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Écorchés, moulages and anatomical preparations – the cadaver in the teaching of artistic anatomy at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera
Greta Plaitano

Since the sixteenth century, artistic anatomy – a branch of medical science subordinated to the Fine Arts – has understood itself as a comparative investigation halfway between forensic dissection and the analysis of classical art and live bodies. Its teaching was first instituted in Italy by the 1802 curriculum of the national Fine Arts academies, but underwent a drastic transformation at the turn of the century, as the rise of photography brought about both a new aesthetics of vision and an increase in the precision of iconographic documentation. In this article I will attempt to provide a history of the teaching of this discipline at the close of the nineteenth century within the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera in Milan, with a focus on its ties to contemporary French practices. Drawing on archival materials including lesson plans, letters and notes from the classes of the three medical doctors who subsequently held the chair (Gaetano Strambio, Alessandro Lanzillotti-Buonsanti and Carlo Biaggi), I will argue that the deep connections between their teaching of the discipline and their work at the city hospital reveal a hybrid approach, with the modern drive towards live-body study unable to wholly supplant the central role still granted to corpses in the grammar of the visual arts.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Digital Skills Training and the Systematic Exclusion of Refugees in Lebanon
Rabih Shibli
and
Sarah Kouzi

powerful promise of online work to offer an alternative source of income was forced to consider local informal work and insecure entrepreneurship as the primary outcome. A Forced Shift: Moving from Online Work to Local Markets The programme was initially intended to harness the wealth of opportunities provided through WFP’s Innovation Accelerator’s contacts and the wider digital economy. The visit of Carlo Almendral from Silicon Valley to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Accounts of the quatorzain in Italy, France and England in the second half of the sixteenth century
Carlo Alberto Girotto
,
Jean-Charles Monferran
, and
Rémi Vuillemin

given about the sonnet, its history and its reception in each country. We hope this will contribute to uncovering the specificities of the English sonnet and its reception, and that it will allow us better to situate it within European literature as a whole. Theories and practice of the Italian Renaissance sonnet – Carlo Alberto Girotto 6

in The early modern English sonnet
Piero Garofalo
,
Elizabeth Leake
, and
Dana Renga

il gallo canti (Before the Cock Crows, Mario Foglietti, 1993), the representation of Fascist officials comes off as rather benign. For example, in Leto’s film, a few government functionaries are cast in a positively glowing light as in the case of the commissioner Rizzuto who provides Professor Franco Rossini (a character loosely based on Carlo Rosselli) with the possibility of teaching in a gorgeous villa with stunning views of the ocean. The film implies that the good commissioner allows the professor’s wife and daughter to come and live with him. The same might

in Internal exile in Fascist Italy
Piero Garofalo
,
Elizabeth Leake
, and
Dana Renga

, temporary and contingent though they may be. If Pavese drew on his personal experience to tell a story about exile as a state of mind, Carlo Lucarelli’s L’isola dell’angelo caduto reduces the exile element even further, employing internal exile as an environmental expedient, as atmosphere in which to set his thriller. L’isola dell’angelo caduto tells the story of the discovery of a religious cult involved, depending on one’s perspective, in either diabolic or Dionysian sexual rituals. The story is set in 1925 (and thus before the existence of internal exile of the sort

in Internal exile in Fascist Italy
Death and press photography in the anti-capitalist protests in Genoa 2001
Antigoni Memou

numbers of protesters, but from the intense preparations of the Italian government to keep the protesters away from the summit, the violence of some protesters and, more importantly, from the culmination in police violence with the shooting of a young protester by a member of the carabinieri, the Italian military police force. The afternoon of 20 July 2001, when the young protester, Carlo Giuliani, was shot dead, was arguably a turning point for the anti-capitalist movement. Dylan Martinez and Sergei Karpukhin of Reuters, Italo Banchero and Luca Bruno of the Associated

in Photography and social movements
Piero Garofalo
,
Elizabeth Leake
, and
Dana Renga

essentially extraterritorial areas, shadow zones beyond the jurisdiction of national and international laws and to negate complaints by propagating its own idyllic narrative of island paradise. An improbable event, however, brought Lipari and confino to the attention of the world: Carlo Rosselli, Emilio Lussu, and Francesco Fausto Nitti’s audacious escape from the colony, on 27 July 1929.5 Thanks to the fugitives’ stirring accounts of both the oppressive conditions and their intrepid flight, the foreign press dubbed Lipari the ‘Devil’s Island’ or ‘Mussolini’s Siberia’.6

in Internal exile in Fascist Italy
Gerusalemme liberata and the early development of opera in England
Jason Lawrence

what was to become the most widely used and familiar moment for musical adaptation in all of the poem: Armida’s impassioned lament for the departing Rinaldo, after he has been brought to his senses at the sight of his effeminised self in the magic shield carried by Carlo and Ubaldo. 5 It is not only the elevated passions and Dido-like grandeur of the lament itself which suggest the passage

in Tasso’s art and afterlives
Empire and the Italian state’s pursuit of legitimacy, 1871–1945
Giuseppe Finaldi

Introduction In the summer of 1935 Carlo Levi, wealthy liberal-republican and anti-Fascist from Turin, was sent into ‘internal exile’ in a hill-top town in the deep south of Italy. During his relatively benign captivity there he was forced into an unusual encounter for a man of his education and class; deprived of the literate and politically aware with whom he was

in European empires and the people
Abstract only
The Seicento and the return-to-order
Laura Moure Cecchini

, the leading promoters of a new interpretation of the Baroque, and other important scholars of the Baroque such as Longhi did not engage with de Chirico, either. Those who did respond to him, however, represented a wide array of positions and roles: the art historian Lionello Venturi; artists Carlo Carrà and Cipriano Efisio Oppo; writers Curzio Malaparte and Massimo Bontempelli; and art critic and Mussolini's cultural adviser Margherita Sarfatti, among others. 50 Many of them became key cultural figures of the Fascist

in Baroquemania