Art, Architecture and Visual Culture

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Ruth Pelzer-Montada

Readers are encouraged to create their own map, or temporal and thematic trajectory through the material presented in this volume, and find the connections between different texts that are pertinent to them. By referring to the further reading lists at the end of each section, readers are then able to create a diverse, yet interconnected web of multiple intersecting lines that lead beyond the book itself.

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Ruth Pelzer-Montada

Readers are encouraged to create their own map, or temporal and thematic trajectory through the material presented in this volume, and find the connections between different texts that are pertinent to them. By referring to the further reading lists at the end of each section, readers are then able to create a diverse, yet interconnected web of multiple intersecting lines that lead beyond the book itself.

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Ruth Pelzer-Montada

Readers are encouraged to create their own map, or temporal and thematic trajectory through the material presented in this volume, and find the connections between different texts that are pertinent to them. By referring to the further reading lists at the end of each section, readers are then able to create a diverse, yet interconnected web of multiple intersecting lines that lead beyond the book itself.

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Ruth Pelzer-Montada

Readers are encouraged to create their own map, or temporal and thematic trajectory through the material presented in this volume, and find the connections between different texts that are pertinent to them. By referring to the further reading lists at the end of each section, readers are then able to create a diverse, yet interconnected web of multiple intersecting lines that lead beyond the book itself.

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking

This unique anthology presents thirty-two texts on contemporary prints and printmaking written from the mid-1980s to the present. The essays range from academic art history to popular art criticism and creative writing; taken together, they form a critical topography of printmaking today.

The book’s four sections provide: A genealogy of printmaking and print culture; A sample of debates on contemporary printmaking, beginning with Ruth Weisberg’s influential ‘The syntax of print’ (1986); A range of critical terms and themes; Examples of some of the major spheres of print activity, such as production, collecting, dissemination, education and research

Drawing on a cast of distinguished scholars, artists and curators, the book makes available a selection of widely dispersed and difficult-to-find texts. This includes extracts from works not yet available in English, such as Die Welt als T-Shirt (1997) by Beat Wyss and La Ressemblance par contact (2008) by Georges Didi-Huberman. There are also contributions from scholar and book artist Johanna Drucker, mathematician and computer artist Frieder Nake, curators Daniel F. Herrmann, Gill Saunders and Mari Carmen Ramírez, and the editors of the award-winning website Printeresting.

Featuring an overall introduction by the editor, as well as introductions to each of the sections, the anthology is aimed at an audience of international stakeholders in the field of contemporary prints, printmaking and print media, ranging from art students and practising artists to museum curators, critics, educationalists and scholars. It provides the basis for an expansion of the debate in the field and a starting point for further research.

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Frances Robertson

In the last chapter of her book Print Culture, Frances Robertson asks whether the widespread assertion of the ‘death of print’, that is, its displacement by digital technologies and media forms, is accurate. Indeed have the texts and images that we encounter daily become as dematerialised as is constantly argued?

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Sheryl Conkelton

Sheryl Conkelton’s text illuminates print’s historic disseminating role increating and sustaining public discourse. It was written for Philagrafika, the 2009/10 biennale in Philadelphia, USA (see essay by Roca in Part II). Conkelton also charts the changes to public discourse, especially in the twenty-first century: not only has it become global, but the public sphere is no longer conceived as the uniform, monolithic space of old. Instead, it encompasses different local, if overlapping experiences, by multiple publics.

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
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The future is queer
Richard Harding

Australian artist and educator Richard Harding explores print’s position within contemporary art through the socio-political notion, developed in the context of postcolonial and queer theory, of ‘otherness’. Viewed through the lens of identity and gender politics, print’s matrixial and reproductive nature and its lack of ‘originality’ result in its ‘queer’ position within art’s medium hierarchy.

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
The mechanisation of memory
Frieder Nake

One of the earliest computer artists, German Frieder Nake, reflects on the differences between two different types of print matrix, both frequently used by contemporary printmakers – often in the same work of art. These are the physical plate or screen that serve as matrix on the one hand and the digital ‘pixel’ matrix on the other.

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
Narrative and structure
Jeremy Lewison

Production and dissemination are closely intertwined, especially for a private print publisher. Jeremy Lewinson’s text – written in the 1990s – gives an insight into this important commercial model of print activity by focusing on the equally crucial format of the print portfolio. It charts the establishment of British print publisher Charles Booth-Clibborn’s Paragon Press.

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking