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Author: Renate Günther

Marguerite Duras embarked on a second career as a film director in the late 1960s; by then was already a well-known and highly acclaimed novelist and playwright. Bearing in mind this dual influence, this book presents an outline of Duras's early life and of her later political preoccupations, highlighting the relationship between these two dimensions and her films. Duras's aim was to transcend the limitations of both literature and cinema by creating an écriture filmique. Working within the 1970s French avant-garde, Marguerite Duras set out to dismantle the mechanisms of mainstream cinema, progressively undermining conventional representation and narrative and replacing them with her own innovative technique. The making of Nathalie Granger in 1972 coincided with the period of intense political activity and lively theoretical debates, which marked the early years of the post-1968 French feminist movement. India Song questions the categories of gender and sexuality constructed by the patriarchal Symbolic order by foregrounding the Imaginary. Agatha mirrors transgressive relationship and quasi-incestuous adolescent relationship, as the film resonates with the off-screen voices of Duras and Yann Andréa who also appears on the image-track where he represents Agatha's anonymous brother. Her work, both in literature and in film, distinguishes itself by its oblique, elusive quality which evokes her protagonists' inner landscape instead of dwelling on the appearances of the external world.

Renate Günther

The preoccupation in Marguerite Duras with questions of gender and sexuality may be usefully theorised by drawing on ideas central to feminist psychoanalysis. While the creation of a female counter-cinema in Nathalie Granger enabled Duras to question dominant structures of representation, ultimately her films went beyond the dichotomies of gender and sexuality. Although, Nathalie Granger implicitly reproduces the conventional constructions of gender by creating separate 'masculine' and 'feminine' spheres, it can be seen that Duras was beginning to question and deconstruct all gender categories. In terms of feminist psychoanalytical theory, India Song questions the categories of gender and sexuality constructed by the patriarchal Symbolic order by foregrounding the Imaginary. Agatha mirrors transgressive relationship and quasi-incestuous adolescent relationship, as the film resonates with the off-screen voices of Duras and Yann Andréa who also appears on the image-track where he represents Agatha's anonymous brother.

in Marguerite Duras
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Urban hieroglyphics, patternings and tattoos in Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The tell-tale heart’ and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick; Or, the whale
Spencer Jordan

This chapter uses Henri Lefebvre’s concepts of ‘spatial code’ and ‘representational space’ to explore the transgressive relationship between body and city. In detective fiction, the city has often been represented as an arena of signs and secrets, what Laura Marcus has called ‘urban hieroglyphics’. The chapter considers both the physical movement or ‘patterning’ of bodies through the city and the tattoo as examples of spatial codes. It takes as its frame of reference the city of New York in the mid nineteenth century, a period that witnessed unprecedented expansion based on the gridiron symmetry of the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811. The chapter discusses how two literary works can be understood as responses to this unique urban phenomenon. Reading Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Tell Tale Heart’ (1843) and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851) as examples of detective fiction, the essay analyses how Lefebvre’s concept of ‘representational space’ offers a means of conceptualising the symbolic use of the tattoo within the genre.

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
Ménilmontant, Le Sang des bêtes, Colloque de chiens
Erik Bullot

predominant in the French criticism of the early 1950s. Neither Kirsanoff, Franju nor Ruiz are, as we have noted, particularly associated with the auteur tradition. In this regard, their transgressive relationship with genre aligns with the surrealist line of thinking. In this respect, the Paris suburbs – a margin marked by social disruption – act as an ideal projective screen by virtue of which it is possible to strive for a confusion of genres. The question remains to be asked of what status the suburbs gain throughout these varied manifestations. The headless body

in Screening the Paris suburbs
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Sport, leisure and identity
Alan Bairner

divide almost completely, as evidenced perhaps by Best’s funeral on 3 December 2005. They have done so, however, by representing different things to different constituencies.53 Similarly, fans are able to enter into cross-community, and therefore, in the general context of Northern Ireland, transgressive, relationships, particularly in relation to English Premiership football and aided by the global media and cheap flights. Beneath the veneer of communality, though, it is obvious that these fans remain divided in relation to the Celtic–Rangers rivalry in Scotland and

in Northern Ireland after the troubles
The portrayal of tattoos in Sarah Hall’s The electric Michelangelo and Alan Kent’s Voodoo pilchard
Hywel Dix

consumerism and hence to the dominant ideology of capitalism. The potential for the dominant ideology to incorporate emergent practices is most clearly illustrated by the novel’s foreclosure of the potential for revolutionary change. Voodoo pilchard is a parody of a gangster novel. 6 Although Porter suggests that parody can be a way of paying tribute to a genre (Porter 1981 : 2), the effect of parody in Voodoo pilchard seems to be that the portrayal of transgressive relationships uses itself up in generating comedy rather than being converted

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives