Road Trips, Globalisation, and the War on Terror
Kyle William Bishop

American zombie Gothic films have changed markedly in their tone, style, and structure since September 11, an evolution that expands the Gothic mode to include the mobility of the narratives protagonists, a popularisation of the movies, and an increased engagement with a multi-ethnic international community. To remain timely, relevant, and commercially viable, such alterations must occur, and these shifts in particular can best be explained by the changing cinematic marketplace, the influence of videogames, and the policies and anxieties resulting from the (inter)national trauma of 9/11 and the War on Terror. This essay examines the film version of World War Z as a key text for exploring the current transition from a localised siege narrative to an international kind of road trip movie, a shift largely tied to the popularity of zombie-themed videogames.

Gothic Studies
A Rendering of True Monstrosity
Angela Tenga and Elizabeth Zimmerman

Many vampires in popular fiction have developed a conscience that mitigates their monstrosity and makes them objects of human love and admiration. With the advent of the reformed vampire, Western culture has, perhaps, lost an icon of true horror. As the vampire has become increasingly humanized and sympathetic, the zombie has stepped up to take its place. Zombies remind us that we will soon be decomposing flesh; the zombie horde embodies fear of loss of self and individuality; zombies expose the dark side of mass consumer culture; and zombies highlight the fragility of human identity in an advanced, globalised society.

Gothic Studies
Justin D. Edwards

With reference to films such as The Terror Experiment (2010) and Osombie (2012), this paper explores the figure of the zombie terrorist, a collectively othered group that is visually identifiable as not us and can be slaughtered with impunity. In cinematic treatments, the zombie terrorist operates within a collectivity of zombies, erasing the possibility of individuality when the transformation from human to zombie takes place. The zombie terrorist signifies otherness in relation to selfhood, and is characterised by a mind/body split. Emerging from the grave in the archetypal zombie primal scene, this reanimated corpse is undead in its animate corporeality coupled with a loss of all mental faculties. The erasure of individual identity and memory along with broader human characteristics such as empathy or willpower coincides with the zombie terrorist s physical movement and action.

Gothic Studies
Jack Holland

of this discussion for a range of debates are significant; you only need to think about controversial topics such as abortion or humanitarian intervention to realise that. Zombies have long been a prevalent genre in film and graphic novels, and throughout popular culture. But The Walking Dead has brought them into our living rooms on a weekly basis, over a prolonged storyline. Through the popular trope of the zombie apocalypse, The Walking Dead has slowly desensitised its audience to grotesque and spectacular violence, in much the same manner as its central

in Fictional television and American Politics
Generic hybridity and gender crisis in British horror of the new millennium
Linnie Blake

6 Zombies, dog men and dragons: generic hybridity and gender crisis in British horror of the new millennium Horror thrives best when emotions are bottled up and nobody bottles them up quite like us.1 For over twenty years British horror cinema has been characterised by a will to generic hybridity, as earlier film texts and genres are endlessly worked and re-worked as a means of exploring the traumatic legacy that Thatcherite machismo bequeathed to those who grew either to hyper-masculine empowerment or economic and political emasculation in its shadow. Standing

in The wounds of nations
Black Power and the transformation of the Caribbean Artists Movement
Rob Waters

editor and producer (from 1946 to 1954) of BBC radio’s Caribbean Voices , a man who had contributed immeasurably to the development of West Indian literature and to the destabilisation of ‘correct forms’ of English as the proper artistic medium in metropole and colony, 3 chose to deliver his address in a green, grey and black tie. ‘I’ve put on a zombie tie, really, or at

in Cultures of decolonisation
Neoliberalism, Zombies and the Failure of Free Trade
Linnie Blake

The popular cultural ubiquity of the zombie in the years following the Second World War is testament to that monster‘s remarkable ability to adapt to the social anxieties of the age. From the red-scare zombie-vampire hybrids of I Am Legend (1954) onwards, the abject alterity of the ambulant dead has been deployed as a means of interrogating everything from the war in Vietnam (Night of the Living Dead, 1968) to the evils of consumerism (Dawn of the Dead, 1978). This essay explores how, in the years since 9/11, those questions of ethnicity and gender, regionality and power that have haunted the zombie narrative since 1968 have come to articulate the social and cultural dislocations wrought by free-market economics and the shock doctrines that underscore the will to global corporatism. The article examines these dynamics through consideration of the figure of the zombie in a range of contemporary cultural texts drawn from film, television, graphic fiction, literature and gaming, each of which articulates a sense not only neo-liberalism itself has failed but simply wont lie down and die. It is therefore argued that in an age of corporate war and economic collapse, community breakdown and state-sanctioned torture, the zombie apocalypse both realises and works through the failure of the free market, its victims shuffling through the ruins, avatars of the contemporary global self.

Gothic Studies
Reification of the Mothers Role in the Gothic Landscape of 28 Days Later
G. Christopher Williams

As its title suggests, Danny Boyle‘s 28 Days Later is a zombie movie about procreation. While this idea – a human menstrual cycle alluding to the multiplication of the undead – may seem at first to be paradoxical, such an idea is hardly a new one in zombie mythology. Boyle‘s film borrows from the traditional Gothic through a number of standard Gothic tropes in order to define the character of the films female protagonist as one necessary for her biological or reproductive role and to ward off possible domestic chaos and invasion through her role as mother. The film acknowledges an idea of woman as objectified and violated in both a postfeminist, but strangely also traditionally Gothic definition of woman as sex object and mother who is necessary for this biological, reproductive role as well as her identity, not as survivor, but as domestic caretaker.

Gothic Studies
Johan Höglund

This essay argues that Stephen King‘s 2006 novel Cell explores the age of terror with the aid of two concurrent Gothic discourses. The first such discourse belongs to the tradition that Patrick Brantlinger has termed Imperial Gothic. As such, it imagines with the War on Terror that the threat that the (Gothic) Other constitutes is most usefully managed with the help of massive, military violence. The other, and more traditional, Gothic discourse radically imagines such violence as instead a War of Terror. The essay then argues that Cell does not attempt to reconcile these opposed positions to terror. Instead, the novel employs the two Gothic discourses to describe the epistemological rift that terror inevitably creates.

Gothic Studies
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

.1080/02561751.1940.9676107 . Gomez-Temesio , V. ( 2018 ), ‘ Outliving Death: Ebola, Zombies, and the Politics of Saving Lives ’, American Anthropologist , 120 , 738 – 51 , doi: 10.1111/aman.13126 . Gomez-Temesio , V. and Le Marcis , F. ( 2017 ), ‘ La mise en camp de la Guinée. Ebola et l

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs