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Open Access (free)

Andrea M. Szkil

The subject of forensic specialist‘s work with human remains in the aftermath of conflict has remained largely unexplored within the existing literature. Drawing upon anthropological fieldwork conducted from 2009–10 in three mortuary facilities overseen by the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), this article analyses observations of and interviews with ICMP forensic specialists as a means of gaining insight into their experiences with the remains of people who went missing during the 1992–95 war in BiH. The article specifically focuses on how forensic specialists construct and maintain their professional identities within an emotionally charged situation. Through analysing forensic specialists encounters with human remains, it is argued that maintaining a professional identity requires ICMP forensic specialists to navigate between emotional attachment and engagement according to each situation.

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Contested identities

Catholic women religious in nineteenth-century England and Wales

Carmen M. Mangion

Roman Catholic women's congregations are an enigma of nineteenth century social history. Over 10,000 women, establishing and managing significant Catholic educational, health care and social welfare institutions in England and Wales, have virtually disappeared from history. In nineteenth-century England, representations of women religious were ambiguous and contested from both within and without the convent. This book places women religious in the centre of nineteenth-century social history and reveals how religious activism shaped the identity of Catholic women religious. It is devoted to evolution of religious life and the early monastic life of the women. Catholic women were not pushed into becoming women religious. On the basis of their available options, they chose a path that best suited their personal, spiritual, economic and vocational needs. The postulancy and novitiate period formed a rite of passage that tested the vocation of each aspirant. The book explores the religious activism of women religious through their missionary identity and professional identity. The labour of these women was linked to their role as evangelisers. The book deals with the development of a congregation's corporate identity which brought together a disparate group of women under the banner of religious life. It looks specifically at class and ethnicity and the women who entered religious life, and identifies the source of authority for the congregation and the individual sister.

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Carmen M. Mangion

5 Professionalising1 It is not praising a nun to say that she is a good teacher or a good cook (though these qualities are valuable acquisitions to their Community), but the praise of a nun is to say ‘She is a good religious’.2 The labour of women religious in the fields of education and health care and in the provision of social services was intricately linked to their missionary and professional identity. As discussed in the previous chapter, salvation – their own and that of others – was at the core of their way of life as simplevowed women religious. Their

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Mediterranean Quarantines, 1750–1914

Space, identity and power

Edited by: John Chircop and Francisco Javier Martínez

This volume aims to disclose the political, social and cultural factors that influenced the sanitary measures against epidemics developed in the Mediterranean during the long nineteenth century. The contributions to the book provide new interdisciplinary insights to the booming field of ‘quarantine studies’ through a systematic use of the analytic categories of space, identity and power. The ultimate goal is to show the multidimensional nature of quarantine, the intimate links that sanitary administrations and institutions had with the territorial organization of states, international trade, the construction of national, colonial, religious and professional identities or the configuration of political regimes. The circum-Mediterranean geographical spread of the case studies contained in this volume illuminates the similarities and differences around and across this sea, on the southern and northern shores, in Arabic, Spanish, Portuguese, Greek, Italian, English and French-speaking domains. At the same time, it is highly interested in engaging in the global English-speaking community, offering a wide range of terms, sources, bibliography, interpretative tools and views produced and elaborated in various Mediterranean countries. The historical approach will be useful to recognize the secular tensions that still lie behind present-day issues such as the return of epidemics or the global flows of migrants and refugees.

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Identity

Struggles with personhood, nationhood and professional virtue

Series:

Jonathan Hearn

6 Identity: struggles with personhood, nationhood and professional virtue The multi-study research project of which this ethnographic study is a part was originally conceived in the context of then recent devolution in Scotland and constitutional change in the UK more generally. We were trying to get a finer-grained understanding of how national identity works on a banal, everyday basis (Billig 1995) and how it connects to personhood and individual identity (Cohen 1996). Thus we chose to explore Scottish national identity within the mundane frame of a large

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Angela Lait

08c-Telling Tales-198-215 23/5/12 10:40 Page 198 Conclusion The meaning and value of self-mastery Heaven or hell on earth? This study has given an account of the role played by literature (in its broadest sense) in human subjectivity and identity under the working conditions of late-capitalism as these affect the well-being of specialist, middle-class, public sector professionals. The argument claims that application of private business values to public service, backed by an increasing volume of organisational messaging, results in a number of performative

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Angela Lait

03c-Telling Tales-048-079 23/5/12 10:34 Page 48 2 Identity Sink or swim: the dilemma of the failing middle-class professional Introduction This chapter contextualises the work-based identity insecurity experienced by middle-class professionals in the public sector among the general identity-making problems of postmodernity and other cultural determinants of the group. The aim is to illuminate how the call to adapt quickly and constantly to the changing demands of the profit-hungry and cost-effective market impacts on this class with particular intensity. It

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Series:

Louise A. Jackson

stations, carrying out similar duties to male officers and working solely with them. It is important, therefore, to uncover the diversity of women’s policing work and to offer a comparative perspective across time and space. This book examines the professional roles, identities, activities and experiences of women police in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK) from a historical perspective, using a range of oral testimonies, documentary and visual sources. In so doing, it also aims to comment more broadly on the gendering of modern surveillance

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Policing boundaries

Quarantine and professional identity in mid nineteenth-century Britain

Lisa Rosner

5 Policing boundaries: quarantine and professional identity in mid nineteenth-century Britain Lisa Rosner Introduction As the British imperial presence spread across the world’s inland seas and oceans from the late eighteenth through the nineteenth centuries, so too did deadly diseases like yellow fever, cholera and dysentery. Management of these diseases invariably created disputes between medical men in Royal Navy ships and those at the ports they visited, over whether specific diseases were communicable and, thus, whether there was any purpose to quarantine

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Emma Liggins

man’s daughter to ‘issue from the shadow of the private house’ onto ‘the bridge which lies between the old world and the new’.1 No longer home-bound and repressed like the passive home daughters of the 1910s and 1920s, spinster heroines in Winifred Holtby’s Poor Caroline and South Riding and Virginia Woolf ’s late and often ignored novel The Years are professionalised and to a certain extent politically active. The privileging of professional over sexual identities, however, sits uneasily with feminist discussions of sexuality, such as Holtby’s exposure in Women and