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Series:

Alice Marples

scholarly collectors, such as Sloane. As shall be demonstrated, this is partly because of the general ways in which medical communities functioned in Britain and Ireland in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. But it was also partly because the collection and circulation of natural knowledge took on a new epistemological value during this period. Circulating information in medical communities The intellectual and practical limitations facing physicians across Britain and Ireland between 1680 and 1750

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The collector as taste advisor and interior decorator

Popular advice manuals and the orchestration of the private interior

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Anca I. Lasc

The collector as taste advisor and interior decorator 1 The collector as taste advisor and interior decorator: popular advice manuals and the orchestration of the private interior In or around 1892, the architect and decorator (architecte décorateur) Georges Rémon (c. 1853/1854–1931) proposed the inclusion of a reproduction after Venus de Milo (a late second­-century BC original) right next to one after the Florentine sculptor Giambologna’s Mercury (original of c. 1565) within a room decorated in the style of the Renaissance (Plate 1).1 Reproduced in Rémon

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Edited by: John Cunningham

This collection offers important new insights across a broad range of topics relating to medicine in Early Modern Ireland. Of particular note is the substantial attention devoted to the years before 1750, a period that has been relatively neglected in studies of Irish medicine. The book brings together an exciting selection of established scholars, such as Peter Elmer and Clodagh Tait, as well as a number of early career historians. Their work effectively situates Irish medicine in relation to long-term social and cultural change on the island, as well as to appropriate international contexts, encompassing Britain, Europe and the Atlantic World. The chapters also engage in various ways with important aspects of the historiography of medicine in the twenty-first century. Among the key subjects addressed by the contributors are Gaelic medicine, warfare, the impact of new medical ideas, migration, patterns of disease, midwifery and childbirth, book collecting, natural history, and urban medicine. A common thread running through the chapters is the focus on medical practitioners. The book accordingly enables significant new understanding of the character of medical practise in Early Modern Ireland. This collection will be of interest to academics and students of the history of Early Modern medicine. It also contains much that will be essential reading for historians of Ireland.

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Henry A. McGhie

5 Collecting I n previous chapters, we have seen how Dresser began his collecting career by  shooting his own birds and searching for nests containing eggs,. This chapter explores the various sources, and tactics, that he and other ornithologist-collectors used to take their collecting to new heights. In the early days of his ornithological career, when Dresser was an avid field collector, he was usually keen that birds had ‘a sporting chance’, but he was not beyond killing birds on a grand scale or ‘breaking the rules’ of fair play in order to obtain a rare

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Interior decorating in nineteenth-century France

The visual culture of a new profession

Series:

Anca I. Lasc

This book analyzes the early stages of the interior design profession as articulated within the circles involved in the decoration of the private home in the second half of nineteenth-century France. It argues that the increased presence of the modern, domestic interior in the visual culture of the nineteenth century enabled the profession to take shape. Upholsterers, cabinet-makers, architects, stage designers, department stores, taste advisors, collectors, and illustrators, came together to “sell” the idea of the unified interior as an image and a total work of art. The ideal domestic interior took several media as its outlet, including taste manuals, pattern books, illustrated magazines, art and architectural exhibitions, and department store catalogs.

The chapters outline the terms of reception within which the work of each professional group involved in the appearance and design of the nineteenth-century French domestic interior emerged and focus on specific works by members of each group. If Chapter 1 concentrates on collectors and taste advisors, outlining the new definitions of the modern interior they developed, Chapter 2 focuses on the response of upholsterers, architects, and cabinet-makers to the same new conceptions of the ideal private interior. Chapter 3 considers the contribution of the world of entertainment to the field of interior design while Chapter 4 moves into the world of commerce to study how department stores popularized the modern interior with the middle classes. Chapter 5 returns to architects to understand how their engagement with popular journals shaped new interior decorating styles.

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Collecting empire?

African objects, West African trade and a Liverpool museum

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Zachary Kingdon and Dmitri van den Bersselaar

part with the objects, or demanded a price that traders considered too high. At other times, traders got what they wanted, but did not understand what they were getting, for example when they purchased ‘ritual’ artefacts that had been produced specifically for sale to European collectors. It thus appears that nineteenth and early twentieth-century European knowledge of African material culture was

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Henry A. McGhie

their eggs if they could. Scientific socialising Those with a taste for natural history came together in a variety of social settings. By the time he was seventeen, Dresser was attending natural history auctions at Stevens’ Rooms in King Street, Covent Garden, the leading natural history auctioneers in Britain. Auctions were an important place for young collectors to get their faces known and to mix with their elders. Lord Walter Rothschild (whose life is explored in chapter 11), an avid collector and 64 Dresser.indb 64 03/10/2017 12:48:56 Early exploits in

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Henry A. McGhie

method of elocution and the words poured from his mouth and almost stunned his audience. He was in fact quite a character in an age of individualism. He possessed vast ambitions and was visibly proud of his achievements in ornithology.   A born collector, he would converse on birds for hours to the exclusion of all other topics and he was most ambitious in acquiring valuable eggs, [bird] skins, and other rare specimens. (Manson-Bahr, 1959: 59) Dresser was one of the prime movers in ornithology; he witnessed and played a part in many of the transformations that took

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‘Something on which you may exercise your ingenuity’

Diamonds and curious collectables in the fin-de-siècle fiction of Richard Marsh

Series:

Jessica Allsop

–object relations, the terms of which are dictated by the objects. Diamonds, Empire and mythology Experts and collectors discoursing on diamonds in the 1860s and 1870s wrote from a position of confidence in the commercial and symbolic value of these precious stones.5 Without engraving, cut and uncut, diamonds were valued above other stones for their hardness, clarity and homogeneity.6 In the fin-de-siècle consciousness, however, diamonds were subject to variations in physical characteristics and provenance, which altered their perception and value and questioned their presumed

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Series:

Daniel Orrells

medieval artefacts.4 The professionalisation of sciences such as geology and anthropology also fostered other sorts of collections. It is hardly surprising, then, that a particular vocabulary to describe objects developed at this time in French that then found its way into English. ‘Bibelot’ entered the English language in the early 1870s, as did ‘bric-abrac’ (also from the French), and words like ‘curio’ in the 1840s and 1850s, when the market of collectors was opening up. By the 1880s, the difference between ‘the museum-worthy heirloom’ and ‘the mass-produced trinket