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Anne Tietjen
and
Gertrud Jørgensen

are increasingly at the forefront of political measures to address it. Such projects are partly publicly funded, for example by Leader or national funds for area renewal, but they are increasingly also funded by private charities. To sustain and enhance their community well-being, rural dwellers collectively initiate and implement projects in the built environment through such

in Rural quality of life
Comparing two survey waves (2008–2018)
Federica Viganò
,
Enzo Grossi
, and
Giorgio Tavano Blessi

Introduction Since the early 2000s, many disciplines have begun to examine urban and rural differences and to investigate the relationship between well-being and the degree of urbanisation of the place where individuals live. From sociologists to economists, from urban planners to psychologists and medical researchers, all are providing evidence

in Rural quality of life
Margret Fine-Davis

10 The effect of family status on well-being While much research has documented the major demographic changes that have been taking place in our society and in societies around us, little research has examined the effects of these changes on people’s well-being. A major focus of the present study was to examine the effect of family status, i.e. being single, married or cohabiting, on people’s well-being. In addition, we examined the effect of having or not having children on people’s well-being. The study included a wide range of measures of well-being, many

in Changing gender roles and attitudes to family formation in ireland
Insight from Scotland
Kathryn Colley
,
Margaret Currie
, and
Katherine N. Irvine

spaces as sites for healthy living, working, recreation and domestic food production (Weeden, 2020 ). As such, the natural environment has been implicated as a driver of higher levels of subjective well-being in rural areas (Gilbert et al., 2016 ; Verheij et al., 2008 ). However, simplistic narratives on the virtues of living in nature, which play into the nostalgic notion of the rural

in Rural quality of life
COVID-19 through the lens of moral geographies in two rural Colorado communities
Michael Carolan

Introduction This chapter is animated by a number of empirical tensions dealing with rural well-being. These tensions have been especially well documented in the US, the focus of this chapter. Yet I know they exist, and therefore complicate rural policy, in other countries (e.g. Almås & Fuglestad, 2020 ; Gallent & Gkartzios, 2019 ). For

in Rural quality of life
Marta Pasqualini

Introduction The difference between urban and rural areas, in terms of standard of living and subjective well-being, is still being debated. If, on one hand, cities offer higher job opportunities, leisure activities and cultural events, on the other hand, they are characterised by higher cost of living, higher levels of pollution and greater

in Rural quality of life
Henrik Lauridsen Lolle

Introduction In this chapter, we investigate the differences in subjective well-being between urban and rural areas in Denmark. We expect Denmark to be a good example of the reversing of the urban–rural gap in subjective well-being. As written in the framing essay to this section, in developing countries in general the level of subjective well-being

in Rural quality of life

The well-being of Europe’s citizens depends less on individual consumption and more on their social consumption of essential goods and services – from water and retail banking to schools and care homes – in what we call the foundational economy. Individual consumption depends on market income, while foundational consumption depends on social infrastructure and delivery systems of networks and branches, which are neither created nor renewed automatically, even as incomes increase. This historically created foundational economy has been wrecked in the last generation by privatisation, outsourcing, franchising and the widespread penetration of opportunistic and predatory business models. The distinctive, primary role of public policy should therefore be to secure the supply of basic services for all citizens (not a quantum of economic growth and jobs). Reconstructing the foundational has to start with a vision of citizenship that identifies foundational entitlements as the conditions for dignified human development, and likewise has to depend on treating the business enterprises central to the foundational economy as juridical persons with claims to entitlements but also with responsibilities and duties. If the aim is citizen well-being and flourishing for the many not the few, then European politics at regional, national and EU level needs to be refocused on foundational consumption and securing universal minimum access and quality. If/when government is unresponsive, the impetus for change has to come from engaging citizens locally and regionally in actions which break with the top down politics of ‘vote for us and we will do this for you’.

The infrastructure of everyday life

The well-being of Europe’s citizens depends less on individual consumption and more on their social consumption of essential goods and services – from water and retail banking to schools and care homes – in what we call the foundational economy. Individual consumption depends on market income, while foundational consumption depends on social infrastructure and delivery systems of networks and branches, which are neither created nor renewed automatically, even as incomes increase. This historically created foundational economy has been wrecked in the last generation by privatisation, outsourcing, franchising and the widespread penetration of opportunistic and predatory business models. The distinctive, primary role of public policy should therefore be to secure the supply of basic services for all citizens (not a quantum of economic growth and jobs). Reconstructing the foundational has to start with a vision of citizenship that identifies foundational entitlements as the conditions for dignified human development, and likewise has to depend on treating the business enterprises central to the foundational economy as juridical persons with claims to entitlements but also with responsibilities and duties. If the aim is citizen well-being and flourishing for the many not the few, then European politics at regional, national and EU level needs to be refocused on foundational consumption and securing universal minimum access and quality. If/when government is unresponsive, the impetus for change has to come from engaging citizens locally and regionally in actions which break with the top down politics of ‘vote for us and we will do this for you’.

Bringing together research on textual representations of various forms of positive feeling in early modern Europe, this collection of essays highlights the diverse and nuanced cultural meanings of happiness and well-being in this period, which is often characterized as a melancholy age. Interdisciplinary methodological approaches—informed by emotion studies, affect theory, and the contemporary cognitive sciences—provide various frames for understanding how the period cultivated and theorized positive emotions, as well as how those emotions were deployed in political, social, and intellectual contexts. Pointing to the ways the binary between positive and negative might be inadequate to describe emotive structures and narratives, the essays promote analysis of new archives and offer surprising readings of some texts at the center of the Renaissance canon. In addition to an introduction that provides an overview of work in contemporary studies of positive emotions and historical accounts of good feeling in early modern Europe, the book includes three sections: 1) rewriting discourses of pleasure, 2) imagining happy communities, and 3) forms, attachment, and ambivalence. The essays focus on works by such writers as Burton, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Traherne, and Webster, as well as on other kinds of texts circulating in the period. While focused on English writings, essays on continental writers contribute to a wider context for understanding these emotions as European cultural constructions. Finally, the volume offers windows onto the complex histories of happiness, well-being, humor, and embodiment that inform the ways emotions are experienced and negotiated in the present day.