Search results

Manchester, 1840–1919

This book provides a distinctive and original contribution to the historiography of sport, adding considerably to our understanding of the origins of soccer within the Manchester region. It is the first academic study of the development of association football in Manchester and is directly linked to the debates within sports history on football’s origins. Its regional focus informs the wider debate, contextualising the growth of the sport in the city and identifying communities that propagated and developed football. The period 1840–1919 saw Manchester’s association game develop from an inconsequential, occasionally outlawed activity, into a major business with a variety of popular football clubs and supporting industries. This study of Manchester football considers the sport’s emergence, development and establishment through to its position as the city’s leading team sport. What establishes a football culture and causes it to evolve is not simply the history of a few clubs, governing bodies, local leagues or promoting schools, but a conglomeration of all of these. The book is innovative in its approach to the origins of footballing in Manchester, where the sport has generally been assumed not to have existed until the creation of what became Manchester City and Manchester United.

From Manchester United as a ‘global leisure brand’ to FC United as a ‘community club’

7 Urban transformation in football: from Manchester United as a ‘global leisure brand’ to FC United as a ‘community club’ George Poulton Introduction Since the 1970s, Manchester’s economy has undergone profound change, with the decline of heavy industry and manufacturing and the rise of the service sector and the leisure industries, as well as the inward investment of new global capital. This is part of a broader structural transformation of urban economies across England, and indeed in many cities globally, where a Keynesian system of interventionist economic

in Realising the city
Abstract only

would suggest that the club’s name should be changed, on approval of the League and the FA, to that of Manchester United. The question was asked would the new club be likely to be re-­admitted to the Second Division under the name of Manchester United? In reply, Mr. West (the secretary) said they would have to apply but did not expect a difficulty. But he did say that as the bulk of supporters were from Newton Heath that he would like to find a way to retain that name.7 James Bown appears to have been the first person to raise question of the club’s name and it seems

in The emergence of footballing cultures
Abstract only

large cities. With United developing as a force in the Second Division and the Manchester FA affiliated directly to the FA, Manchester football appeared to be well organised, structured and progressive. It was perceived as part of Mancunian life, and when the winter of 1904/5 proved particularly harsh, with many locals dying of cold and malnutrition and unemployment high, football contributed to relief efforts. On 23 January City staged a charity game against music hall entertainer George Robey’s ‘Team of Internationals’ at Hyde Road to raise money, and at that game

in The emergence of footballing cultures
Abstract only

function of cities as places of innovation, production, distribution and consumption is clear, and studying city-­regions is important in understanding how cities impact on wider themes, whether political, economic or social.3 The successes of Manchester United and Manchester City have given global exposure to the region and this interest continues to expand in the world’s fastest-­growing economies, with Manchester’s football promoted extensively. While many regions struggle for attention, Greater Manchester is mentioned globally on a frequent basis, and at no direct

in The emergence of footballing cultures

222 The emergence of footballing cultures 10 A strained relationship Mangnall Ernest Mangnall’s time as manager of Manchester United had enabled the club to enjoy its first major successes, but it was to undergo several transformational cycles before it became a major force in the game. Its elevated status would come in the years following the Second World War but, utilising long-­range thinking, Mangnall’s time at United did provide some of the long residuals that aided that club’s later transition, such as the Old Trafford stadium. Recognising the building

in The emergence of footballing cultures
Abstract only
The tension in making and realising a city

ownership and autonomy over their area. Poulton shows how ideas of solidarity and community produced through supporting football clubs was diminished as Manchester United commercialised their operation. Supporting your local football club was a social practice woven into the cultural identity of these communities, whose visceral reaction to the club’s change of management and approach produced feelings of anger and loss. When the aggrieved fans set up FC United as a new club with an explicit focus on community, they resisted attempts to make the club commercial. These

in Realising the city
Refugees at the University of Manchester

successful academic careers in Britain or the United States, some on at least the partial basis of their work in Manchester. It was in his first year in Manchester that Rudolf Peierls, later to join the Manhattan Project, wrote his first published papers in the field of nuclear physics.77 The Fellowships provided the time and space for the displaced to reassess their academic prospects and to seek out more prestigious, more appropriate or more permanent openings. Some did not remain long in Manchester. Peierls himself, one of the first Fellows, left in October 1935 to take

in ‘Jews and other foreigners’

Marrakech Moroccan and Mediterranean Café and Takeaway, which displays an unidentifiable halal logo on its shop front and takeaway menu. We ask the manger if his meat is halal and he replies ‘we are Moroccan, all our meat is certified by the HMC’. Another curry house claims to sell halal but again this is not verifiable. We carry on up Seymour Grove on our way to the local Tesco hyper/​ supermarket on Chester Road, opposite Manchester United’s famous stadium. Much like the Tesco in Cheetham Hill it has a fresh halal meat counter overseen by National Halal and HMC. From

in Religion, regulation, consumption

Manchester today both MBD and MH offer shechita services. In recent decades MBD has become a well-​established kashrut organisation at the local, national and international level. The organisation supervises companies in Europe, the United States, China, India and Japan, amongst other places, and the Manchester Kashrus (MK) stamp and hechsher is visible on 24 25 Koshe r a n d h a la l i n t he U K a nd D e nm ark hundreds of food products at major global companies such as Kellogg’s, Heinz and Kraft. Kellogg’s Trafford Park factory, not far from Manchester United’s

in Religion, regulation, consumption