Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 32 items for :

  • "unequal exchange" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
How rich countries dominate in the twenty-first century
Author: Sam King

"Over a hundred years since the beginning of modern imperialism, the former colonial world is still prevented from joining the club of imperialist powers. The gap between rich and poor countries is not narrowing but growing. China is usually presented as challenging the dominance of the United States and other rich countries. However, imperialist domination over the most sophisticated aspects of the labour process gives the rich countries and their corporations control over the global labour process as a whole – including in China. Third World producers are forced to specialise in the opposite types of work – in relatively simple and low-end labour, for which major price markups and large profits are rarely possible. This is the kernel of unequal exchange in world trade. The imperialist system develops two types of capital – monopoly and non-monopoly capital – and two types of societies – rich, monopoly, imperialist societies and poor, non-monopoly, ‘Third World’ societies. China’s ascendance to become the most powerful Third World country in no way threatens to topple continuing imperialist dominance. Most contemporary Marxist writing has not been focused on global income polarisation and imperialist exploitation of the poor countries. For this reason, it has been unable to explain how exactly the same countries continuously reproduce their dominance. However, the actual conditions of the neoliberal world economy have made explicit how this happens through the labour process itself. In doing so it has also shown how Marx’s labour theory of value can be concretely applied to the conditions of monopoly capital today.

Sam King

‘assets’ (i.e. financial paper) certainly constitutes an important aspect of imperialist monopolistic advantage today. But that has long been the case. How exactly finance, conceived as a separate section of capital, can exert control over non-financial capital (which such a formulation must assume) remains a mystery. In overlooking unequal exchange in trade based on

in Imperialism and the development myth
Abstract only
Sam King

The neoliberal period reconfirmed the global polarisation inherent in the imperialist system. It also made the basic mechanism of Third World exploitation – unequal exchange – explicit and hence easier to explain and demonstrate. It has shown Lenin’s theory of monopoly finance capital is a basically accurate application, not negation, of Marx’s labour theory of value. For

in Imperialism and the development myth
Community engagement and lifelong learning
Author: Peter Mayo

In this broad sweep, Mayo explores dominant European discourses of higher education, in the contexts of different globalisations and neoliberalism, and examines its extension to a specific region. It explores alternatives in thinking and practice including those at the grassroots, also providing a situationally grounded project of university–community engagement. Signposts for further directions for higher education lifelong learning, with a social justice purpose, are provided.

Sam King

dictates the size of monopoly profit. This is the Marxist labour theory of unequal exchange. The case of Google versus Samsung via Motorola In 2014 Samsung produced the handsets for 81 per cent of the Android segment of the global mobile-phone market. Google, being the producer of Android, provided the operating system for 100 per cent of these. A great synergy on

in Imperialism and the development myth

This book is the first ever concordance to the rhymes of Spenser’s epic. It gives the reader unparalleled access to the formal nuts and bolts of this massive poem: the rhymes which he used to structure its intricate stanzas.

As well as the main concordance to the rhymes, the volume features a wealth of ancillary materials, which will be of value to both professional Spenserians and students, including distribution lists and an alphabetical listing of all the words in The Faerie Queene. The volume breaks new ground by including two studies by Richard Danson Brown and J. B. Lethbridge, so that the reader is given provocative analyses alongside the raw data about Spenser as a rhymer. Brown considers the reception of rhyme, theoretical models and how Spenser’s rhymes may be reading for meaning. Lethbridge in contrast discusses the formulaic and rhetorical character of the rhymes.

Enzo Mingione

the Second World War, the balance was financed by high growth rates and global unequal exchange so that democratic and welfare policies were able to alleviate the impact of inequalities (legal protection of minorities, progressive taxation, action against poverty, increasing social spending, etc.). However, this same balance cannot go on in the successive phase of capitalist development, and as Marshall already signalled in the early 1970s: This malfunctioning of the system of legitimate inequality is probably the most deeply-rooted threat to the viability of the

in Western capitalism in transition
Sam King

monopolistic manner. It is the monopolistic unequal exchange brought about on this basis that simply explains the apparent paradox that firms can raise profits by downsizing their operations. Polarisation and hierarchical specialisation among capitals ‘Globalisation’ of production processes is hardly new. As Lenin observed

in Imperialism and the development myth
Abstract only
Third World capitalism par excellence
Sam King

attract to itself a disproportionate share of global investment, contribute a disproportionate share of global labour, suffer a disproportionate unequal exchange of value and was able to develop, on that basis, a capitalist class that was disproportionately prosperous and powerful compared to other Third World capitalist classes. However as non-monopoly capital, its position is always

in Imperialism and the development myth
Sam King

Produces Stagnation and Upheaval from the USA to China ( New York , Monthly Review , 2012 ), p. 16 . 12 Foster et al., ‘The Global Reserve Army’; M. Itoh, ‘Unequal Exchange Reconsidered in Our Age of Globalization’ [talk presented at the

in Imperialism and the development myth