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Mental distress, neoliberalism and COVID-19
Jana Fey

Introduction The concept of vulnerability came under increased scrutiny during the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. For a brief moment in time, everyone appeared potentially vulnerable to an unknown virus, our lives were ruptured, the lockdowns and forced isolation seemingly affected even the wealthy populations of Western countries. Yet

in Vulnerability
Merging social policy with the national security state
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

In the twenty-first century, ‘vulnerability’ has become central to the governance of security, migration, integration, social care and mental health. But what does it mean to govern through vulnerability? Perhaps, we might optimistically think, vulnerability signifies a new-found commitment to precarious lives on the part of policymakers. But if this is so, why do

in Vulnerability
Reimagining the ‘failing state’ problem through the international PVE agenda
Jan Daniel

about the role of armed non-state actors (Hazbun 2016 ; Mouawad 2017 ). Being traditionally open to various forms of external influence and located at the centre of several internationally relevant crises, there has not been a shortage of assessments of what makes Lebanon resilient or strong, or on the other hand vulnerable and weak, and what should be done with it. This chapter

in Vulnerability
From crime to radicalisation prevention in the Netherlands
Barbara Gruber

Deviant populations are increasingly governed through invocations of vulnerability. Vulnerability is transformative of social control interventions; it absolves deviants from blame, rendering them as deserving recipients of care, who are also sometimes in need of discipline. The governance of vulnerability has led to enhanced interventions in immigration

in Vulnerability
Andrew C. Fletcher
and
Ali Fuat Birol

national belonging’. As political apparatuses, detention centres (re)produce particular models of living together by identifying threats to the national body as that which is vulnerable to migrant incursion. These ‘threatening’ bodies, excluded from the ontological relationship between soil, body and temporality of nationalism, are then held in detention centres. And

in Vulnerability
Preventing farright extremism by curbing Roma ‘criminality and social pathologies’ in the Czech Republic
Sadi Shanaah

This chapter introduces a unique case of the vulnerability-minority-extremism configuration in the context of counter-extremism policy. Virtually all studies in the field of extremism, at least in the Anglophone world, deploy the term ‘vulnerability’ to mean susceptibility to radicalisation resulting into extremism and terrorism, which

in Vulnerability
Abstract only
Governing the social through security politics

In the twenty-first century, ‘vulnerability’ has become central to the governance of security, migration, integration, social care and mental health. But what does it mean to govern through vulnerability? We might optimistically think vulnerability signifies a new-found commitment to precarious lives on the part of policymakers. But why, then, do associated policy recommendations appear to transform welfare state provision – moving away from provision to those in need and towards the remoulding of subjects so that they do not become ‘costly’ or ‘risky’? This book responds to the rise of ‘vulnerability’ in the fields of public health, psychology, international security, political administration, post-colonial African and Middle Eastern politics, policing and migration. Across this policy landscape, we show that vulnerability has become central to the reinvention of social governance. Wherever policymakers wish to extend social control further into communities and their municipal structures, the language of vulnerability is used to appropriate the spaces previously administered by the welfare state. How is the language of vulnerability so powerful and transformative? At its core, ‘vulnerability’ implies a pre-emptive temporality – it is used to denote the potential for something negative to occur. The reorganisation of security and social policies around vulnerability works to centre a preventive, anticipatory temporality. The book is split into two parts: looking first at the transformation of the welfare state that brought risk and security logics into social policy. The second part explores how contemporary national security programmes appropriate the language and modalities of safeguarding and care.

Randi Gressgård
and
Vanja Lozic

Although resilience has only recently become a political keyword (Selchow 2017 ) in Swedish crime and violent radicalisation prevention, there is no denying that contemporary governing through vulnerability attests to a gradual turn away from ‘command and control’ approaches, in favour of interventions designed to cope with increasingly complex security threats (Gressgård

in Vulnerability
Laura Jung

. As a result of this ambiguity, the question of whose vulnerability welfare is designed to protect remains unresolved – social insurance may be deployed both to shield workers against destitution, but may equally be mobilised to secure the state against mounting threats from organised labour. This chapter explores this ambiguity in Germany, the first state to legislate

in Vulnerability
Re- bordering vulnerability and securitisation in UK public protection
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

In this chapter, I begin by exploring the framing of vulnerability in the UK’s Prevent strategy since 2011 – then move to analyse very recent developments in mental health professionals’ involvement in counterterrorism and public protection. The UK has been at the forefront of efforts to integrate mental health professionals into

in Vulnerability