Art, Architecture and Visual Culture

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Kent Fedorowich

The theme of anglicisation is a familiar one throughout late eighteenth and early nineteenth century British imperial history. Anglicisation was revived after the second Anglo-Boer War, motivated this time by the British government's attempt to foster white racial harmony and create a new rural order in South Africa. The politicisation of South African soldier settlement was not, however, centred on the conflict between the dominion government and veterans' organisations for participation in and control of post-war policy. Nationalist politicians saw the development of irrigation schemes as the country's salvation and the solution to the poor white problem. Throughout 1917 and 1918 the South African government remained resolute in its determination not to introduce special soldier settlement projects, state-aided migration programmes or participate in an imperial free passage scheme. The founding in 1920 of the 1820 Association marked a new chapter in British immigration to South Africa.

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Edited by: J.W.M. Hichberger

This chapter shows that the Prince Regent's desire to appropriate the Peninsular, Trafalgar and Waterloo victories, resulted in patronage for a genre of battle painting not legitimised by the tenets of academic theory. The Prince Regent's decision to display Lawrence's portraits rather than his battle paintings for his Waterloo gallery has been noted. One High Art form of military painting which had flourished in England in the late eighteenth century was the exemplum virtutis painting such as Benjamin West's Death of General Wolfe or John Singleton Copely's Death of Major Peirson. The British Institution (BI) for Promoting the Fine Arts in the United Kingdom, had been formed in May 1805 by important members of the Royal Academy and members of the aristocracy who were patrons and amateurs of art. The aristocratic connoisseurs of the BI showed themselves out of sympathy with the majority of urban middle-class art consumers.