Diaspora remixed in the urban jungle

This chapter examines the emergence of jungle, the first original black musical culture in London. It discusses the relation of jungle both to rave and to the Black Atlantic traditions of reggae, hip hop and soul, and argues that jungle can be thought of as both a distinct black British musical form and as articulating a particular form of multicultural politics. It explores the emergence of jungle from the ‘ardkore circuits of East London in the way 1990s, and the approach to technology that links it with wider black Atlantic practice.

in It’s a London thing
Abstract only
Music and the multicultural city

This chapter places the music scenes the book has discussed in the context of the politics of space and music in contemporary London. It considers the rise of the ‘plutocratic’ city’ in the early 21st century, and considers the emergences of subsequent music genres of grime, drill and new London jazz in terms of what they tell us about the contemporary state of London multiculture.

in It’s a London thing
Brixton acid and rave

This chapter discusses the emergence of acid house, a new form of club culture in the city, which reorganises London clubs culture and eventually that of the whole UK. This involves a critical discussion of the ‘Ibiza myth’, the conventional way in which rave is understood, examination of the racial politics of the acid house movement and shifts the focus onto the cultural work of black Londoners who have been excluded from the story of rave. This chapter also discusses the complex racial politics of house music and critically assesses rave claims to have transcended divisions of race, class and gender.

in It’s a London thing
Abstract only
London’s racial geography, 1960–80

This chapter provides an historical account of the racialisation of London in the post-war period, with particular focus on Caribbean migration, the “re-racialisation” of the city, the forms of spatial discipline – like sus – which militated against multiculture and the way leisure, including pubs and football were racialised spaces from which black youth was excluded. In the context of this exclusion the chapter discusses the emergence of the semi-autonomous black colony and the role reggae sound systems and Notting Hill Carnival played in providing the sites and resources for the emergence of new kinds of black British culture. The chapter also focuses on the emergence of multiculture in London space- at schools, and in the mixed musical cultures of soul.

in It’s a London thing
Abstract only
London’s sonic space

This chapter introduces the main book themes: dance music cultures in London in the 1980s and 90s and their relation to multiculture. Introducing some of the key ideas around the relationship between space and music (eg Lefebvre) and the politics of multiculturalism this chapter discusses some of the historical background to the idea of London as a Black Metropolis, the role black musical genres have played in the city and the how London has functioned as key site in Black Atlantic culture

in It’s a London thing
How rare groove, acid house and jungle remapped the city

This book discusses the emergence in London of three specific dance music multicultures in the context of the racialised city. Focusing on rare groove, acid house and jungle it places the emergence of these multi-racial music cultures in the context of theories of space and the historical forces which racialised the city in the late 20th century. Based on a wide range of original interviews with cultural producers – DJs, promoters, producers and dancers - undertaken over 20 years, read alongside cultural theory and contemporary accounts, it argues that music and the practices of space around music have been a crucial way in which racial segregation has been challenged and multiculture has emerged in London.

Using Henri Lefebvre’s notion of ‘diverting’ space this chapter analyses the emergence of warehouse parties in the mid-1980s, self-organised club culture in abandoned industrial buildings in the city, and the kinds of culture which emerged there. It discusses the context in which they emerged, the main innovators and the changes in club culture which drove the warehouse phenomenon. It also analyses the genre of rare groove - American soul and funk of the 1970s – which dominated the warehouse parties and discusses some of the key innovations of the era in terms of race and gender, particularly the activity of black women.

in It’s a London thing
Abstract only
A genre comes into its own

This chapter explores how the mobile camerawork of Z Cars (BBC, 1962–1978), compared to the conservative visuals and ideology of Dixon of Dock Green (BBC, 1955–1976), enabled the programme to uncover the emerging cracks in the postwar consensus. It argues that establishing the British police series as a permanent fixture of the television schedule was underscored by a new candid form of social realism devoted to the stresses of working-class men’s experiences.

in You’re nicked
Abstract only
An action-fuelled filmic decade?

This comparative analysis of Hunter’s Walk (ITV, 1973–1976) in relation to The Sweeney (ITV, 1975–1978) explores in what manner each series was able to engage in debates surrounding class- and gender-inequality in light of second-wave feminism and the fracturing postwar settlement. The chapter inspects how each series negotiated a changing public and political attitude towards crime invested in a deterrence doctrine.

in You’re nicked
Abstract only
Emergent feminist thought and resurgent video cameras

This chapter explores how Juliet Bravo (BBC, 1980–1985), The Gentle Touch (ITV, 1980–1984), and The Bill (ITV, 1984–2010) use video cameras and the rhetoric of melodrama to negotiate the disconnect thought to exist between the British police force’s increasingly militaristic practices and the public’s favouring of community policing. The analysis considers how each series interacts with contemporary rational-actor models of criminology in relation to this socio-political disparity. Moreover, the chapter determines how each series intervenes in debates surrounding class identity and gender roles in relation to Thatcherism: the political philosophy committed to reasserting Victorian values and displacing the responsibilities of the State on to individuals to decrease Government spending.

in You’re nicked