Film, Media and Music

Abstract only
Shit shags and crap hotels
DJ Paulette

This chapter is DJ Paulette’s brief confessional on how she got up to all sorts, good and bad, while DJ’ing. While she loved high-end service, she didn’t love hotels, as they are just rooms that other people have slept and behaved badly in. She took two months off from DJ’ing to sit her finals and concentrate on presenting the TV programme Juice. She then learned that she had a low tolerance for drugs: prescription and illegal. DJ Paulette relates her adventures: her road trips, driving cars the wrong way, the media’s encouragement of bad behaviour, her first dab of brown MDMA from a vintage powder compact, and the least favourite leg of her drugs journey. Occasionally, she would leave the DJ booth to dance or vibe with the crowd. Loneliness, a hangover, beer glasses, bad decisions and an early journey were never a good combination.

in Welcome to the club
DJ Paulette

Manchester legend DJ Paulette discusses women’s secret legacy and women’s rights-related issues in this chapter. She reveals that she was prepared for the world, mentored by right-on feminists. Through them she learned that independent, multiskilled and mature people are Swiss Army-knife useful and a valued member of any team. DJ Paulette and her friends, tired of questions concerning the gendered challenge of being capable of doing anything, gathered together to dissect and examine the issues, stereotypical attitudes, and the standard female DJ interview questions. One of the biggest influences and role models to DJs and record label executives was Strictly Rhythm’s Gladys Pizarro, who, from 1989, took the world of independent record labels, branding, licensing and A&R to another level. From The BRITS to BIMM, from Point Blank College to Future DJs, professional and academic coaching and extracurricular involvement is now a respectable path to follow.

in Welcome to the club
Abstract only
In the beginning
DJ Paulette

The nineties were not time for anyone Black in the centre of Manchester. Changing minds and challenging attitudes was the calling card of every woman of colour. DJ Paulette worked an androgynous persona and exuded a fierce attitude that stood out from the smiley culture, flowing locks and baggy rave style. Her activism snapped into focus when she signed up to present Loud and Proud alongside Boy George and The Word’s Hufty, the first gay magazine programme to be broadcast on national radio. She had became a celebrity with features in i-D, The Face, Mixmag and DJ Magazine and lead articles in the Manchester Evening News and City Life. She co-presented a show on BBC Radio 1, was namechecked in liner notes for Kinky Trax house-music compilations and presented a popular TV programme on Granada TV. She followed her passion and the path less travelled to become a full-time DJ.

in Welcome to the club
Abstract only
DJ Paulette

In this chapter, examines the hard graft and disagreements with bookers and bar managers over equipment, conditions and pay. She explains how why and how her life went from wonderland to warzone and discusses the importance of planning one’s career. Killing a DJ does not require the employment of an expensive hitman. Keyboard warriors can achieve it with an itchy send finger, aided by the ensuing social media circus and cancel culture. The most painful death anyone can experience is the hung, drawn and quartered torture of their support network collapsing. DJ Magazine and Mixmag created two, groundbreaking magazine events that will stand as an incriminating reflection of the times and celebration of the Black electronic music culture with their Dance Music Is Black Music and Blackout issues. As a Black artist in a majority white environment, she knows how important it is to keep one’s profile high.

in Welcome to the club
Abstract only
Welcome to the club (Belleville or Bust)
DJ Paulette

This introduction presents DJ Paulette’s highs, lows and lessons of her thirty-year music career. DJ Paulette presents a remarkable view of the music industry from a Black woman’s perspective. DJ’ing made it possible for her to move to London and make a career out of working in the music industry, mentored by some of the best in the business. According to her, the music industry is not without its issues or disadvantages. There are so few Black and female role models behind the decks or in the boardrooms, and this needs to be addressed. There is an undercurrent of racism and sexism, while stories of misconduct are only now starting to come to light. This book is a heartfelt, hilarious and frustrating account of DJ Paulette’s own story, spanning the scenes she has inhabited, the characters she has encountered and the many twists and turns of her career.

