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Richard Farmer

The CEA and the government 2 The Cinematograph Exhibitors’ Association and the government A lthough the letters MoI are often, and understandably, used as the starting point when examining the relationship between the cinema and the state in Britain during the Second World War, the MoI was not the only government department to have a direct and intrusive influence on British cinemas.1 The Ministries of Labour, Food, Supply and Home Security, as well as the Board of Trade and the Exchequer, were closely involved in the regulation of British cinema exhibition

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
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‘We Want “U” In’
Janet McBain

This short essay draws on research undertaken by the curator of the Scottish Screen Archive on the few surviving films credited to Greens Film Service of Glasgow in the teens and twenties. The research revealed a dynamic family business, born out of the travelling cinematograph shows of the late nineteenth century, growing to assume a dominant role in the Scottish cinema trade in the silent era, across exhibition, distribution and production. One small part of a lost film history waiting for rediscovery – early cinema in Scotland.

Film Studies
Stuart Hanson

move about, enter and disappear, gesticulate, laugh, smoke, eat, drink and perform the most ordinary actions with a fidelity to life that leads one to doubt the evidence of one’s senses. 7 One of the first and most prestigious subjects of the cinematograph (as it was known in Britain) was Queen Victoria, who had been filmed by the Royal Photographer William Downey at Balmoral Castle in

in From silent screen to multi-screen
The cinematicization of French thought and aesthetics (1867–1913)
Christophe Wall-Romana

cinema. 25 Lumen and Matter and Memory , in other words, share a similar epistemic universe in which images are the central actors, and in which a materially disinvested observer faces the totality of the visible in space and time. Some of Bergson’s later texts even refer to what Chaperon calls Flammarion’s ‘celestial cinematograph’ quite explicitly. In Creative Mind , Bergson writes for instance: ‘Suppress the conscious and the living … and you obtain in fact a universe whose successive states are in theory calculable in advance, like the images placed side by

in 1913: The year of French modernism
Stuart Hanson

in the film industry and in doing so it continued a pattern established with the Cinematograph Act 1909. The Cinematograph Films Act 1927 had set a precedent in stressing the importance of making sure that audiences saw a proportion of British films. According to an official from the Foreign Office, speaking in 1938, ‘HM Government have never considered the position and influence of the United Kingdom film industry as

in From silent screen to multi-screen
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Fin-de-siècle gothic and early cinema
Paul Foster

In Francis Ford Coppola’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula ( 1992 ), Dracula visits the Cinematograph in London, which is made plausible by setting the scene in the year of the novel’s publication, 1897. Coppola forcefully reminds the audience that Dracula and film are contemporaneous. This chapter explores the significance of this fact, albeit with

in Monstrous media/spectral subjects
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Brian McFarlane

Bernard Knowles 3 Like Crabtree, Knowles had a long career as a cinematographer before making his debut as director in 1945, a year after Crabtree but at the same studio. His record as a cinematographer began in 1927 and he had racked up forty-three credits in this role in the ensuing seventeen years, emerging as a major practitioner with a record of making directors’ work visually interesting and lighting stars – ‘the money’ – in such ways as to make them look their glowing best. He had a run of popular films as director in the late 1940s, but, arguably, his

in Four from the forties
Stuart Hanson

Twelve ‘atmospherics’ were built but their substantial building costs meant that they were a short-lived development. In 1930 the New Victoria Cinema (now the Apollo Victoria Theatre) was opened in London’s Wilton Road by Provincial Cinematograph Theatres Ltd, one of several carrying the ‘New Victoria’ name across the country. Its significance lies in its design, by E. Wamsley Lewis with W. E. Trent: the exterior, with its

in From silent screen to multi-screen
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Brian McFarlane

Arthur Crabtree 2 When Crabtree began his directing career in 1944, he came with an established reputation as a cinematographer which often endeared him to actors more than did his directorial skills. Again, though, I suspect these have been undervalued, as closer examination of his features will suggest. As was the case with Arliss, the success of these films tended to be attributed to the studio – Gainsborough, again – rather than to the director. Lighting his way through the 1930s (and early 1940s) Crabtree entered the film industry in his late twenties as

in Four from the forties
Deborah Shaw

illustrates this is a wedding of an old conquest of Tomás. Here there is the only example of a long take, in the form of a tracking shot, a technique Cuarón and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki would develop in Y tu mamá también and Children of Men, as will be seen (chapters 8 and 9). The long take reveals children playing and running accompanied by the Mozart soundtrack; there is then a cut to Tomás having sex with the bride in her wedding dress, and one of the boys shoots his water pistol at them in a phallic gag. Mozart’s score and the quality of the cinematography

in The three amigos