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Scott Wilson

5 X-essence of the wigga It always seems that I’m dreaming of something that I can never be, I will always be that pimp that I see in all of my fantasies (Korn, ‘A.D.I.D.A.S’, 1996) $ For gangsta rappers, referring only to the experience of everyday life in the ‘hood is illusory, since the records also provide the point of mediation between minority and majority cultures. Gangsta, particularly in the form of NWA, Easy E, Ice Cube, Dr. Dre and Snoop Doggy Dogg provides a commentary on the absence of a relation between these cultures, the fact that white and

in Great Satan’s rage
American negativity and rap/metal in the age of supercapitalism
Author: Scott Wilson

The seductive force of American supercapitalism unlocks new markets, unleashing the energy of desire, and provides a destructive version of Satan's rage. At the vanguard of this seduction has been the youthful rage and rebellion of the devil's music, American rock 'n' roll and its multiple related subgenres. This book looks at the most pervasive forms of American popular music in the post-cold-war period. Gangsta rap exploits and informs the consumption of luxury brands. The 'mom and pop rage' of the nu metal bands self-consciously exposes itself as the violent expression, the excess of the implacable banal excess, and of shopping-mall consumerism. The book explores the negativity and the 'niggativity' of American rap/metal in the 1990s in relation to a number of key events in the decade such as the Rodney King riots and the Columbine High School massacre. On the face of it, the gangsta 'nigga' is an unlikely point of identification for suburban white culture. But the phenomenon of the 'wigga' (white, wanna-be-nigga) and the success of companies like Nike testify to the fascination that such a figure holds. Rage Against the Machine (also known as Rage or RATM) do not normally have problems with machines, indeed their music and living depend upon them. Rather, the 'machine' is for Rage another word for the new world order of global capitalism. Death metal groups such as Morbid Angel and Deicide aim to outdo the others in its singular relation to death, shock and outrage.

Abstract only
Scott Wilson

/her affirmation of all the most lurid luxuries, the bling, that consumer capitalism has to offer. On the face of it, the gangsta ‘nigga’ is an unlikely point of identification for suburban white culture, and yet the phenomenon of the ‘wigga’ (white, wanna-be-nigga) and the success of companies like Nike testify to the fascination that such a figure holds. Nike has sought to transcend the cynicism with which much of consumer culture is regarded through appealing directly to the authenticity that is granted to African-American culture, an authenticity that is grounded in, and

in Great Satan’s rage
Abstract only
Scott Wilson

’ (Tarantino, 1995a: 8). His colleague Floyd is nonplussed: ‘Hold on a second Big D. You sayin’ you eat pussy?’ Big D not only confirms that this is the case but testifies that his appetite is all-American in its capacity: ‘Nigger, I eat everything. I eat the pussy. I eat the butt. I eat every motherfuckin’ thang’ (8). The boast fails to impress Floyd, however, who sees it as yet another sign of black male humiliation. Indeed, taking a historical view, he lays the blame on white men. Addressing Floyd and another (white) pimp, the wigga Drexl, Floyd makes the following speech

in Great Satan’s rage