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Carmen M. Mangion

6 Building corporate identity The evangelical revival of the late eighteenth century made religion the central focus of middle-class culture and located the family unit at the centre of religious faith and morality.1 The family discourse that evolved from this revival in the next century incorporated many related themes: the centrality of the home, the primacy of a domestic ideology and the gendered nature of the public and private spheres.2 These themes were the focus of a domestic literature which set out to propagate the civilising effects of family life

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Contested identities

Catholic women religious in nineteenth-century England and Wales

Carmen M. Mangion

Roman Catholic women's congregations are an enigma of nineteenth century social history. Over 10,000 women, establishing and managing significant Catholic educational, health care and social welfare institutions in England and Wales, have virtually disappeared from history. In nineteenth-century England, representations of women religious were ambiguous and contested from both within and without the convent. This book places women religious in the centre of nineteenth-century social history and reveals how religious activism shaped the identity of Catholic women religious. It is devoted to evolution of religious life and the early monastic life of the women. Catholic women were not pushed into becoming women religious. On the basis of their available options, they chose a path that best suited their personal, spiritual, economic and vocational needs. The postulancy and novitiate period formed a rite of passage that tested the vocation of each aspirant. The book explores the religious activism of women religious through their missionary identity and professional identity. The labour of these women was linked to their role as evangelisers. The book deals with the development of a congregation's corporate identity which brought together a disparate group of women under the banner of religious life. It looks specifically at class and ethnicity and the women who entered religious life, and identifies the source of authority for the congregation and the individual sister.

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Post-Humanitarianism

Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

Mark Duffield

). Moreover, unlike autonomous direct action, which reached its peak in the late 1980s, humanitarian innovation sits comfortably with private partners and corporate sponsorship ( Zyck and Kent, 2014 ), a necessary recalibration given its dependence upon what can be called the computational turn – that is, since the 1990s, the seamless penetration of commercial information and communication technologies, software platforms, automating apps and screen interfaces into all aspects of personal, social, national and international life tout court

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The social world of early modern Westminster

Abbey, court and community 1525–1640

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J. F. Merritt

Early modern Westminster is familiar as the location of the Royal Court at Whitehall, parliament, the law courts and the emerging West End, yet it has never been studied in its own right. This book reveals the often problematic relations between the diverse groups of people who constituted local society - the Court, the aristocracy, the Abbey, the middling sort and the poor - and the competing visions of Westminster's identity which their presence engendered. There were four parishes in Westminster at the turn of the sixteenth century. The parishes of St Martin's and St Margaret's have been identified as two of only eighteen English parishes for which continuous and detailed parish records survive for the turbulent period 1535-1570. Differences in social organization, administrative structure and corporate life in the two parishes also provide a study in contrasts. These crucial differences partly shaped forms of lay piety in each parish as well as their very different responses to the religious reformations of Henry VIII and his children. The death of Henry VIII heralded important changes in Westminster. Most strikingly, however, this was a period of major religious change, in stark contrast to the piecemeal changes of Henry's reign. The dissolution of Westminster's abbey gave rise to special problems. The book examines individuals who wielded the most influence at the local government; as well as the social identity of these parish elites. Finally, it explores the interaction of religion with the social and political developments observed in the post-Reformation town.

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Telling tales

Work, narrative and identity in a market age

Angela Lait

The global financial crisis of the early twenty-first century focused attention on the processes that sustain the excesses of corporate capitalism. This book gives an account of the role played by literature in human subjectivity and identity under the working conditions of late-capitalism as these affect the well-being of specialist, middle-class and public sector professionals. It explores how the organisation struggles to reconcile the flexibility and responsiveness characteristic of modern business with the unity and stability needed for a coherent image. Next, an examination of business survivor manuals addressing the needs of employees failing to cope with time-pressure and the required transformation into perfect new economy workers discovers their use of appealing narrative principles. The book covers the theoretical foundations on which assumptions about the subjectivity and identity of the professional middle class have been made, including the ideological pressures and contradictions. It also investigates satisfying work more fully through analysis of popular practical instruction books on cookery and horticulture. The book considers how organic activities involving slow time, such as horticulture, cookery and the craft of writing about them, give a strong cultural message concerning the current organisation of time, work satisfaction and relationships. In particular, it deals with how the human feels attuned to balance, continuity and interconnectedness through the cyclical patterns and regulated rhythms of slower evolutionary change evident in natural systems. The nature of the autobiographic text is also considered in the book.

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Angela Lait

examined (below), the development is in the opposite direction towards an increasingly hardened discourse of efficiency and uncompromising management practice copied from the boardroom robustness of the private sector. Corporate business and the public sector The signalling of a cultural shift towards the performance-driven, cost-effective market dynamism of corporate business has implications for the character and identity of public sector workforces and marks the end of public sector employment as a positive choice made to avoid the worst excesses of corporate

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Helena Chance

River Park, made for NCR employees between 1906 and 1939, are highly significant to the history of corporate landscapes in terms of their scale and the sophistication of their designs in a factory context.1 In this chapter I compare these parks to reveal diversities in the cultural, symbolic and stylistic approaches to landscape design in the two nations, including what it was possible to achieve in the suburban landscapes of Britain and the USA and in the beliefs, desires and expectations of the factory worker and his patriarch in what the landscape could provide for

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Carmen M. Mangion

linked to their role as evangelis-ers. Another related factor was their professional identity as educators and health care professionals; this is discussed in Chapter 5. The final part, ‘Corporate identities’, begins in Chapter 6 with the development of a congregation’s corporate identity which brought together a disparate group of women under the banner of religious life. Chapter 7 looks specifically at class and ethnicity and the women who entered religious life. The entry of a diverse group of women into simple-vowed congregations had many implications for the

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Jonathan Hearn

‘victims’, however much the people in this study seemed to be at the mercy of forces beyond their control. If, as argued in Chapter 5, constant change is part of the general ideology of modern corporate life, then we are confronted with a relatively constant ‘salvage situation’, a chronic instability of institutional orders and their associated cultures and identities. Nonetheless, there is a basic issue of studying something that was changing particularly rapidly at that time, and in some sense disappearing. This was clearly part of how my informants understood the

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Comparison

Doing ethnography and thinking comparatively

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Jonathan Hearn

7 Comparison: doing ethnography and thinking comparatively The concept of comparison that shapes this chapter functions somewhat differently from the concepts organising the previous three chapters (culture, change and identity). Those served as analytic lenses to bring out particular dimensions of the data. Comparison here is primarily a matter of relating the ethnographic data to other experiences which lie beyond that research. I am using comparison to draw out further themes from the data, and to revisit some we have already explored, but also to pull back