Search results

Abstract only
The moron as a poorly functioning human
Gerald V. O’Brien

. 92. 99 Ibid. 100 Weir noted that even up to the beginning of World War II ‘there were “incubator baby sideshows”, displaying premature and deformed infants for the curious public who paid to see the shows’. R.F. Weir, Selective Nontreatment of Handicapped Newborns (New York: Oxford University Press, 1984), p. 21. Also popular, and of even more recent vintage, were ‘pickled punks’, which were deformed fetuses that had been preserved in jars and displayed as a curiosity. See R. West, Pickled Punks and Girlie Shows: A Life Spent on the Midways of America (Atglen

in Framing the moron
Abstract only
Katherine Fennelly

relationships between members of punk culture in London in the 1970s ( 2011 ). Similarly, Katherine Giles and Melanie Giles’s study of twentieth-century graffiti in rural farmhouses in the Yorkshire Wolds looked at graffiti as the material, as well as textual, indicator of routines and accounts of life experiences ( 2010 ). In the context of an historical institution, Eleanor Casella’s examination of prisoner graffiti in Ireland relating to penal transportation emphasises the act of the inmate in creating graffiti. Casella paints a vivid picture of graffiti ‘painstakingly

in An archaeology of lunacy
Emily Cock

.g. Dolan, ‘Taking the Pencil out of God's Hand’; Karim-Cooper, Cosmetics in Shakespearean and Renaissance Drama ; Snook, Women, Beauty and Power . 149 Vickers, ‘Diana Described’. 150 Hobby, ‘The Politics of Gender’, p. 40. 151 Paré, Workes , Qqq4 r . 152 Dunton, Bumography , sig. C4 v . 153 Politick Whore , sig. H1 v ; Williams, Dictionary , pp 326–327. ‘Crack’ is also an updating of the term ‘punk’ in Davenport's original: Davenport, City-Night-Cap , sig. E4r. 154 Ward, London Terræ-filius , sig. D2 r ; original emphasis. 155 Varholy, ‘Rich like a

in Rhinoplasty and the nose in early modern British medicine and culture