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For women writers, the decades of the English Civil War were of special importance. This book presents a complex and rewarding poetic culture that is both uniquely women-centred and integrally connected to the male canonical poetry. It brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. All these five women were attracting new and concerted attention as poets by seventeenth-century women. Bradstreet's poems first appeared in The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America, and the later volume of Several Poemsincluded revised texts of those poems and several new ones. Each version of the poems spoke more directly on the context of the English Civil War. Pulter's poems construe Broadfield as a place of unwelcome isolation: she describes herself as 'shut up in a country grange', 'tied to one habitation', and 'buried, thus, alive'. Philips's poetry was first printed in 1664, her state-political poems, on members of the royal family and events of the Civil War, Interregnum, and Restoration, suggest Philips as a poet writing on matters of political significance. Cavendish's two major editions of Poems and Fancies in 1653 and 1664 each have strongly competing claims both to textual authority and to the more resonant political moment. Across poetry and prose, print and manuscript, Hutchinson's writing bears the marks of her fervent hostility to corrupt rulers and her remarkably broad education, adventurous reading habits, and energetic intellect.

Genre and literary tradition in Katherine Philips’s early poetry
Gillian Wright

Chapter 4 Women poets and men’s sentences: genre and literary tradition in Katherine Philips’s early poetry Gillian Wright There is no reason to think that the form of the epic or of the poetic play suit a woman any more than the sentence suits her. But all the older forms of literature were hardened and set by the time she became a writer.1 I n A Room of One’s Own (1929), Virginia Woolf meditated on the difficulties faced by women of earlier centuries in trying to imagine themselves into English literary tradition. For Woolf, these difficulties were

in Early modern women and the poem
Margaret J. M. Ezell

Chapter 8 Late seventeenth-century women poets and the anxiety of attribution Margaret J. M. Ezell High-born Belinda loves to blame; On criticism founds her fame: Whene’er she thinks a fault she spies, How pleasure sparkles in her eyes! ‘Call it not poetry,’ she says, ‘No – call it rhyming, if you please: Her numbers might adorn a ring, Or serve along the streets to sing…’ Mary Barber, ‘To a Lady, who commanded me to send her an Account in Verse, how I succeeded in my Subscription’ (1734) A nne Killigrew’s literary reputation, as critics have pointed out, has

in Early modern women and the poem
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Ashley Cross

‘Writing Pain’ argues that Anna Seward‘s Letters (1811) and Mary Robinson‘s letters (1800) create alternative models of sensibility from the suffering poet of Charlotte Smith‘s Elegiac Sonnets. Immensely popular, Smith‘s sonnets made feminine suffering a source of poetic agency by aestheticizing and privatizing it. However, despite their sincerity, her sonnets effaced the physical, nervous body of sensibility on which Seward‘s and Robinsons early poetic reputations had depended and for which they had been mocked. The popularity of Smith‘s model made it an important model for women poets, but, by the end of the eighteenth century, sensibility was also associated with sickness and artifice. For Seward and Robinson, who wanted to build their literary reputations but were living with disabled bodies, Smiths example needed to be reimagined to account for the reciprocity of body and mind as they struggled to write through pain.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Abstract only
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

Introduction Women poets of the English Civil War This anthology brings together extensive selections of poetry by the five most prolific and prominent women poets of the English Civil War: Anne Bradstreet, Hester Pulter, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Philips, and Lucy Hutchinson. Some of these women are more familiar to students and teachers than others. Katherine Philips and Margaret Cavendish have enjoyed fame (or endured notoriety) as women poets since the first publication of their work in the 1650s and 1660s, and brief selections of their poems have

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Sarah C.E. Ross and Elizabeth Scott-Baumann

in their spelling and punctuation, including capitalisation and the use of i/j and u/v. The layout of lines and stanzas has been regularised. Annotations on the page are explanatory, being designed to facilitate an informed understanding of the poems. More specialised textual notes are found here at the back of the volume. 317 Women poets of the English Civil War While the texts in this anthology are modernised, we have not abandoned an interest in the poems’ conditions of production and in the contexts in which they originally occurred. Each set of poems is

in Women poets of the English Civil War
Open Access (free)
Representations of the house in the poetry of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Vona Groarke
Lucy Collins

emptiness is impossible, since the speaking self must be meaningfully located. Space, both public and private, is closely related to the construction of identity and to its textual representation. This chapter examines the representation of the house by two contemporary women poets, arguing that the relationship between the speaking subject and the space of dwelling – and of writing – is a complex and contingent one. By examining poems from collections by Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin and Vona Groarke published since the early 1990s, the differing responses that the established

in Irish literature since 1990
Lucy Hutchinson and the classicisation of scripture
Edward Paleit

Chapter 1 Women’s poetry and classical authors: Lucy Hutchinson and the classicisation of scripture Edward Paleit Introduction: the distant muses – early modern women poets and classical antiquity E arly modern women poets’ search for cultural authority and poetic  voice involved a vexed, sometimes contradictory relationship to literary models (as Sarah Ross and Line Cottegnies explore further in chapters 2 and 3). Classical poetry was especially awkward for women writers to accommodate and imitate, for a variety of social and cultural reasons. Greek and

in Early modern women and the poem
Anne Woolley

-century women poets when permission to write was not always granted. Penning Sappho’s last words they gave themselves that permission even if they are then killing her to assure their own literary survival. 14 L. E. L., Hemans, Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti and Caroline Norton were all drawn to Sappho’s fragments in gestures of absorption and imitation, beginning what would be a long tradition of appropriating her poetry and her persona to explore the issues and anxieties behind female creativity and erotic experience. 15 ‘Sappho’ (1822) by L. E. L. uses a mixture

in The poems of Elizabeth Siddal in context