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An anthology of literary texts and contexts

This book is an anthology of selections from works dealing with same-sex love, desire, sexual acts, and relationships during the period 1550-1735 in early modern England. It presents religious and moral writings, pseudo-medical writings, criminal pamphlets, travel writings, and letters on same-sex desire. The condemnation of male and female same-sex sexual acts is embedded in the earliest Christian theology. The early modern medical, pseudo-medical, and anatomical texts in Latin are surprisingly reticent about the physiological and anatomical aspects of homoerotic sexuality and desire. Canon law had long condemned male same-sex sexual acts. The 1533-34 statute in England forbade male same-sex sexual acts but ignored female same-sex intercourse. English travel narratives dealing with the sexual customs of other cultures often present sexual licentiousness as endemic, sometimes touching specifically on sodomy and tribadism. The most detailed presentations of same-sex erotic relationships in non-European cultures are those relating to Turkey and the Turkish seraglio. Familiar letters, such as between James I and VI, could reveal personal secrets and be radically transgressive in their emphasis on fostering love and desire. The book discusses homo-sexual subculture during 1700-1730, translation of Latin and Greek texts, and numerous literature representing male and female same-sex erotic relationships. The largely 'socially diffused homosexuality' of the seventeenth century changed profoundly with 'clothes, gestures, language' connoting 'homosexuality'. The book shows how literary genres of male same-sex and female-sex desires such as Shakespeare's Sonnets, and Catherine Trotter's Agnes de Castro allow the modern reader to chart changes in their representation.

Marie Helena Loughlin

of ‘homosexuality’ and ‘lesbianism’ has been the relationship between the early modern discourses of sodomy and tribadism and notions of early modern sexual identity. Sodomy constitutes the single most prevalent early modern discourse concerning male same-sex sexual acts, and tribadism the single most prevalent concerning female same-sex sexual acts.2 As a result, until very recently sodomy and as I do, more ‘neutral’ descriptors, such as ‘female and male same-sex relationships’, and are as careful as possible when delimiting the meanings of such vexed terms as

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
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Marie Helena Loughlin

ch a pt e r 4 Travel Writings Travel Writings Introduction English travel narratives that deal with the sexual customs of other cultures, particularly those of the New World and the East, often present sexual licentiousness as endemic, sometimes touching specifically on sodomy and tribadism. However, by far the most detailed presentations of same-sex erotic relationships in non-European cultures are those relating to Turkey and the Turkish seraglio, where both sodomy and tribadism are represented as springing from a rigidly observed and religiously mandated

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Rustam Alexander

Soviet expertise in sexology, which framed homosexuality as a matter of therapeutic concern, legal scholars arguing for decriminalisation of sodomy could rely on sexology’s findings to lend scientific credence to their arguments. That appears to be the case with Yakovlev’s arguments. The writing of his article coincided with the publication of Ivanov’s recent work, while previous arguments for sodomy decriminalisation as promoted by Ignatov and Osipov were grounded in outdated sources. ‘The author considers it necessary to criminalise tribadism’: Boris Daniel’bek and

in Regulating homosexuality in Soviet Russia, 1956–91
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Writing American sexual histories
Author: Barry Reay

The archive has assumed a new significance in the history of sex, and this book visits a series of such archives, including the Kinsey Institute’s erotic art; gay masturbatory journals in the New York Public Library; the private archive of an amateur pornographer; and one man’s lifetime photographic dossier on Baltimore hustlers. The subject topics covered are wide-ranging: the art history of homoeroticism; casual sex before hooking-up; transgender; New York queer sex; masturbation; pornography; sex in the city. The duality indicated by the book’s title reflects its themes. It is an experiment in writing an American sexual history that refuses the confines of identity sexuality studies, spanning the spectrum of queer, trans, and the allegedly ‘normal’. What unites this project is a fascination with sex at the margins, refusing the classificatory frameworks of heterosexuality and homosexuality, and demonstrating gender and sexual indecision and flexibility. And the book is also an exploration of the role of the archive in such histories. The sex discussed is located both in the margins of the archives, what has been termed the counterarchive, but also, importantly, in the pockets of recorded desire located in the most traditional and respectable repositories. The sexual histories in this book are those where pornography and sexual research are indistinguishable; where personal obsession becomes tomorrow’s archive. The market is potentially extensive: those interested in American studies, sexuality studies, contemporary history, the history of sex, psychology, anthropology, sociology, gender studies, queer studies, trans studies, pornography studies, visual studies, museum studies, and media studies.

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Queer theory, literature and the politics of sameness
Author: Ben Nichols

In its contributions to the study of material social differences, queer theoretical writing has mostly assumed that any ideas which embody 'difference' are valuable. More than this, where it is invoked in contemporary theory, queerness is often imagined as synonymous with difference itself. This book uncovers an alternative history in queer cultural representation. Through engagement with works from a range of queer literary genres from across the long twentieth century – fin-de-siècle aestheticism, feminist speculative fiction, lesbian middle-brow writing, and the tradition of the stud file – the book elucidates a number of formal and thematic attachments to ideas that have been denigrated in queer theory for their embodiment of sameness: uselessness, normativity, reproduction and reductionism. Exploring attachments to these ideas in queer culture is also the occasion for a broader theoretical intervention: Same Old suggests, counterintuitively, that the aversion they inspire may be of a piece with how homosexuality has been denigrated in the modern West as a misguided orientation towards sameness. Combining queer cultural and literary history, sensitive close readings and detailed genealogies of theoretical concepts, Same Old encourages a fundamental rethinking of some of the defining positions in queer thought.

Marie Helena Loughlin

pleasure rather than reproduction (Borris, Same-Sex 24, 26). Given Christianity’s conflicted representation of even marital, heterosexual intercourse and eroticism and its simultaneous valorization of virginity and sexual abstinence in texts such as Revelation 14.3–4 and 1 Corinthians 7.1, same-sex intercourse (sodomy and tribadism) was as a matter of course stringently condemned as one of those special ‘crying sins’1 so heinous that it brings upon its practitioners the immediate wrath of God. In short, same-sex intercourse, especially in its particular characterization

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Marie Helena Loughlin

from Onania’s readers to its anonymous author, outlining the medical problems springing from their habitual masturbation, followed by the author’s commentary. The following, the only letter dealing with female homoerotic intercourse, introduces a lengthy section on hermaphroditism and tribadism. Editions Onania, or, The Heinous Sin of Self-Pollution [with] A Supplement to the Onania. Facsimile edition. New York: Garland, 1986. 32 large … discipline  Flagellation often features in sexual encounters between women in early modern texts (cf. 9.16.1). 33 by reason

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Medicine masculinity, same-sex desire and the Gothic in Teleny
Diane Mason

the perverse practices which could lead to its breakdown. Admittedly, as Krafft-Ebing notes, those in same-sex communities – schoolchildren, prisoners and forces personnel – may take up mutual onanism, sodomy or tribadism owing to a lack of other sexual outlets. Nevertheless he maintains that in ‘the normally constituted, untainted , mentally healthy individual … No case has been demonstrated in

in Queering the Gothic
Marie Helena Loughlin

demonstrates, although on the Continent such legislation could indeed apply to female same-sex intercourse (tribadism) and heterosexual anal intercourse, in practice it applied largely to anal penetrative sex between men. Prosecutions for tribadism were vanishingly rare on the Continent and simply non-existent in England; while for heterosexual anal intercourse they were “relatively rare” (Same-Sex 76). More importantly, however, even though this statute and those which 59 Loughlin, Same-sex desire in early modern England.indd 59 18/12/2013 15:25:02 Same-Sex Desire in

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735