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Frances Rose-Troup
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Andrew James Johnston

This article investigates how Chaucer‘s Knight‘s and Squire‘s tales critically engage with the Orientalist strategies buttressing contemporary Italian humanist discussions of visual art. Framed by references to crusading, the two tales enter into a dialogue focusing, in particular, on the relations between the classical, the scientific and the Oriental in trecento Italian discourses on painting and optics, discourses that are alluded to in the description of Theseus Theatre and the events that happen there. The Squire‘s Tale exhibits what one might call a strategic Orientalism designed to draw attention to the Orientalism implicit in his fathers narrative, a narrative that, for all its painstaking classicism, displays both remarkably Italianate and Orientalist features. Read in tandem, the two tales present a shrewd commentary on the exclusionary strategies inherent in the construction of new cultural identities, arguably making Chaucer the first postcolonial critic of the Renaissance.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Contemporary environmental crisis fiction and the post-theory era
Louise Squire

2 ‘I am not afraid to die’: contemporary environmental crisis fiction and the post-theory era Louise Squire For an evanescent moment within the history of the Earth, Homo sapiens sought its own exclusion from the laws of the universe. No matter the wider cost, humanity would overcome its mortal limitations. The outcome, however, of this refusal to die – this rejection of natural laws – turns out to be death itself, since the abuses of planetary resources upon which death denial relies cause the promise of death to rebound upon humanity. Or as Claire Colebrook

in Extending ecocriticism
Open Access (free)
Judith Squires

S. Kemp and J. Squires (eds), Feminisms (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 188–93; G. Lloyd, The Man of Reason: ‘Male’ and ‘Female’ in Western Philosophy (London, Methuen, 1984). 9 D. Bubeck, Care, Gender and Justice (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1995); J.B. Elshtain, Public Man, Private Woman: Women in Social and

in Political concepts
Open Access (free)
Sustainability, subject and necessity in Yann Martel’s Life of Pi
Louise Squire

12 Circles unrounded: sustainability, subject and necessity in Yann Martel’s Life of Pi Louise Squire Yann Martel’s Man Booker Prize-winning Life of Pi (2002 [2001]) depicts the story of Pi, a boy who finds himself stranded on a lifeboat in the vast Pacific Ocean with a Bengal tiger. Having grown up in the setting of his family’s zoo in Pondicherry, Pi is faced with the loss of his family, who – on their way to a new start in Canada – go down with the ship, along with the remaining zoo animals. The central storyline, located in part 2 of the novel, is that of

in Literature and sustainability
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Reclaiming migration: voices from Europe’s ‘migrant crisis’
Vicki Squire, Nina Perkowski, Dallal Stevens, and Nick Vaughan-Williams

critical in assessing an approach that is otherwise skewed towards dominant perceptions regarding the interests and preferences of more settled EU populations. It is thus to the contested politics of testimony that this book turns. The contested politics of testimony Reclaiming Migration undertakes a critique of the EU's preventative policy agenda on the basis of a detailed qualitative analysis of the testimonies of people on the move across the Mediterranean Sea by boat (see Squire et al., 2017 ). More

in Reclaiming migration
Vicki Squire, Nina Perkowski, Dallal Stevens, and Nick Vaughan-Williams

route from Libya to Sicily or Malta, however, journeys took between three months and twenty-six years, with many lasting more than one year (see Squire et al., 2017 : 58). Some had left their own countries many years previously, and had lived for considerable periods in countries such as Libya, Sudan, Dubai, Lebanon, Jordan or Turkey before being driven to embark on the next stage of their migratory journey. Furthermore, those who had been in the EU for a considerable period – for example in Malta – had different experiences; some saw themselves as relatively settled

in Reclaiming migration
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Vicki Squire, Nina Perkowski, Dallal Stevens, and Nick Vaughan-Williams

’ that is grounded in the act of desertion (Squire, 2020b ). The work of Mezzadra is insightful here, in suggesting that ‘desertion, as a figure of civil disobedience, has been almost a privileged way to subjectivity, a road to freedom and independence’ (Mezzadra, 2004 : 267). While the various testimonies of people we interviewed suggest that this may be a rather optimistic and somewhat limited view of escape, it is also worth recalling the ambivalence of desertion as a concept and practice that not only involves an act of abandonment, but also an act of refusal or

in Reclaiming migration
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Vicki Squire, Nina Perkowski, Dallal Stevens, and Nick Vaughan-Williams

responsive approach, allowing participants to ‘speak back’ to the research and to share their experiences in a participatory way. This renders the project findings unique in the sense that the qualitative data produced is not replicable or standardised, but instead represents a reflexive engagement between the research team and research participants (see also Squire et al. 2017 ). 4 Our work is influenced by participatory traditions of qualitative research, which seek to involve

in Reclaiming migration
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Precarity, justice, postcoloniality
Vicki Squire, Nina Perkowski, Dallal Stevens, and Nick Vaughan-Williams

a form of epistemic violence that precisely relies on claims to justice remaining hidden . Epistemic violence, as it is understood here, is not separate from forms of violence that are structural (e.g. Davies et al., 2017 ) or that operate in physical and material terms (e.g. Squire, 2015a ). Rather, we understand epistemic violence to be integral to long-standing legacies of violence that are bound up with recurring colonial relations and dynamics (see Chapter 2 ). That these legacies and their current manifestations are hidden in debates about migration

in Reclaiming migration