in Welcome to the club
Abstract only
A manifesto
DJ Paulette

In this chapter, Manchester legend DJ Paulette relates how she has evolved and grown. She discusses the awards won, seats earned, her music bibles, as well as her broadcasting, mentoring and teaching. She explains how she has been living authentically and unapologetically in her Blackness. This book is a thank you and an appreciation of the magnificent mavericks, the courageous chancers, the happy hustlers and the resilient ravers and rovers who have dedicated their lives to honing their craft, spreading the message of peace, love, unity and respect, touching lives, making stars and evolving this culture for others to enjoy. Representing every voice and every experience is essential if we are to project a more balanced image of club and DJ history into the global consciousness and historical canon. For aspiring DJs, she advises to dream big, follow tutorials, make contacts and get involved.

in Welcome to the club
Abstract only
Eurostar
DJ Paulette

While DJ Paulette played tracks and remixes from The Young Disciples, Galliano and Incognito in her DJ sets, she never dreamed that she would work for the label or with the legendary Gilles Peterson or Norman Jay MBE (two of her DJ heroes). Marcia Carr was her first Black female DJ friend outside of Manchester and the first woman DJ to be actively supportive of her in London. After she moved to Paris, she clocked up at least 2,000 gigs, many air and TGV miles and 460 radio shows. 2010 was one of Wagram’s biggest selling CDs. DJ Paulette released four compilation albums for Fashion TV and became one of their International Tour residents appearing in Bangkok, Egypt, Morocco, Kuala Lumpur, South Africa and all over France. When she left Paris for Ibiza, Cherie FM produced a short-form documentary on her leaving.

in Welcome to the club
Abstract only
DJ Paulette

In this chapter, DJ Paulette explores the journey through the pandemic with the people and organisations she worked with who refused to surrender in the face of this invisible assailant. On 11 March, the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a global pandemic due to the rapid spread and severity of cases around the world. The clamour and the noise of peers, DJs and the entire arts and events industry collectively panicking and shifting their lives online overwhelmed her. Her first lockdown radio mixes for Reform Radio, BBC 6 Music and Worldwide FM were hampered by inexperience, inefficient equipment and living on a main road. When lockdown ended there was a real appetite for events. Resident Advisor reported that there were 66 per cent more live outdoor events than pre-lockdown. Music was her shield, therapy was her sword.

in Welcome to the club
Abstract only
The life and lessons of a Black woman DJ
Author:

This book is a heartfelt and at times hilarious and frustrating account of DJ Paulette’s thirty-year music career. She spans the scenes she has inhabited, the characters she has encountered and the many twists and turns and ups and downs of her career. DJ Paulette, a Black queer woman, breaks through the gates of the boys’ clubs, enduring the knock-backs and fighting for a seat at the table. As a foremother to all women, she has tirelessly worked to share her passion for music with the world, and has become a doyen of DJ culture. She has worked in radio stations, record labels, magazines, recording studios and, most powerfully, and in DJ booths. Paulette relates how electronic dance music and the associated media experienced a whitewashing that was extreme in its execution. She discusses Flesh, the Haçienda years and the Haçienda renaissance with the people at the sharp end of operations: Paul Cons, Peter Hook, Luke Howard, Kath McDermott and Ang Matthews. Paulette examines the chaotic rupture caused by hard graft, and disagreements with bookers and bar managers over equipment, conditions and pay. She relates why and how her life went from wonderland to warzone. Paulette also discusses women’s secret legacy, women’s rights-related issues and the importance of planning one’s career. Finally, she explores the journey through the pandemic with the people and organisations she worked with who refused to surrender in the face of this invisible assailant.

Abstract only
Social, political and cultural influences on British folk horror, urban wyrd and backwoods cinema
Andy Paciorek

The term ‘folk horror’ has been used to refer to horror that most frequently has strong rural, occult and sometimes folkloric elements. Whilst discussion has unearthed examples of ‘folk horror’ from numerous different nations, the designation is most strongly associated with a limited number of British films and other media in the late 1960s to mid-1970s. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the socio-political and wider cultural factors of this period within the UK and explore how they may have influenced and/or inspired this particular mode of cinema. From there we look at the revival of ‘folk horror’ and its growth in stature and status within the 21st century and again consider the influence that the contemporary social, political, cultural and perhaps environmental situation has had upon its resurgence. In this exploration we pay strong attention to films of both the psychedelic era and of the current folk horror revival but also consider folk horror in relation to sub-genres or modes like hauntology, urban wyrd and backwoods horror. We explore the cultural climate that the first wave of British folk horror arose in and question why it has again taken root and grown more vigorously now.

in Folk horror on film