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Haunted presents

Europeans, Muslim Immigrants and the onus of European–Jewish Histories

Amikam Nachmani

Relations between Europe and its Muslim minorities constitute an extensive focus for discussion both within and beyond the Continent. This book reports on the years mainly between 2005 and 2015 and focuses on the exploitation of recent European history when describing relations and the prospects for the nominally 'Christian' majority and Muslim minority. The discourse often references the Jews of Europe as a guiding precedent. The manifold references to the annals of the Jews during the 1930s, the Second World War and the Holocaust, used by both the Muslim minorities and the European 'white' (sic) majority presents an astonishing and instructive perspective. When researching Europe and its Muslim minorities, one is astonished by the alleged discrimination that the topic produces, in particular the expressions embodied in Islamophobia, Europhobia and anti-Semitism. The book focuses on the exemplary European realities surrounding the 'triangular' interactions and relations between the Europeans, Muslims and Jews. Pork soup, also known as 'identity soup', has been used as a protest in France and Belgium against multicultural life in Europe and against the Muslim migrants who allegedly enjoyed government benefits. If the majority on all sides of the triangle were to unite and marginalize the extreme points of the triangle, not by force but by goodwill, reason and patience, then in time the triangle would slowly but surely resolve itself into a circle. The Jews, Christians, Muslims and non-believers of Europe have before them a challenge.

Open Access (free)

When the Music Stops

Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

Stephen Hopgood

looming environmental disasters. Domestically, the liberal social contract is coming apart in many Western states as the coalition of those who have not benefited from the decades of wealth accumulation after 1979 turns to populist politicians and looks for scapegoats, with experts, immigrants and Muslims seen as prime targets. The commitment to liberal institutions that create limits to the scope of political competition – rights, the rule of law, freedom of the press – and to the basic level of respect due to all persons, be they citizens or refugees

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Conclusion

Brighter European–Muslim–Jewish futures?

Amikam Nachmani

7 Conclusion: brighter European– Muslim–Jewish futures? The encounter between Muslims and the West has never been easy. Crusaders, the Reconquista, the Bosnian massacre in the 1990s are but a few of the painful events in a long history, randomly chosen, that are often referred to and employed towards an agenda. The present encounter is proving even more difficult than previous confrontations between Europe and its Muslim migrants and refugees. The latter are strongly inclined to empathise and identify with their co-religionists who face troubles and problems in

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Hectic times

Europe and its Muslim minorities

Amikam Nachmani

1 Hectic times: Europe and its Muslim minorities Introduction A good quotation should do the job of introducing the reader to a work’s content, its mood and ambiance. Each one of the quotations in the preceding pages could serve as a motto for a book about Europe and its Muslim migrant minorities; several of them directly concern our work on the ‘triangle’, that is to say, the perceptions held by Europeans, Muslims and Jews about each other and the current encounter between Europeans and Muslim migrants. They indicate that European–Jewish precedents have been

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Haunted presents

The Holocaust as a yardstick

Amikam Nachmani

3 Haunted presents: the Holocaust as a yardstick The memory of the Holocaust is intensively used, often as a theoretical and practical yardstick, by both Muslim migrant minorities and the European ‘white’ majority. The fate of European Jewry in World War II is highly discernible in the perceptions and mutual relations between Europe and its Muslim migrants. Muslim migrants’ attitudes towards the Holocaust’s legacy constitute a useful starting point. With necessary caution one can say that, with exceptions, Muslims in Europe are ill-disposed to accept that the

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In the same boat

European opposition, Muslim migrants, impact on Jews

Amikam Nachmani

4 In the same boat: European opposition, Muslim migrants, impact on Jews Pork soup (soupe au cochon), also known as ‘identity soup’, has been used as a protest in France and Belgium against multicultural life in Europe and against the Muslim migrants who allegedly enjoyed government benefits, so much so that very little was left for needy Europeans. Since the winter of 2003 homeless people have been served with hot pork soup made of the ears, tail and legs of the poor animals. Theoretically, the pork menu is a guarantee that Muslims (and Jews) will not frequent

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Orla McGarry

Muslims often find themselves torn between two differing, and often conflicting, cultural and social templates; the norms of Irish society and the religious, cultural and social values of Islam. Daily life frequently necessitates a complex series of balancing acts, findings ways to uphold religious and migrant identities while engaging with, and negotiating inclusion within, mainstream society. 2 Expectations that they conform to the norms of mainstream society, attending school and engaging in other social activities, while simultaneously upholding the cultural

Open Access (free)

Social definitions of halal quality

The case of Maghrebi Muslims in France

Series:

Florence Bergeaud-Blackler

not a material process in strict conformance to an imagined uniquely Islamic prescription; to understand what is halal chap 4 13/8/04 4:21 pm Page 96 96 Qualities of food for meat or food it is necessary to go beyond the abattoir. I suggest in this chapter that the quality ‘halal’ is rather the result of a social and economic consensus between the different generations and cultures of migrant Muslims as distinct from the non-Muslim majority. The production of halal meat seems to adapt to the differing viewpoints of Muslim groups, despite the lack of a clear

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Edited by: Bryan Fanning and Lucy Michael

Immigrants as Outsiders in the Two Irelands examines how a wide range of immigrant groups who settled in the Republic of Ireland and in Northern Ireland from the 1990s are faring today. It asks to what extent might different immigrant communities be understood as outsiders in both jurisdictions.

Immigrants as Outsiders in the Two Irelands brings together research on a wide range of immigrant communities. The book provides a sharp contemporary account of integration that situates migrants’ diverse experiences of exclusion within a detailed overall picture of the range of ways in which they have succeeded socially, economically and politically in building their lives in Ireland and Northern Ireland. Chapters include analyses of the specific experiences of Polish, Filipino, Muslim, African, Roma, refugee and asylum seeker populations and of the experiences of children, as well as analyses of the impacts of education, health, employment, housing, immigration law, asylum policy, the media and the contemporary politics of borders and migration on successful integration.

Immigrants as Outsiders in the Two Irelands offers a unique cross-border perspective on migrants on the island of Ireland today which situates the Irish experience within the wider politics of migration control, Brexit and integration policy. This book is a significant and timely analysis suitable for students of migration at any level in a wide range of social science disciplines.

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‘Are we on the same wavelength?’

Interstitial queerness and the Ismaili diaspora in Ian Iqbal Rashid’s poetry and films

Series:

Alberto Fernández Carbajal

of ethnic objectification and desire that constitute the legacies of colonial social hierarchies. Indeed, in spite of Amin’s British accent, dress, and manner, Sadru implies how his son’s white lovers may be attracted to him because they perceive him as an ethnic ‘Other’. The resolution of Surviving Sabu rehearses an optimistic building of bridges between two generations of migrants that complicate constructions of the ‘good Muslim’ and which acknowledge the multifaceted nature of diasporic film fandom. In one of the film’s last scenes