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Transnational dynamics in post-genocidal restitutions
Elise Pape

Taking its starting point from a socio-anthropological study combining biographical interviews, semi-structured interviews and ethnographic observations collected between 2016 and 2018 in Germany, France and the United States among Ovaherero and Nama activists, and also members of different institutions and associations, this article focuses on the question of human remains in the current struggle for recognition and reparation of the genocide of the Ovaherero and Nama from a transnational perspective. First, the text shows the ways in which the memory of human remains can be considered as a driving force in the struggle of the affected communities. Second, it outlines the main points of mismatches of perspective between descendants of the survivors and the responsible museums during past restitutions of human remains from German anthropological collections. Third, the article more closely examines the resources of Ovaherero in the United States in the struggle for recognition and reparation, the recent discovery of Namibian human remains in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City and the questions that it raises.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Author:

This monograph provides a history of popular media representations of Italian youth from 1958 to 1975, the period that is commonly regarded as marking the birth of a distinctive youth culture in Italy. Analysing youth-oriented media products such as teen magazines, Musicarelli films and television programmes, it explores the way in which a ‘youth’ category was constructed, contested and transformed in Italian popular culture. To do so, this study examines discourses around young people’s style and bodily practices: by looking at visual and written representations of trends conceived for a young audience, it investigates changes in the social construction of Italian youth’s political, generational, national, ethnic and gendered identity.

Fashioning Italian youth has three main objectives. First, it demonstrates how popular media contributed to identifying youth as a separate category in Italian society. The book traces a fundamental transformation from 1958 to the mid-1970s, namely the passage from the representation of a homogenous youth culture strongly influenced by global trends, to the fragmentation of this unitary construction, and the emergence of multiple Italian youth identities in the mid-1970s. Second, this monograph explores the relationship between media representations of Italian youth identity and the changing societal perceptions of youth in Italy during the 1960s and 1970s. The chronological analysis connects the emergence of different trends – such as the beat and the hippie trend – to historical accounts of youth culture nationally and globally. Third, this study explores the transnational dynamiThis monograph provides a history of popular media representations of Italian youth from 1958 to 1975, the period that is commonly regarded as marking the birth of a distinctive youth culture in Italy. Analysing youth-oriented media products such as teen magazines, Musicarelli films and television programmes, it explores the way in which a ‘youth’ category was constructed, contested and transformed in Italian popular culture. To do so, this study examines discourses around young people’s style and bodily practices: by looking at visual and written representations of trends conceived for a young audience, it investigates changes in the social construction of Italian youth’s political, generational, national, ethnic and gendered identity.

Fashioning Italian youth has three main objectives. First, it demonstrates how popular media contributed to identifying youth as a separate category in Italian society. The book traces a fundamental transformation from 1958 to the mid-1970s, namely the passage from the representation of a homogenous youth culture strongly influenced by global trends, to the fragmentation of this unitary construction, and the emergence of multiple Italian youth identities in the mid-1970s. Second, this monograph explores the relationship between media representations of Italian youth identity and the changing societal perceptions of youth in Italy during the 1960s and 1970s. The chronological analysis connects the emergence of different trends – such as the beat and the hippie trend – to historical accounts of youth culture nationally and globally. Third, this study explores the transnational dynamics that contributed to the construction of a specifically Italian youth culture.

Thomas D’haeninck
,
Jan Vandersmissen
,
Gita Deneckere
, and
Christophe Verbruggen

, among other things, the journal La technique sanitaire et municipale . 4 L’internationalisme médical hints at the importance of international influences on Belgian medicine and the intertwinement of Belgian social and medical initiatives in transnational dynamics. The (partially) Belgian contributions to medical internationalism mentioned by

in Medical histories of Belgium
Brendan Kane

and detailed; placing them within an understanding of Irish political world-views and understandings is a task still in need of doing. A highly productive and suggestive recent approach has been to frame these transnational dynamics in terms of sovereignty. Christopher Maginn has suggested that Gaelic and English-Irish courting of Continental kings for Ireland amounted to would-be ‘transfers of sovereignty’. 21 In doing so, he invites us to consider what exactly the Irish might have thought of as ‘sovereignty’ and the

in Political and religious practice in the early modern British world
Radical popular history and its readers
Nick Witham

: Sixties Radicalism, Now and Then,” in A New Insurgency: The Port Huron Statement and Its Times , ed. Howard Brick and Gregory Parker (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2015), 143–52. An excellent statement of the national and transnational dynamics at play in the American New Left is Doug Rossinow, “The New Left: The American Impress,” in Reframing 1968: American Politics, Protest and Identity , ed. Martin Halliwell and Nick Witham (Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press, 2018), 15–35. 4 For three useful accounts of this tradition, see Cedric Robinson

in Marxism and America
Fearghus Roulston

punk R’n’R’, but most of the Northern Irish bands she mentions maintained a sound and an aesthetic indebted to The Clash and other exemplars of ‘first wave’ punk. 5 This is a reminder of the need to maintain an awareness of geographical and temporal differentiations across the punk scene, but also a reminder of the transnational dynamics of the cultural memories analysed in the previous chapter. Secondly, Alison's emphasis on living in Dungannon foreshadows the importance of the specificities of

in Belfast punk and the Troubles
Material and symbolic effects
Sophie Haspeslagh

actors. It would be somewhat meaningless to try to separate the effects of the particular listings as if they operate in isolation. I agree with Boon-Kuo et al. ( 2015 :7) that listings need to be ‘analysed in relation to each other rather than in isolation as distinct jurisdictions’. Sullivan ( 2014 ) also makes the point that lists should be understood through their transnational dynamics

in Proscribing peace
Apollinaire in Freddy de Vree’s multilingual radiophonic composition A Pollen in the Air
Lars Bernaerts

reliance upon montage and collage. In this way, De Vree’s composition foregrounds the pure materiality of voices and languages – it is ‘music for words perhaps’, to allude to Marjorie Perloff’s reading of John Cage’s Roaratorio (1989) . Roaratorio and De Vree’s radio play are directly linked to James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake (1939), as we will see. This chapter untangles and contextualises these aspects of theme, form and intertextuality. On the one hand, the chapter demonstrates the intriguing continuity between the transnational dynamics of the institutional

in Tuning in to the neo-avant-garde
Abstract only
Timothy J. White

diaspora mobilization and the transnationalization of civil war’, in J. T. Checkel (ed.), The Transnational Dynamics of Civil War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013); Y. Shain, ‘The role of diasporas in conflict perpetuation or resolution’, SAIS Review, 22:2 (2002), 115–44. For the role of the Irish Diaspora in the US as a cause of conflict in Northern Ireland and later a force for peace, see B. Hanley, ‘The politics of NORAID’, Irish Political Studies, 19:1 (2004), 1–17; J. E. Thompson, ‘America’s role in the Northern Ireland peace process’, in J. DeWind and R

in Theories of International Relations and Northern Ireland
Abstract only
Europeanisation breakthrough
Boyka Stefanova

the AIA lacked a sustaining policy process and were not amenable to the institutionalisation of a European dimension to the conflict. Although such North–South executive and consultative bodies followed the principles of institutional creation in the EC, they did not induce significant transnational dynamics (Ruane and Todd 1996: 281, n. 37). The European perspective remained relevant to the

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution