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Author: Hugo Frey

This book introduces readers to the cinema of Louis Malle. Malle needs little further preliminary discussion here. His is a body of work that most film critics around the world recognise as being one of the most productive in post-war international cinema, including as it does triumphs such as Ascenseur pour l'échafaud; Le Feu follet; Lacombe Lucien; Atlantic City USA, and Au revoir les enfants . Malle's work attracted intense public controversy, with a new Malle film being just as likely to find itself debated on the front page of Le Monde or Libération as reviewed in the film section of those newspapers. Malle's four major films of the 1970s represent a fusion of the youthful bravado and confidence of the 1950s combined with the new political questioning adopted in the late 1960s. Le Souffle au cœur, Lacombe Lucien, Black Moon, and Pretty Baby were made in relatively quick succession and each engaged in controversial and divisive themes. The book analyses Malle's political journey from the cultural right-wing to the libertarian left, to explain how Le Souffle au cœur marked a radical break with the 1950s by speaking of that era through a comic mode. It explores how Lacombe Lucien works as a film, to discuss its core rhetorical devices and what they mean today. The book also demonstrates that Malle is too complex to be explained by one theory or interpretation, however tempting its conclusions.

Hugo Frey

Malle underwent from ambiguous New Wave playboy to ‘soixante-huitard’ radical went considerably beyond the level of style and form. Four provocations from the 1970s Malle’s four major films of the 1970s can be read as a synthesis of his earlier work. They represent a fusion of the youthful bravado and confidence of the 1950s combined with the new political questioning adopted in the late 1960s. Le Souffle

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Catherine Ladds

’s youthful bravado encapsulated a recurrent motif in colonial discourse: the effortless mastery of foreign landscapes by Europeans. The motif of European masculine physical prowess enabling and legitimising the conquest of hostile peoples and environments was central to a host of adventure stories and travelogues published in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 47 Europeans in China, consciously or unconsciously

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The Servant (1963), Accident (1967) and The Go-Between (1971)
Colin Gardner

midriff, leaving him uncomfortably aroused. Then, as if in challenge to William’s graceful handling of the punt, Stephen responds with a demonstration of his own youthful bravado by standing up in the boat. Alas, while grabbing for the overhanging branch of a tree he falls in the river, once more underlining his declining physical skills. Significantly, Stephen’s subjective narration of the incident only

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