, taking up Doreen Massey's critical concern for 'ongoing stories' in the world, but asking how mapping continues to wrestle with the difficulty of enrolling time into these narratives, often seeking to ‘freeze’ and ‘fix’ the world, in lieu of being able to, in some way, represent, document or capture dynamic phenomena. This collection examines how these processes are impacted by digital cartographic technologies that, arguably, have disrupted our understanding of time as much as they have provided coherence. The book consists of twelve chapters that address different kinds of digital mapping practice and analyse these in relation to temporality. Cases discussed range from locative art projects, OpenStreetMap mapping parties, sensory mapping, Google Street View, visual mapping, smart city dashboards and crisis mapping. Authors from different disciplinary positions consider how a temporal lens might focus attention on different aspects of digital mapping. This kaleidoscopic approach generates a rich plethora for understanding the temporal modes of digital mapping. The interdisciplinary background of the authors allows multiple positions to be developed.

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Ian Wedde

Curating time Ian Wedde Reading the chapters in this book I was struck by how often issues of time were critical to the discussions. ‘Time’, of course, is a very complex word that James Clifford parses with great economy in ‘The Times of the Curator’ (Chapter 7); but I was interested also in the ways in which issues of time were present as a kind of haunting in the texts assembled here, present (so to speak) by implication rather than by intent; and sometimes it was the absence of reflection on time that struck me as another kind of haunting, as if issues of

in Curatopia
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The iconography of water in painting and photography
Vybarr Cregan-Reid

3961 Discovering Gilgamesh.qxd:Layout 1 24/6/13 12:49 Page 73 2 Capturing time: the iconography of water in painting and photography It is like trying to paint a soul.1 (Ruskin, on water in Modern Painters) T he plurality of Victorian ideas or beliefs about time is ably represented in the visual arts of the period. The ideological productivity of Victorian ideas concerning temporality came in part from a sort of dynamic energy; energy derived from their sheer difference to that which had preceded them. The vision of the distant past that circulated most

in Discovering Gilgamesh
Open Access (free)
Keeping up appearances
Kinneret Lahad

8 Time work: keeping up appearances Over the years that I have researched Israeli internet portals, I have detected a repetitive, periodical movement. As holidays like Rosh Hashana ( Jewish New Year’s Eve) and Passover, or widely commemorated romantic celebrations like Valentine’s Day approach, Israeli websites begin to publish a range of columns, written by and about single women, discussing their fears of being—and appearing to be—on their own over the holidays. This phenomenon is not unique to Israeli society, of course. One can easily find any number of

in A table for one
R.M. Liuzza

Long before the invention of the mechanical clock, the monastic computes offered a model of time that was visible, durable, portable and objectifiable. The development of ‘temporal literacy’ among the Anglo-Saxons involved not only the measurement of time but also the ways in which the technologies used to measure and record time — from sundials and church bells to calendars and chronicles — worked to create and reorder cultural capital, and add new scope and range to the life of the imagination. Techniques of time measurement are deeply implicated in historical consciousness and the assertion of identity; this paper proposes some avenues of exploration for this topic among the Anglo-Saxons.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library