Minority governance has been dismissed as an aberration, an interlude between 'normal' and 'victorious' administrations, which have commanded the interest of politicians, political analysts and the general public. This book is a study that challenges these myths and established perceptions of minority government in the 1970s through a reading of declassified internal government and party files. It demonstrates that there is a distinctive 'British tradition of minority government' that provides a new perspective on the existing corpus of international theory regarding the subject. One of the single greatest myths arising from these sources of coverage, such as interviews, biographies , and political diaries and memoirs is that outside events superseded those in Parliament. The book questions this myth and shows that the strategy-making processes in the Labour and the Conservative Parties were geared towards minority government. It has often been assumed that the formation of the Wilson and Callaghan Minority Governments were inevitable, histories mainly concentrating on changes in personnel and policy. This long-standing myth is challenged by examining the prospect of alternative not adopted, including early elections or interparty coalitions. The book then questions the myths of 1970s minority governments' inability to pass significant legislation without the cooperation of opposition parties. It also explores the myths surrounding the inevitability and form of this 1977-78 Lib-Lab Pact. Myths about 1970s elections and Labour and Conservative post-electoral plans are discussed next. Finally, the book considers how the June 2017 minority government at Westminster may affect planning for future indecisive election.

Between the ancients and the moderns

This book offers a full account of the role played by seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English Republican ideas in eighteenth-century France. Challenging some of the dominant accounts of the Republican tradition, it revises conventional understandings of what Republicanism meant in both Britain and France during the eighteenth century, offering a distinctive trajectory as regards ancient and modern constructions and highlighting variety rather than homogeneity within the tradition. The book thus offers a new perspective on both the legacy of the English Republican tradition and the origins and thought of the French Revolution. It centres around a series of case studies that focus on a number of colourful and influential characters including John Toland, Viscount Bolingbroke, John Wilkes, and the Comte de Mirabeau.

This book explores a number of Alan Moore's works in various forms, including comics, performance, short prose and the novel, and presents a scholarly study of these texts. It offers additional readings to argue for a politically charged sense of Moore's position within the Gothic tradition, investigates surreal Englishness in The Bojeffries Saga, and discusses the doppelganger in Swamp Thing and From Hell. Radical environmental activism can be conceived as a Gothic politics invoking the malevolent spectre of a cataclysmic eco-apocalypse. The book presents Christian W. Schneider's treatment of the apocalyptic in Watchmen and a reassessment of the significance of liminality from the Gothic tradition in V for Vendetta. It explores the relationship between Moore's work and broader textual traditions, placing particular emphasis on the political and cultural significance of intertextual relationships and adaptations. A historically sensitive reading of From Hell connects Moore's concern with the urban environment to his engagement with a range of historical discourses. The book elucidates Moore's treatment of the superhero in relation to key Gothic novels such as The Castle of Otranto and presents an analysis of the nexus of group politics and survival in Watchmen. The book also engages in Moore's theories of art, magic, resurrections, and spirits in its discourse A Small Killing, A Disease of Language, and the Voice of the Fire. It also explores the insight that his adaptations of H.P. Lovecraft, which are laced with heterocosms and bricolage, can yield for broader understandings of his forays into the occult.

Matthew J. A. Green

, Moore’s syncretic imagination erects bridges and opens byways that facilitate traffic between territories as seemingly distinct as pulp fiction and fading folklore, quantum science and anarchist politics, underground comics and the literary canon. His position within the Gothic tradition stems from the ability of his writing to tap into what Fred Botting identifies as the ‘darker

in Alan Moore and the Gothic Tradition
Author: William Butler

This work examines the ‘amateur military tradition’ in Ireland, essentially the framework in which part-time soldiers of the British Army existed, alongside their regular army counterparts, and how they interacted with wider society. In Ireland, this included the militia, yeomanry, Territorial Force (later Army), Officers’ Training Corps, Volunteer Training Corps, the Ulster Home Guard (UHG), and the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR). It covers the period from the re-establishment of the Irish militia during the Crimean War until the disbandment of the UDR after the British Army’s ‘Options for Change’ paper in 1992. Due to Ireland’s peculiar position within the British military framework, a distinct Irish amateur military tradition developed which, in many respects, was different to the English, Welsh, or Scottish traditions. Additionally, two further traditions have been identified, distinctive to the Irish socio-political environment. Firstly, the re-emergence of the Protestant volunteering tradition, witnessed in Ulster as early as the seventeenth century, also found in paramilitary groups such as the Ulster Volunteer Force, and, secondly, a Catholic amateur military tradition, largely present in the Irish militia until the Edwardian period. Crucially, the work recognises a significant contribution of Irish men and women to activities within the British Empire during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Rachel Hammersley

6 The commonwealth tradition and the Wilkite controversies Introduction Bernard Bailyn’s The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution, which was first published in 1967, transformed conventional understandings of the American Revolution. Based on research undertaken for the publication of a collection of American revolutionary pamphlets, Bailyn’s book reasserted the conception of the Revolution as essentially an ‘ideological, constitutional, political struggle’, and demonstrated the fundamental role played by the British commonwealth tradition in shaping

in The English republican tradition and eighteenth-century France
Words, ideas, interactions

Riddles at work is the first volume to bring together multiple scholarly voices to explore the vibrant, poetic riddle tradition of early medieval England and its neighbours. The chapters in this book present a wide range of traditional and experimental methodologies. They treat the riddles both as individual poems and as parts of a tradition, but, most importantly, they address Latin and Old English riddles side-by-side, bringing together texts that originally developed in conversation with each other but have often been separated in scholarship. The ‘General Introduction’ situates this book in its scholarly context. Part I, ‘Words’, presents philological approaches to early medieval riddles—interpretations rooted in close readings of texts—for riddles work by making readers question what words really mean. While reading carefully may lead to elegant solutions, however, such solutions are not the end of the riddling game. Part II, ‘Ideas’, thus explores how riddles work to make readers think anew about objects, relationships, and experiences, using literary theory to facilitate new approaches. Part III, ‘Interactions’, explores how riddles work through connections with other fields, languages, times, and places. Together, the sixteen chapters reveal that there is no single, right way to read these texts but many productive paths—some explored here, some awaiting future work.

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The biopic and the composed film in British art cinema
Brian Hoyle

flamboyant, technically experimental and artistically ambitious. As Wendy Everett has pointed out, this kind of filmmaking, for many British critics, is ‘aesthetic, inauthentic and self-indulgent’ and entirely in opposition to the ‘gritty, realistic and authentic work in the tradition of British documentary’. 2 This attitude has, no doubt, contributed greatly to the perception that Britain has no real art cinema tradition to speak of. At the same time, it has also served to push figures such as Russell to the margins of the British film industry. Indeed, during the final

in British art cinema
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Folk therapeutics and ‘English’ medicine in Rajasthan
Helen Lambert

relationships between different medical traditions since the introduction of Western medicine in Rajasthan. Historical sources that refer to a variety of these traditions provide an additional means through which to construct an account of shifts in these relationships in a former princely state. Together these approaches provide some evidence of transformations that have occurred in the putative medical system

in Western medicine as contested knowledge
Lenore T. Ealy

3 The recovery of tradition Lenore T. Ealy Behind the contemporary crisis of community lies a long history of the slow but inexorable destruction of the traditional communities in the West. Robert Nisbet, Prejudices: A Philosophical Dictionary (1982: 51) Contrary to modernist assertions, traditional architecture does not embody a historic/archaic (i.e. past) knowledge but technical know-how essentially related to the human condition. Léon Krier, The Architecture of Community (2009: 251) The conditions of community are met when consensus prevails about the

in The calling of social thought