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Murray Stewart Leith
and
Duncan Sim

Introduction This chapter explores the relationship between Scotland’s heritage and its large and significant tourist industry. We will discuss how tourism has developed in Scotland, how the country ‘sells’ itself, the relevance of the imagery associated with Scotland (tartan and the like) and the various elements that make up the tourist industry. The chapter builds on some of the topics we have already discussed elsewhere, such as Scotland’s imagery ( Chapter 4 ), diaspora and what might be termed ‘roots’ tourism ( Chapter 10 ) and aspects of the country

in Scotland
Ruth Holliday
,
Meredith Jones
, and
David Bell

Locating cosmetic surgery tourism 63 3 Locating cosmetic surgery tourism It’s been quite helpful to see other girls who are going and who are there and seeing photos of them over there, seeing photos of them post-op. You see the whole journey and it’s really personal … Some have been having a bad time, they’ve been in more pain than they expected, whereas some of them are out on the back of elephants, so it’s good to see how everybody is different … and one girl got, like, an infection, you know. So, it’s not showing only the good side of the story. I hope

in Beautyscapes
Semantics and the Scottish diaspora
Paul Basu

obvious exception of Zionism, the role of ‘homeland’ for most such movements has remained largely symbolic. This chapter is concerned with the contemporary phenomenon of ‘roots tourism’ in the Scottish Highlands and Islands: journeys made by people of Scottish Highland descent (or part-Highland descent) ordinarily living in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and in other regions where Scots have historically settled to places associated with their ancestors in the ‘old country’. To borrow a phrase from the

in Emigrant homecomings
Colonialism in the photographs and letters of the young cosmopolitan Carl Heinrich Becker, 1900–2
Ulf Morgenstern

Chapter Seven ‘Scientific tourism’: colonialism in the photographs and letters of the young cosmopolitan Carl Heinrich Becker, 1900–2 Ulf Morgenstern At the turn of the twentieth century the German orientalist scholar and later politician Carl Heinrich Becker (1876–1933) undertook a voyage to the north of Africa. The young man had already visited England, France, Italy and Spain as well as Switzerland and the Netherlands, the

in Savage worlds
Caregiving companions and medical travel facilitators
Ruth Holliday
,
Meredith Jones
, and
David Bell

86 Beautyscapes: mapping cosmetic surgery tourism 4 The work of cosmetic surgery tourism I: caregiving companions and medical travel facilitators Our aim in the next two chapters is to outline the various forms of work or labour that are brought together to make cosmetic surgery happen.1 Through this focus on work we aim to provide a detailed overview of the cosmetic surgery tourism industry, focusing on the key actors whose work is central to the production of cosmetic surgery tourism. In this chapter we look closely at two key groups, one providing unpaid

in Beautyscapes
Ruth Holliday
,
Meredith Jones
, and
David Bell

144 Beautyscapes: mapping cosmetic surgery tourism 7 Decentring and disorienting cosmetic surgery tourism While medical tourism historically has meant wealthy travellers leaving the Global South to seek treatment in the Global North, in the last few decades the direction of patient flows has changed. In academic work, medical tourism has commonly come to be conceptualised in terms of colonialism and orientalism: wealthy westerners exploiting low-wage economies in developing countries and experiencing them through a patronising ‘orientalist gaze’ – not liking

in Beautyscapes
Health workers and patients
Ruth Holliday
,
Meredith Jones
, and
David Bell

108 Beautyscapes: mapping cosmetic surgery tourism 5 The work of cosmetic surgery tourism II: health workers and patients The previous chapter provided an overview of the structure of the cosmetic surgery tourism industry as a prelude to a detailed exploration of the forms of work undertaken by some of the key actors in the cosmetic surgery tourism assemblage. Basing our discussion in sociological debates about ‘new’ forms of work or labour – care work, body work, emotional labour and aesthetic labour – we showed how informal caregiving companions and MTFs

in Beautyscapes
Rozita Dimova

the other side. Notes 1 For more on the role of tourism in dissolving or fortifying borders see Clifford 1998 , Scott and Lu 2006 , Scott and Selwyn 2010 . 2 It is important to note here that while the Yugoslav dinar itself was convertible, not only were the limits on amounts

in Border porosities
Elizabeth C. Macknight

Initiatives for preservation and tourism 221 8 Initiatives for preservation and tourism True grandeur is free, sweet, familiar, popular; it allows one to touch and to handle; it loses nothing by being seen close up.1 On 25 May 1946 the Association d’entraide de la noblesse française (ANF) approved by vote at its annual general meeting an application for membership from the comte Joseph de Montgrand. Prior to the meeting, the Montgrand dossier had been scrutinised by the association’s commission des preuves that comprised experts on nobiliary law, genealogy

in Nobility and patrimony in modern France
Helen Jarvis

The Khmer Rouge forbade the conduct of any funeral rites at the time of the death of the estimated two million people who perished during their rule (1975–79). Since then, however, memorials have been erected and commemorative ceremonies performed, both public and private, especially at former execution sites, known widely as the killing fields. The physical remains themselves, as well as images of skulls and the haunting photographs of prisoners destined for execution, have come to serve as iconic representations of that tragic period in Cambodian history and have been deployed in contested interpretations of the regime and its overthrow.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal