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Beatrix Futák-Campbell

1 Studying practitioners’ practices Practice theory is a diverse and constantly evolving body of ideas regarding the nature of social action, transcending a variety of disciplines in the social sciences. In this chapter, I trace the evolution of the practice turn, from the seminal work The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory (Schatzki et al., 2001) to a more recent application in the field of IR (Pouliot, 2010; Adler and Pouliot 2011) and EU studies (Adler-Niessen, 2016). In the process, I illustrate the different debates and discussions that have guided the

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David Bolton

This chapter describes the Northern Ireland Centre for Trauma and Transformation (NICTT)’s training development and delivery programmes over ten years, focusing in particular on vocational training. The aim was to build the skills base of existing practitioners by providing a number of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and trauma-related skills courses. The approach taken was

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Alice Marples

Royal College of Physicians of London had been proven false: its attempts to preserve the authority of academic physic by withholding medical information and publicly prosecuting unlicensed practitioners had backfired spectacularly, severely weakening its overall authority within the medical marketplace. 18 They simply could not control the amount of medical information being exchanged, either for cash or credit. The ‘Fraternity’ or College of Physicians established in Dublin in 1667 was equally unable to combat the huge

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Benjamin Hazard

of Flanders in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 2 The persistent occurrence of warfare makes it possible to survey military hospitals and the medical practitioners assigned to them. The provision of adequate medical services was, however, not guaranteed in every theatre of war. Writing on Ireland, Cyril Falls and John McGurk have identified a number of factors that impacted negatively on the availability of military medicine in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Rather than supplying hospitals and providing

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John Cunningham

. This circumstance in turn presented opportunities and hazards to medical practitioners of various kinds. Any effort to study practitioners’ experiences, and the Irish medical environment more generally, amidst the upheaval of the 1640s is inevitably hampered by the scarcity of relevant surviving sources. The latter problem is not unique to that decade; for most of Ireland beyond Dublin, we know little about medical practice in the seventeenth century. Fortunately, there is one extant source that enables a range of relevant

Open Access (free)

The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs is an exciting, new open access journal hosted jointly by The Humanitarian Affairs Team at Save the Children UK, and Centre de Réflexion sur l’Action et les Savoirs Humanitaires MSF (Paris) and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the University of Manchester. It will contribute to current thinking around humanitarian governance, policy and practice with academic rigour and political courage. The journal will challenge contributors and readers to think critically about humanitarian issues that are often approached from reductionist assumptions about what experience and evidence mean. It will cover contemporary, historical, methodological and applied subject matters and will bring together studies, debates and literature reviews. The journal will engage with these through diverse online content, including peer reviewed articles, expert interviews, policy analyses, literature reviews and ‘spotlight’ features.

Our rationale can be summed up as follows: the sector is growing and is facing severe ethical and practical challenges. The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs will provide a space for serious and inter-disciplinary academic and practitioner exchanges on pressing issues of international interest.

The journal aims to be a home and platform for leading thinkers on humanitarian affairs, a place where ideas are floated, controversies are aired and new research is published and scrutinised. Areas in which submissions will be considered include humanitarian financing, migrations and responses, the history of humanitarian aid, failed humanitarian interventions, media representations of humanitarianism, the changing landscape of humanitarianism, the response of states to foreign interventions and critical debates on concepts such as resilience or security.

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More than tropical? Modern housing,expatriate practitioners and the Volta River Project in decolonising Ghana

Modern housing,expatriate practitioners and the Volta River Project in decolonising Ghana

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Viviana d’Auria

their personal histories (they were frequently displaced émigrés) and their professional profiles often involving work in other decolonising territories, these practitioners represented the benevolently internationalist nature of development and legitimised emerging nations’ claims to modernity and its physical manifestations. Frequently summoned by international players such as

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Edited by: John Cunningham

This collection offers important new insights across a broad range of topics relating to medicine in Early Modern Ireland. Of particular note is the substantial attention devoted to the years before 1750, a period that has been relatively neglected in studies of Irish medicine. The book brings together an exciting selection of established scholars, such as Peter Elmer and Clodagh Tait, as well as a number of early career historians. Their work effectively situates Irish medicine in relation to long-term social and cultural change on the island, as well as to appropriate international contexts, encompassing Britain, Europe and the Atlantic World. The chapters also engage in various ways with important aspects of the historiography of medicine in the twenty-first century. Among the key subjects addressed by the contributors are Gaelic medicine, warfare, the impact of new medical ideas, migration, patterns of disease, midwifery and childbirth, book collecting, natural history, and urban medicine. A common thread running through the chapters is the focus on medical practitioners. The book accordingly enables significant new understanding of the character of medical practise in Early Modern Ireland. This collection will be of interest to academics and students of the history of Early Modern medicine. It also contains much that will be essential reading for historians of Ireland.

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The Pathology of Common Life

Domestic Medicine as Gothic Disruption

Anthony Mandal and Keir Waddington

The essay interrogates a range of critically neglected nineteenth-century anthologies, periodicals and yellowbacks to reveal the ways in which ephemeral Gothic narratives contributed revealingly and troublingly to the public understanding of medicine across the nineteenth century and not just during the fin de siècle. By addressing how narratives of everyday medical encounters and interventions were immersed in contemporary anxieties about the nature of medicine and the role of the practitioner, the authors draw attention to how the figure of the practitioner is increasingly problematized until he himself becomes a locus of pathological disturbance, creating a set of images associated with medicine, practitioners and the everyday that proved culturally enduring across nineteenth-century culture.

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How to Write a Horror Film

The Awakening (2011) and Development Practices in the British Film Industry

Alison Peirse

This article reveals how screenwriter Stephen Volk‘s idea for a sequel to The Innocents (1961, Jack Clayton) became, over the course of fifteen years, the British horror film The Awakening (2011, Nick Murphy). It examines practitioner interviews to reflect on creative labour in the British film industry, while also reorientating the analysis of British horror film to the practices of pre-production, specifically development. The research reveals that female protagonist Florence Cathcart was a major problem for the project and demonstrates how the Florence character changed throughout the development process. Repeatedly rewritten and ultimately restrained by successive male personnel, her character reveals persistent, problematic perceptions of gender in British horror filmmaking.