This book presents a biography of the poetics and politics of London in 1613, from Whitehall to Guildhall, that is, Shakespeare's London. It examines major events at court, such as the untimely death of Prince Henry and its aftermath, and the extravagant wedding of Princess Elizabeth to Frederick of Germany and her journey to the Continent. The city flourished with scores of publications on a vast array of topics, including poetry, travel narratives, music, and, of course, plays. The book offers summaries and analyses of most of these texts, knowing that some of them may not be well-known to all readers. Many of these publications had a kind of link to the court. In order to understand the context of the year 1613, the book actually begins in October 1612 with Prince Henry's illness and death in November, which had a major impact on what happened in 1613. It proceeds more or less chronologically from this event to Princess Elizabeth's wedding and the stunning array of dramatic performances at court, and includes the journey to her new home in Germany. As part of the year's cultural nexus, the narrative reaches into the Guildhall experience to explore the riches of the books that emanated from London's printers and to examine specifically the drama performed or published in 1613. The final major focus centres on the Carr-Howard wedding at the year's end, full of cultural activities and ripe with political significance.

‘Left to the mercy of the world’

This book examines the way in which abandonment to the London Foundling Hospital developed, and how it was used as a strategy by parents and parish officials. It also explores how it was mediated into health and survival outcomes for the infants involved. In considering pathways to health, ill-health and death for foundlings, the book engages with developments in childcare, ideas on childhood, motherhood and medicine, and a multitude of debates on charity, welfare, entitlement and patronage. The first half of the book is concerned primarily with the characteristics of the infants at abandonment, and how this affected their survival prospects. It gives significant insights into how abandonment worked as a poverty alleviation strategy in England, the condition of poor infants at birth and what their risk factors in terms of survivorship were. The second half of the book examines the critical nursing period for all foundlings placed with external nurses between 1741 and 1764. Since an infant's risk of death declines over time, this early experience captured much of their most vulnerable time of life. The hospital's records on nursing are enormously rich and detailed, and one of the benefits of this study is that it enables us to compare the foundlings' experiences of nursing, childcare and health with those of non-foundlings.

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The hub of an English river transport network, 1250–1550

11 London: the hub of an English river transport network, 1250–1550 Claire A. Martin The River Thames was at the heart of the transport infrastructure that kept the capital and its population supplied with both necessities and luxuries. It was vital to the life and commerce of the medieval city.1 Its connection to the sea and the trading networks of the continent brought a variety of commodities into and out of London, while the navigable stretches of the Thames, upstream from the city, enabled vital goods such as grain and wood to be conveyed quickly and

in Roadworks
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houses of Hanover and Windsor and their monarchs with direct connections back to Princess Elizabeth and her progeny. The burning of the Globe Theatre in June 1613 caused cultural distress and loss, but even it rose phoenix-like in 1614, to remain a fixture on London’s south bank until the Puritans pulled it down in the 1640s. Its endurance and that of other theatres, including

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
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collaborator John Fletcher. He did not, however, immediately abandon spending time in London. In fact, in March 1613, Shakespeare purchased the Blackfriars gatehouse, the only property that he ever owned in London. In all likelihood, he resided there during parts of 1613, enjoying proximity to the Blackfriars Theatre, which the King’s Men owned, and also easy access across the Thames to the Globe

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
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No court is an island unto itself, nor is a city, even if walled. Rather, each interpenetrates the other. For example, London’s public theatre companies, principally the King’s Men, performed regularly at the Jacobean court, indeed, an impressive number of times in early 1613. In that case, ‘Shakespeare’ remained at court this year. The king’s governing Privy Council

in Shakespeare’s London 1613

pondered its meaning as it lingered over St James’s Palace where lay the critically ill Prince Henry. Earlier on that same day, the streets of London had vibrated with thousands of spectators watching attentively and excitedly the Lord Mayor’s Show that celebrated the inauguration of Sir John Swinnerton, Merchant Taylor, as the new mayor. Not even the lingering chill from yet another storm could dampen the

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
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On a bright, sunny, early summer day in 1613 hundreds of Londoners of various social and economic backgrounds began to make their noisy way to the Globe Theatre on the south bank of the Thames after their midday meal. They came from their shops and homes, walking along the streets of the City of London, through Cheapside and southward toward the medieval London Bridge where they

in Shakespeare’s London 1613

Thomas Middleton, the playwright, honoured Thomas Middleton, Grocer and Lord Mayor, with the magnificent The Triumphs of Truth , a mayoral pageant staged in London’s streets on 29 October 1613. These two could not have anticipated that in a few months they would again be joined in a planned dramatic entertainment, but this time in honour of a court wedding. This

in Shakespeare’s London 1613

Darkness fell early on an October evening in London as a chill gripped the air. In the same month that Prince Henry became fatally ill in 1612, a strange procession of torches slowly moved from the north to Clerkenwell where the Archbishop of Canterbury, George Abbot, and other clergymen and noblemen waited on 8 October. The entourage stopped around 6 p.m. before continuing its

in Shakespeare’s London 1613