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Learning from the case of Kosovo
Jenny H. Peterson

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 69 4 Transforming a war economy: learning from the case of Kosovo AVING BUILT up a preliminary framework in the previous chapter through which war economies and transformation policies can be assessed, the case of Kosovo and transformation policies implemented by the DSI following the conflict there will be analysed, not simply to test the framework but to build and improve upon it. As a starting point, it is important to note that the conflict in Kosovo has primarily been analysed in relation to

in Building a peace economy?
Current policy options and issues
Jenny H. Peterson

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 14 2 War economy transformation: current policy options and issues as a primary cause of a war, as one of several competing motivations to engage in violence, or simply an outcome of the supposed lawlessness that is characteristic of conflict, it is increasingly recognised that economic motivations create serious barriers to the resolution of war and the consolidation of peace. Not only a problem in terms of the causation, prolongation or intensity of conflict (Ballentine, 2003), these war

in Building a peace economy?
DSI approaches and behaviours
Jenny H. Peterson

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 162 8 The war economy transformation agenda: DSI approaches and behaviours AR ECONOMIES are resilient to small-scale, narrowly defined projects, their transformation requiring concerted and simultaneous engagement by and through a variety of actors, reforms and processes. This range of programmes, broadly referred to in this book as the transformation agenda, has been developed and is implemented by a diverse network of actors, the Development-Security Industry (DSI) who work at multiple levels in

in Building a peace economy?
Philip Ollerenshaw

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 07/25/2013, SPi 3 The war economy, 1941–45 Agriculture Despite a common perception that Northern Ireland was an industrial region, agriculture remained the largest single employer. As the Final Report of the Agricultural Enquiry Committee reminded its readers in 1947, ‘Agriculture is by a long way the largest and most extensive industry’ in Northern Ireland, ‘judged by the persons it supports directly and indirectly, by the scope and diversity of its operations, and by the volume and value of its products and exports’. The sector

in Northern Ireland in the Second World War
Liberal peacebuilding and the development-security industry

This book critically examines the range of policies and programmes that attempt to manage economic activity that contributes to political violence. Beginning with an overview of over a dozen policies aimed at transforming these activities into economic relationships which support peace, not war, the book then offers a sustained critique of the reasons for limited success in this policy field. The inability of the range of international actors involved in this policy area, the Development-Security Industry (DSI), to bring about more peaceful political-economic relationships is shown to be a result of liberal biases, resulting conceptual lenses and operational tendencies within this industry. A detailed case study of responses to organised crime in Kosovo offers an in-depth exploration of these problems, but also highlights opportunities for policy innovation. This book offers a new framework for understanding both the problem of economic activity that accompanies and sometimes facilitates violence and programmes aimed at managing these forms of economic activity. Summaries of key arguments and frameworks, found within each chapter, provide accessible templates for both students and aid practitioners seeking to understand war economies and policy reactions in a range of other contexts. It also offers insight into how to alter and improve policy responses in other cases. As such, the book is accessible to a range of readers, including students interested in peace, conflict and international development as well as policy makers and practitioners seeking new ways of understanding war economies and improving responses to them.

How Can Humanitarian Analysis, Early Warning and Response Be Improved?
Aditya Sarkar
,
Benjamin J. Spatz
,
Alex de Waal
,
Christopher Newton
, and
Daniel Maxwell

investigate how power operates within these political markets. It is a ‘realist’ theory in the sense that it takes the world ‘as it is’ rather than ‘as it ought to be’ and recognises that making progress toward the latter requires resolute confrontation with the former. It draws and builds on theories of war economies, greed versus grievance, patronage and corruption, patrimonialism, neopatrimonialism and rentier states, among others, and updates and reformulates these concepts

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Humanitarian Disruption in Conflict Settings
Maelle L’Homme

Sullivan, 2015 ). Nevertheless, a number of qualitative and quantitative studies conducted as early as in the 1990s highlighted some of the unintentional adverse consequences of humanitarian assistance, including the risk of aid becoming a resource in interstate and civil wars ( Keen, 1998 ; Anderson, 1999 ). Around that time, talk about ‘war economy’ revived old debates about belligerents’ diversion of the humanitarian windfall for war purposes leading to the prolongation of conflicts

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
How IPC Data is Communicated through the Media to Trigger Emergency Responses
François Enten

war economy, and its speculations, black markets, especially fuel. Then, the positions of ‘primary anti-Saudi’ journalists accusing Saudi Arabia of causing famine. Finally, the limited access of journalists to the country controlled by the Houthi authorities has allowed the UN to maintain its monopoly on narrative, with the media becoming a sounding board for facts and figures that are difficult to verify. Finally, this declaration and media coverage of the famine made it

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The nature of the development-security industry
Jenny H. Peterson

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 43 3 Explaining the dynamics of transformation: the nature of the development-security industry AKING INTO account the common themes emerging from analyses of policies and agendas aimed at tackling the problem of war economies, it is clear that both the nature and outcomes of the transformation agenda are determined by a number of interdependent processes. These processes are determined by the interests and beliefs of powerful actors, in this case the network of actors that determine and implement

in Building a peace economy?
Managing the criminal facets of war economies
Jenny H. Peterson

4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 85 5 Strengthening the rule of law: managing the criminal facets of war economies IVEN THAT much of the activity surrounding war economies is considered to occur in the criminal realm, strengthening the rule of law (RoL) has come to be seen as central to the DSI’s transformation agenda. In theory, effective investigation, capture and prosecution of criminal actors will help to dismantle ongoing links between illegal economic activities and political violence. Building up the RoL may also act as a

in Building a peace economy?