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Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

The account of cultural value provided by ministerial statements and groups of arts enthusiasts gives some indication of the difficulties involved in arriving at a stable definition of cultural value in twenty-first-century England. The value of selected examples of culture can be asserted, but the processes of evaluation in each case depends either on a consensus about the value

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Open Access (free)
Oonagh McDonald

8 Measuring Value Previous chapters have set out the ways in which Lehman Brothers sought to value its assets and to hide its losses. Professional standards for the valuation of commercial and residential real estate existed at that time, but as the bankruptcy Examiner Valukas demonstrates in his report, Lehman showed little interest in conforming to them or hiring those who knew how to apply them. Against that background it can be seen that the bankruptcy process did not itself cause the destruction of value, although it

in Lehman Brothers
Open Access (free)
Oonagh McDonald

9 Monitoring Value Corporate governance after 2002 The purpose of this chapter is to consider who should have been responsible for keeping an eye on the value of assets in which Lehman Brothers chose to invest heavily, and on its risk management procedures. Lehman's board, as any other board, would have been expected to monitor the company in accordance with corporate governance requirements. The first question therefore is: what exactly was the Lehman board expected, indeed, required to do. The other two questions are

in Lehman Brothers

This book quantifies international organizations’ affiliation with particular values in their constitutions, like cooperation, peace and equality. The statistical and legal analyses tease out from the data the actual values contained in international organizations’ constitutions and their relationship with one another. Values like cooperation, representation and communication often appear together in international organizations’ constitutions. However, divide these organizations into groups – like regional versus universal organizations – and a kaleidoscope of different patterns in these values emerges. In the kaleidoscope, the reader clearly can see distinct groupings of organizations and values. With data pointing the way, many new – and seemingly contradictory – interpretations of international organizations law emerge. Not only does this book provide a map of international organizations’ values, it provides a healthy start towards fully understanding that map, thereby helping global governance take a quantum leap forward.

Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

‘Shakespeare’ presents a particularly intractable example of the problem of value. As we saw in Chapter 1 , ‘Shakespeare’ 1 appears to be an incontestable location for value: even people who have little direct engagement with his plays in the theatre and have not read his plays since their school days are willing to agree that he is ‘a genius’, while those who are

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Abstract only
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

Narratives In Chapter 3 , we suggested that the eloquent account of value in Shakespeare’s plays can be redeployed in the twenty-first century, because the metaphors and analogies that the characters use bring together poetic images that represent enduring value – the pearl without price, the honour that will ‘greatly find quarrel in a straw

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Open Access (free)
Oonagh McDonald

6 The Destruction of Value The process of bankruptcy destroyed value Under its dramatic headline, ‘Lehman's chaotic bankruptcy filing destroyed billions in value’, the Wall Street Journal proclaimed that a ‘less hurried Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing would have preserved tens of billions of dollars of value’. A study carried out by the advisory firm Alvarez & Marsal argued that ‘an orderly filing would have enabled Lehman to sell some of its assets outside the federal court bankruptcy protections and would have given it

in Lehman Brothers
The Long Wait
Sarah Cardwell

consolidating and showcasing John Lewis's brand values cannot be overlooked. The primary objective of this chapter, however, is to explore the simplicity at the core of The Long Wait 's artistic and aesthetic achievements, and thereby to make a case for the value of simplicity as a potentially precious quality in television works. This chapter appraises The Long Wait in terms of its balance of simplicity and complexity, noting that it favours the former over the latter, and averring that here this is a virtue and not a failing. It recognises the skills

in Complexity / simplicity
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

ACE’s former slogan, which declared the organisation’s mission to get ‘great art to everyone’; and in Sir Brian McMaster’s report on the value of culture, which stressed the importance of balancing ‘excellence’ and ‘access’. All four of these cultural brokers readily promote the notion of an optimal ‘cultural value’ that comprises both high quality and wide reach

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Open Access (free)
Reading Beckett’s negativity
Peter Boxall

2 Nothing of value: reading Beckett’s negativity Peter Boxall The first section of Samuel Beckett’s novel Watt depicts Watt’s journey to and arrival at Mr Knott’s house, an establishment in which Watt is to feel for the first time in his life at rest. When Watt arrives at his destination and settles himself, like Beauty’s father enjoying the hospitality of the Beast, at Mr Knott’s kitchen table, he meets Knott’s manservant Arsene, whom he is to succeed in Mr Knott’s employment. As Arsene prepares to leave in order to make way for Watt, he delivers a long speech

in Beckett and nothing