Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 70 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

, editing stage. It makes sense to start by using your word-processing package’s spelling and grammar checker, but you will probably have discovered by now that it is not foolproof – so be sure never to rely on it without additional checks. In any case, unless you have carefully amended its dictionary, it can be completely useless for the names of authors and some sociological terminology. More to the point, spelling checkers cannot pick up some common spelling mistakes, particularly homophones – words that sound the same but have different spellings and meanings such as

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Author: Rachael Gilmour

At a time when monolingualist claims for the importance of ‘speaking English’ to the national order continue louder than ever, even as language diversity is increasingly part of contemporary British life, literature becomes a space to consider the terms of linguistic belonging. Bad English examines writers including Tom Leonard, James Kelman, Suhayl Saadi, Raman Mundair, Daljit Nagra, Xiaolu Guo, Leila Aboulela, Brian Chikwava, and Caroline Bergvall, who engage multilingually, experimentally, playfully, and ambivalently with English’s power. Considering their invented vernaculars and mixed idioms, their dramatised scenes of languaging – languages learned or lost, acts of translation, scenes of speaking, the exposure and racialised visibility of accent – it argues for a growing field of contemporary literature in Britain pre-eminently concerned with language’s power dynamics, its aesthetic potentialities, and its prosthetic strangeness. Drawing on insights from applied linguistics and translation studies as well as literary scholarship, Bad English explores contemporary arguments about language in Britain – in debates about citizenship or education, in the media or on Twitter, in Home Office policy and asylum legislation – as well as the ways they are taken up in literature. It uncovers both an antagonistic and a productive interplay between language politics and literary form, tracing writers’ articulation of linguistic alienation and ambivalence, as well as the productivity and making-new of radical language practices. Doing so, it refutes the view that language difference and language politics are somehow irrelevant to contemporary Britain and instead argues for their constitutive centrality to the work of novelists and poets whose inside/outside relationship to English in its institutionalised forms is the generative force of their writing.

Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

individual. Most of us, even if we are very good at spelling, have some words which continue to trip us up. For many people, these are words that have letters in somewhat unexpected places, or in which the sound of the word does not quite match the spelling, such as accessible , accommodate , exercise , necessary , paralleled and privilege . Many of us too have to work hard at distinguishing between advice , which is a noun, and advise , the verb, or rather more taxing, the noun practice and the verb practise , 2 which are homophones (sound the same

in The craft of writing in sociology
Open Access (free)
Beowulf translations by Seamus Heaney and Thomas Meyer
David Hadbawnik

source and target texts. 63 In practice, Meyer often responds to the Old English with a different sort of intimacy than Heaney. This intimacy is comparable to the ‘perverse’ obsession with the sound of Homer's Greek that drives poet David Melnick's ‘homophonic’ translation of the Iliad , a project that, like Meyer's, was undertaken under the influence of modern and postmodern poets during the 1970s

in Dating Beowulf
Nicholas Royle

Four words to end – forwards, for the mighty force of Cixous! All the homophones herded together, heard together, alone and otherwise. Oh all to wend. Four words for her work, for reading her now, off to the side and all wards, for years to come. Four falling or flying words for the love of her writing, for her love for writing. ‘Four’ that can sound a forewarning, as in the dangerously wayward striking of a golf ball: Fore! ‘Four’ that might also meow or snuffle, in French: fors (with a silent ‘s’). ‘Fors

in Hélène Cixous
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

‘the dodgem cars at the fair’. Others, homographs, are spelled the same way but pronounced differently, as well as meaning something else: ‘lead’, ‘bow’, ‘perfect’. Homophones sound the same but are written differently and have quite different meanings: ‘right, rite, write’, ‘meet, meat’ and ‘aloud and allowed’. It is particularly important for writers to know about homophones, not least to be sure their grammar is correct. One of the commonest mistakes with homophones concerns the three words ‘there’, ‘their’ and ‘they’re’. Writing ‘their were three books published

in The craft of writing in sociology
Barbery, earwax and snip-snaps
Eleanor Decamp

commenting on Morose’s physical complexion as well as his demeanour. The adjective is especially linked to grease and oil. Morose’s ear canal is the subject of the Boy’s attention, which is particularly foregrounded by the phonic similarity between ‘ease’ (in the text) and ‘ears’ (implied in the context). The homophone for the phrase is ‘greasy in his ears’. In George Peele’s Old Wives’ Tale, Huanebango is, according to stage directions, ‘deafe and cannot heare’.28 Zantippa cannot get his attention other than by breaking a pitcher over his head and exclaims, ‘Foe, what

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Abstract only
On sitting down to read a letter from Freud
Nicholas Royle

irrepressible homophone that English gives: Probably knot . Everything about psychoanalysis seems to insist on memory and the past, but really it is about the future. Apropos Freud’s celebrated remark that every dream has a navel, a ‘spot where it reaches down into the unknown’, 13 Derrida declares: ‘What forever exceeds the analysis of the dream is indeed a knot that cannot be untied.’ 14 Probably knot : I hear it, washing back once again into the muttering, squabbling, mewing, passionate strains of the cries of seagulls. Seaford, East Sussex Good Friday 2017

in Hélène Cixous
Abstract only
On the misuse of Beowulf in Andreas
Richard North

hlynsode. ( Beowulf , lines 765–70) (For all the Danes, for fortress-dwellers, for each keen man, for noblemen, there happened a prescription of good fortune. Both were wrathful, fierce the house-janitors. The building boomed.) Both ‘meoduscerwen’ and ‘ealuscwerwen’ are governed by ‘wearð’, the preterite of ‘weorðan’ (‘become, happen’). Elsewhere I have followed a theory (of Ursula Dronke; personal commuication) that the ealu- prefix to the Beowulf compound denotes ‘good fortune’ rather than ‘ale’, its homophone; that ‘ealu’, connoting ‘prosperity

in Aspects of knowledge