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Edited by: Diana Holmes and David Looseley

This book, which is about what ‘popular culture’ means in France, and how the term's shifting meanings have been negotiated and contested, represents a theoretically informed study of the way that popular culture is lived, imagined, fought over and negotiated in modern and contemporary France. It covers a wide range of overarching concerns: the roles of state policy, the market, political ideologies, changing social contexts and new technologies in the construction of the popular. But the book also provides a set of specific case studies showing how popular songs, stories, films, TV programmes and language styles have become indispensable elements of ‘culture’ in France. Deploying yet also rethinking a ‘Cultural Studies’ approach to the popular, it therefore challenges dominant views of what French culture really means today.

Open Access (free)

Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

informed by past colonial relationships. In each of the three countries, humanitarian interventions or clinical trials were largely run through national institutions with direct ties to former colonial powers (France intervened in Guinea, the UK in Sierra Leone, and US organisations were the first in Liberia). 4 A comparison of social resistance and engagement in the Ebola response in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea reveals that explanations for the challenges encountered by the response lie in these political configurations, not culture, as was often implied by

Open Access (free)

Mel Bunce

to a wider ‘post-truth’ political landscape in the US – that is, a culture in which empirical evidence plays a vastly reduced role ( McIntyre, 2018 ). In addition, Trump’s attacks on the news media have created additional confusion about which information sources can be trusted ( Mourão et al ., 2018 ), and this allows disinformation and falsehoods to flourish. Disinformation and Humanitarian Crises There have not been any systematic studies of the quantity or reach of disinformation about humanitarian issues. But there are many

Open Access (free)

The Changing Faces of UNRWA

From the Global to the Local

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

principles, this is an approach underpinned by the depoliticisation of the cause of Palestinians’ displacement and dispossession – the occupation of Palestinian territory by the state of Israel. In essence, the deal is a ‘truly Trumpian solution’: ‘cash for peace instead of land for peace… Peace will therefore be economic, rather than political… Their hopes may be dead but their bank accounts will be in the black’ ( Fisk, 2018 ). While UNRWA may be perceived as being at particular risk due to the financial precarity resulting from the funding

Open Access (free)

Emmanuelle Strub

, Rwanda and the entire Great Lakes region of Africa became particularly high-risk areas for aid workers. It was during the intervention in Somalia in 1992 that the interface between security, operational procedures and humanitarian principles became central for MdM. The political and security climate at the time confined NGOs to urban centres across Somalia, while the looting of humanitarian convoys by armed men on the main roads made regular aid delivery to the IDP (internally displaced person) camps difficult. Was armed protection necessary to ensure access to

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From perversion to purity

The stardom of Catherine Deneuve

Edited by: Lisa Downing and Sue Harris

Few screen icons have provoked as much commentary, speculation and adulation as the 'she' of this plaudit, Catherine Deneuve. This book begins with a brief overview of Deneuve's career, followed by a critical survey of the field of theoretical star studies, highlighting its potential and limitations for European, and particularly French, film scholarship. It argues the need for the single-star case study as a model for understanding the multiple signifying elements of transnational stardom. Her first role, at the age of 13, was a brief appearance as a schoolgirl in André Hunebelle's Collégiennes/The Twilight Girls. It was in 1965 that Roman Polanski would cast Catherine Deneuve in Repulsion, described by one critic as a 'one-woman show' in a role that would effectively create a persona which would resonate throughout her future film career. The darker shades of the Deneuve persona are in even greater evidence in Tristana. Demy's Donkey Skin is arguably an equal source of the tale's iconic status in France today, and largely because of Deneuve. The book also investigates films of the 1970s; their role in shaping her star persona and the ways in which they position Deneuve in relation to French political culture. The book considers exactly why directors gravitate towards Deneuve when trying to evoke or represent forms of female homosexual activity on film, and to consider exactly what such directors actually make Deneuve do and mean once they have her performing these particular forms of lesbian relation.

Open Access (free)

Edited by: Jocelyn A. J. Evans

In 2002, the French party system seems to be demonstrating a fluidity, if not outright instability, equal to any period in the Fifth Republic's history. This book explores the extent to which this represents outright change and shifts within a stable structure. Portrayals of French political culture point to incivisme, individualism and a distrust of organizations. The book focuses on three fundamental political issues such as 'politics', 'power' and 'justice', which appear in almost all political discussions and conflicts. It identifies different 'types' of state in political theory and looks at the major challenges to practical state sovereignty in the modern world. Discussing the concept of the nation in the United Kingdom, the book identifies both cultural and political aspects of nationhood. These include nation and state; race and nation; language and the nation; religion and national identity; government and nation; common historical and cultural ties; and a sense of 'nationhood'. Liberal democracy, defensive democracy and citizen democracy/republican democracy are explained. The book also analyses John Stuart Mill's and Isaiah Berlin's views on 'negative' and 'positive' freedom. Conservatism is one of the major intellectual and political strains of thought in Western culture. Liberalism has become the dominant ideology in the third millennium. Socialism sprang from the industrial revolution and the experience of the class that was its product, the working class. Events have made 'fascism' a term of political abuse rather than one of serious ideological analysis. Environmentalism and ecologism constitute one of the most recent ideological movements.

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Niilo Kauppi

1962, the press characterised his visit as the consecration of a European emperor. The chances Europe presented, and still presents for France in terms of politics, economics, and culture, are widely recognised among French elites. To use Delors's terms, Europe presents ‘a unique opportunity' (Delors 1988, 261). However, these new opportunities have not translated into dramatic changes in terms of French political culture and discourse. In this sense, there is a gap between the political significance of Europe in the practices of the French political class and the

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Niilo Kauppi

intellectuals coexist today: the model of the oppositional intellectual and that of the functional intellectual. These models are embedded in different national political cultures and institutional configurations. The intellectual goes either against the stream or with it. The relationship between the two in different countries and public spheres varies, from the dominance of one over the other to a more or less equal relationship. France is a country where intellectual culture is highly developed and where the oppositional intellectual rules. An example will illustrate this

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Politics and pleasure

Inventing popular culture in contemporary France

David Looseley

1 Politics and pleasure: inventing popular culture in contemporary France David Looseley France is an invention, a conceptualisation. (Kuisel 1996: 5–6) T Introduction his first chapter focuses on political conceptualisations of popular culture in France, by which I mean conceptualisations developed by governments, parties, national institutions and the kind of public intellectuals who, as Ahearne (2010: 2) puts it, ‘have moved in and out of positions within public policy processes’. Other chapters in this volume will be concerned with popular