Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13,712 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
A critical exploration
Editor:

Whilst many women surrealists worked across different media such as painting, sculpture, photography, and writing, contemporary historiographies have tended to foreground the visual aspects of this oeuvre. Featuring original essays by leading scholars of surrealism, Surrealist Women’s Writing: A Critical Exploration offers the first sustained critical inquiry into the writing of women associated with surrealism. The volume aims to demonstrate the extensiveness and the historical, linguistic, and culturally contextual breadth of this writing, as well as to highlight how the specifically surrealist poetics and politics that characterise these writers’ work intersect with and contribute to contemporary debates on, for example, gender, sexuality, subjectivity, xenophobia, anthropocentrism, and the environment.

Drawing on a variety of innovative theoretical approaches, the essays in the volume focus on the writing of a number of women surrealists, many of whom have hitherto mainly been known for their visual rather than their literary production: Claude Cahun, Leonora Carrington, Kay Sage, Colette Peignot, Suzanne Césaire, Unica Zürn, Ithell Colquhoun, Leonor Fini, Dorothea Tanning and Rikki Ducornet.

Surrealist Women’s Writing: A Critical Exploration offers an important resource for scholars and students across the fields of modernist literature, the historical avant-garde, literary and visual surrealism and its legacies, feminism, and critical theory.

Abstract only
Labour, gender, authorship, 1750–1830

This book challenges influential accounts about gender and the novel by revealing the complex ways in which labour informed the lives and writing of a number of middling and genteel women authors publishing between 1750 and 1830. It provides a seam of texts for exploring the vexed relationship between gender, work and writing. The four chapters that follow contain contextualised case studies of the treatment of manual, intellectual and domestic labour in the work and careers of Sarah Scott, Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft and women applicants to the writers' charity, the Literary Fund. By making women's work visible in our studies of female-authored fiction of the period, the book reveals the crucial role that these women played in articulating debates about the gendered division of labour, the (in)compatibility of women's domestic and professional lives, and the status and true value of women's work, which shaped eighteenth-century culture as surely as they do our own.

Open Access (free)
Sex, family planning and British female doctors in transnational perspective, 1920–70

Women’s medicine explores the key role played by British female doctors in the production and circulation of contraceptive knowledge and the handling of sexual disorders between the 1920s and 1970s at the transnational level, taking France as a point of comparison. This study follows the path of a set of women doctors as they made their way through the predominantly male-dominated medical landscape in establishing birth control and family planning as legitimate fields of medicine. This journey encompasses their practical engagement with birth control and later family planning clinics in Britain, their participation in the development of the international movement of birth control and family planning and their influence on French doctors. Drawing on a wide range of archived and published medical materials, this study sheds light on the strategies British female doctors used, and the alliances they made, to put forward their medical agenda and position themselves as experts and leaders in birth control and family planning research and practice.

‘For women’ but not by women
Elizabeth Evans

05_Gender_Lib_Dems_105-127 15/12/10 09:06 Page 105 5 Women’s substantive representation: ‘for women’ but not by women The substantive representation of women refers to the representation of women’s interests. This chapter considers how and in what ways the party substantively represents women. Whilst previous research has highlighted the importance of looking at who acts, or claims to act, for women, this analysis of the Liberal Democrats also provides a useful case study for exploring the substantive representation of women by men. From a normative

in Gender and the Liberal Democrats
Author:

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Bronagh Hinds

This chapter examines the challenges facing women who want to participate in politics in Northern Ireland and touches upon the relationship between women inside and outside politics. Women constantly run up against socially conservative attitudes and face residual and overt misogyny and resistance to specific measures for change, including at times

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
State-based institutions to advocate for gender equality
Anne Marie Goetz

3 National women’s machinery: state-based institutions to advocate for gender equality1 anne marie goetz Introduction This chapter considers the effectiveness of National women’s machineries (NWMs), examining their record of promoting women’s interests in five countries: Bangladesh, Chile, Jamaica, Morocco and Vietnam.2 These countries are each at different stages of integrating gender into development processes. They also differ in their degree of economic development, their political histories and the nature of their main economic constraints. What they have

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Structures and spaces
Nüket Kardam
and
Selma Acuner

96 COMPARATIVE ANALYSES 4 National women’s machineries: structures and spaces nüket kardam and selma acuner Introduction This chapter will focus on the ‘lessons learned’ by national machineries in mainstreaming gender issues, drawing from our experience of the Turkish national women’s machinery (NWM) as well as other published case studies. As we enter the twenty-first century, we have seen a number of institutional changes for gender equality. National machineries have been established, restructured, streamlined and upgraded in an effort to promote gender

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Roger Sabin

Duval's female characters present a puzzle. If we ask whether she was a women's cartoonist, this points to several supplementary questions. Was her work aimed at a female readership, and did she emphasise ‘female issues’ and female characters? (After all, must not there be a difference between strips and cartoons that happen to have been drawn by a woman, and ‘women's cartooning’, which purposefully concerns itself with the expression of women's experience?) And was she ‘for women’ in the sense of being pro-women's rights? In other words, was

in Marie Duval