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British military personnel’s memories and accounts of service in Northern Ireland
K. Neil Jenkings and Rachel Woodward

Serving in troubled times 7 Serving in troubled times: British military personnel’s memories and accounts of service in Northern Ireland K. Neil Jenkings and Rachel Woodward What are the legacies and memories of the Troubles for those 300,000 military personnel, many serving multiple tours of duty, who were deployed in Northern Ireland with the British Armed Forces? It is possibly too early to say this definitively; archives of personal letters and accounts are often only created on the emergence of artefacts (correspondence, diaries and medical records etc

in The Northern Ireland Troubles in Britain
The case of International Financial Services, London
Craig Berry

04c Globalisation 099-119 2/2/11 15:10 Page 99 4 Serving the ‘offshore’: the case of International Financial Services, London International Financial Services, London is a not-for-profit lobbyist organisation for City-based financial services providers (known as British Invisibles until 2000). Its membership is drawn from the largest private sector organisations operating in the City of London, but includes also the Bank of England and the City of London Corporation. The organisation was in fact first established in 1968 by the Bank of England as the

in Globalisation and ideology in Britain
The Cypriot Mule corps, imperial loyalty and silenced memory

Most Cypriots and British today do not know that Cypriots even served in the Great War. This book contributes to the growing literature on the role of the British non-settler empire in the Great War by exploring the service of the Cypriot Mule Corps on the Salonica Front, and after the war in Constantinople. This book speaks to a number of interlocking historiographies, contributing to various debates especially around enlistment/volunteerism, imperial loyalty and veterans' issues. At the most basic level, it reconstructs the story of Cypriot Mule Corps' contribution, of transporting wounded men and supplies to the front, across steep mountains, with dangerous ravines and in extreme climates. The book argues that Cypriot mules and mule drivers played a pivotal role in British logistics in Salonica and Constantinople, especially the former. It explores the impact of the war on Cypriot socio-economic conditions, particularly of so many men serving abroad on the local economy and society. The issues that arose for the British in relation to the contracts they offered the Cypriots, contracts offered to the muleteers, and problems of implementing the promise of an allotment scheme are also discussed. Behavioural problems one finds with military corps, such as desertion and crime, were not prevalent in the Cypriot Mule Corps. The book also explores the impact of death and incapacity on veterans and dependants, looking at issues that veterans faced after returning and resettling into Cypriot life.

Queering the Gothic Parody of Arsenic and Old Lace
Jason Haslam

Frank Capras Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), based on Joseph Kesselrings popular Broadway play, has been largely ignored by critics and Capra-philes. The film is generally perceived of as existing outside of the corpus of Capras other films, such as Its a Wonderful Life, Mr Deeds Goes to Town, and Mr Smith Goes to Washington. As Thomas Schatz states, the feeling about Arsenic is that it is little more than a serving of canned theater, an entertaining and straightforward recreation,of the stage play with virtually none of the style or substance of earlier Capra-directed pictures. Victor Scherle and William Turner Levy note that ‘Capra left the play essentially unchanged and did not embellish it with any special social significance’. In his extensive biography of the director, Joseph McBride goes so far as to state that the filming of Arsenic signals the beginning of a ‘flight from ideas’ which would continue for most of Capras career.

Gothic Studies
Margaret C. Flinn

This article traces what Élie Faure believed to be the racial, ethnic and geographic origins of art. Influenced by the writings of Gobineau and Taine, he asserts that the taxonomisation of species provides a model for the taxonomisation of artistic productions. The mixing of various races is evidenced in their artistic production, with the relative presence or absence of the rhythmic serving as an index for the presence or absence of certain types of blood, or racial/ethnic origins. Similarly, the qualities of the land where art is produced results in visible effects upon the (artistic) forms created by the people living in that geographic area. Métissage is considered a positive characteristic, and cinema the apogee of modern artistic production because of its integration of machine rhythms into the rhythms of human gesture.

Film Studies
Racial Discourse in Mary Shelley‘s Frankenstein
Allan Lloyd Smith

This article examines the effects of early anthropological accounts of other races in producing tropes for monstrosity in the Gothic, such as we see in Frankenstein where the monster, although not of any known race since he is hybridly created from parts of dead bodies, shares features with popular accounts of the racially other, echoes Haitian slave rebellion violence in his responses to ill treatment, and achieves his literacy and independence in the manner of popular slave narratives. Gothic tropes were sometimes employed in anti-slavery narratives such as Uncle Tom‘s Cabin, and many of the descriptions of brutality and terror in realist slave narratives are properly to be considered Gothic (and may in fact borrow from gothic fictional techniques). Slavery itself could be argued to outdo the Gothic in its actuality, as well as serving as a source for gothic fantasy. This provokes a rethinking of the now conventional assumption that Frankenstein‘s acknowledgement of responsibility for his creature implies that it does his unconscious bidding; on the contrary, Frankenstein admits his responsibility as a slaveholder might for the actions of his slave, but without in any way endorsing them.

Gothic Studies
Irene O‘Daly

This article investigates a series of additions made to JRL Gaster MS 2037, a newly identified copy of Peter of Poitier‘s Compendium historiae in genealogia Christi. Following a detailed description and dating of the manuscript, it investigates two sets of additions to the roll in depth. It establishes that the first motive behind the inclusion of such additions was educative – serving to extend the historic information given in the Compendium, while the second motive was devotional – elevating the status of the Virgin Mary through the enhancement of her genealogical record. Given the fact that the manuscript was produced in the mid-fifteenth century, this focus on the Virgin likely had a polemic purpose, situating the manuscript in the context of debates over the Immaculate Conception, and using Alexander Nequams Expositio super Cantica canticorumto this end. In identifying the sources used, as well as the limits on the compiler imposed by the physical form of the roll, this examination of Gaster MS 2037 offers an insight into the later reception of this popular text.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

, failures, or points of controversy in the history of humanitarian action and thus differs from the self-serving institutional histories and forms of history marketing that put the ‘past glories’ ( Wylie, 2002 ) of such action front and center. But there is a certain value in a critical and independent focus. If today’s concerns over the humanitarian use of the image in terms of identity, reputation, and publicity are legitimate, a critical historical perspective helps to deepen understanding of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Framework for Measuring Effectiveness in Humanitarian Response
Vincenzo Bollettino and Birthe Anders

militaries themselves, such as the US military in Iraq and Afghanistan, but also in countries not currently affected by active conflict, serves to ‘win the hearts and minds of local communities’, thus ultimately serving military strategic interests ( Kleinman and Bradbury, 2010 ). What they highlight here is essentially the fundamental difference between military aid and humanitarian aid: while both provide aid to people in need, military aid very rarely does so in a neutral and impartial manner, but always with a strategic objective behind it, such as winning support for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action1
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

local cultures. 2 Examples include discourses that portray gender-based violence (GBV) as cultural practice ( Ward, 2002 : 9) and gender equality programming as ‘akin to “social engineering” and [going] against cultural norms’ ( IASC, 2006 : 1). While acknowledging the importance of respect for the cultures and values of local communities when serving them, I argue that transforming certain gender norms and related cultural practices is essential to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs