Abstract only

Punk zines

‘Symbols of defiance’ from the print to the digital age

Matt Grimes and Tim Wall

15 Punk zines: ‘symbols of defiance’ from the print to the digital age Matt Grimes and Tim Wall In this chapter we examine the development of punk fanzines from the late 1970s to the present, exploring the role of these music fan-produced publications in giving meaning to the experience of a music community. This discussion of the punk fanzine’s longitudinal existence allows us to investigate the variety of ways that the fanzines and webzines make sense of punk as music, a set of political ideas and as a subcultural scene. In particular we want to trace the way

Abstract only

Explaining punk

A review of existing accounts

Series:

Nick Crossley

3 Explaining punk: a review of existing accounts In this chapter I review a number of theories of punk’s emergence, preparing the way for my own account in Chapter 4. All of the theories discussed shed some light upon punk’s origins but I will argue that, even in combination, they do not suffice. My purpose in discussing them is twofold. On the one hand I want to take what is useful from them. On the other, critiquing them affords me an opportunity to sketch out ideas that I will build upon in later chapters. The focus of the chapter is exclusively upon punk

Abstract only

Immigrant punk

The struggle for post-modern authenticity

Ivan Gololobov

4 Immigrant punk: the struggle for post-modern authenticity Ivan Gololobov I know, I’m stranger in your land I know, ladies and gentlemen I know, I am coming here to stay And take your jobs away.1 Punk is often regarded as a subculture essentially based on the principles of authenticity.2 In most general terms, following Taylor, authenticity is understood as an ability to break external impositions and to express one’s own Self.3 The reverse of this term is coined by Adorno who regards inauthenticity as a situation where ‘something broken is implied’; he

Abstract only

From punk to post-punk

A tale of three cities

Series:

Nick Crossley

8 From punk to post-punk: a tale of three cities Following the moral panic described in Chapter 7 punk became part of Britain’s national consciousness. Everybody knew about it and every city had its own local punk world. Over time, however, the diffusion of punk gave way to opposition and adaptation, in Tarde’s (2000) sense (Crossley 2014). Significant numbers of those who had been mobilised by the energy and DIY ethos of punk began to feel that it was ossifying; becoming uniform, limited and limiting. They wanted to do something different. Les Pattinson of

Abstract only

Punk goes national

Broadcast networks, media and moral panics

Series:

Nick Crossley

7 Punk goes national: broadcast networks, media and moral panics For the first half of 1976 the UK’s punk world, as described in Chapter 6, was a network of interactivity involving no more than 100 people and a handful of focal places in central London. By the beginning of 1977, by contrast, every major city and certain larger towns had their own local punk worlds, and these local worlds were connected, forming a national punk world. I discuss three of these new worlds in Chapters 8 and 9 and I discuss the shape and characteristics of the national network in

Abstract only

Punks against censorship

Negotiating acceptable politics in the Dutch fanzine Raket

Kirsty Lohman

16 Punks against censorship: negotiating acceptable politics in the Dutch fanzine Raket Kirsty Lohman Punk took root in The Netherlands in 1977, with scores of new bands forming through 1978–80.1 As elsewhere, punk’s mix of spectacular imagery, nihilism and/or radical politics, shock value and a do-it-yourself approach appealed to young people. Also in the late 1970s, the port city of Rotterdam was undergoing a process of deindustrialisation and automation. It was still being rebuilt, both literally and figuratively, following near-annihilation during the Second

Abstract only

Punking the bibliography

RE/Search Publications, the bookshelf question and ideational flow

S. Alexander Reed

15 Punking the bibliography: RE/Search Publications, the bookshelf question and ideational flow S. Alexander Reed Since 1980, San Francisco-based RE/Search has published zines, compendia and significant texts of western subculture. These publications contain hundreds of interviews with underground artists, intellectuals, collectors and scenesters, and throughout RE/Search’s history, editor V. Vale (Vale Hamanaka) and former editor Andrea Juno have repeatedly asked these subjects some version of the ‘bookshelf question’: What do you read? When reading lists

Abstract only

Playing a-minor in the punk scene?

Exploring the articulation of identity by older women punks

Laura Way

3 Playing a-minor in the punk scene? Exploring the articulation of identity by older women punks Laura Way Punk has retained its presence in the subcultural literature that has flourished since the Birmingham University Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) was established in the 1960s. But while theoretical shifts away from the assumed link between youth and subcultural participation have drawn attention to ageing within a subculture, there continues to be a notable absence of women in such analysis. To help rectify this, I intend here to utilise

Abstract only

Afterword – the cultural impact of punk

An interview with Jon Savage

Matthew Worley

Afterword The cultural impact of punk: an interview with Jon Savage Matthew Worley Among the numerous accounts of punk’s origins and early development that now exist, Jon Savage’s England’s Dreaming (1991) is peerless. Combining sharp critical analysis with participatory insight, it locates British punk squarely within its socio-economic, cultural and political context. Indeed, Savage’s reading of punk may be traced back to his 1976-produced fanzine London’s Outrage, which interspersed media clippings and pop cultural references with an essay forewarning Britain

Abstract only

Tom Vague

10 Vague post-punk memoirs, 1979–89 Tom Vague Vague covers a boring Salisbury–Bournemouth sort of area with enthusiasm. Kris Needs, Zigzag (1980) At the end of the 1970s, as punk rock became post-punk and Margaret Thatcher came to power, Vague fanzine was founded at Salisbury College of Technology and Art (now Wiltshire College) by Perry Harris, Iggy Zevenbergen and me. Perry’s ‘Vague beginnings’ cartoon illustrates the idea’s conception with us saying: ‘Salisbury’s boring. There’s nothing to do … Let’s start a fanzine … What shall we call it? … Let’s base it