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Leonie Hannan and Sarah Longair

There is a potentially bewildering array of sources for historical material culture research – this chapter explains in detail the potentials and the pitfalls of using different kinds of repositories and also where to locate material in a range of environments including museums, galleries, historic houses and institutions. The chapter provides a step-by-step guide to using museum documentation to locate relevant collections and also discusses online catalogues, which are commonly a first port of call for the material culture researcher.

in History through material culture
Leonie Hannan and Sarah Longair

This chapter highlights how careful and rigorous thinking through of the research questions at an early stage gives confidence in the methodology and justification for using the object or collection as key primary sources. This chapter will show how object-specific questions create important and vital studies in and of themselves, but also how they can contribute to overarching research questions with wider historical significance.

in History through material culture
Author: Zheng Yangwen

Ten Lessons tells the story of modern China from the eve of the First Opium War to the Xi Jinping era. This was a most turbulent period of time as the Middle Kingdom was torn apart by opium, Christianity, modernisation, imperialists, nationalists, warlords and the Japanese, and as China reinvented and reasserted itself on the world stage in the post-Mao era. Unlike the handful of existing textbooks, which narrate without primary sources and without engaging with academic debate, Ten Lessons is devoted to students, from university to high school, as it uses extensive primary sources to tell the story of modern China and introduces them to scholarship and debates in the field of Chinese history and beyond. This will help students understand the real issues involved, navigate their way through the maze of existing literature and undertake independent research for essays and dissertations. The book also points out gaps and inadequacies in the existing scholarship, to encourage postgraduate studies. It is ‘mental furniture’ for the increasing army of journalists, NGO workers, diplomats, government officials, businesspeople and travellers of all kinds, who often need a good source of background information before they head to China.

Abstract only
Leonie Hannan and Sarah Longair

This chapter guides researchers through the writing up process. While much of this advice will apply generally to historical writing, this chapter pays particular attention to specific skills and conventions associated with writing about material culture – the use of images and diagrams, appropriate referencing styles and acknowledgements. The chapter discusses writing about material culture in different contexts, for example dissertations and theses as well as object labels and blog posts.

in History through material culture
Rob Boddice

This chapter introduces the three principal theoretical frameworks for doing the history of emotions – emotional communities, emotional regimes, and emotional styles – each of which in turn is associated with a particular scholar: Barbara Rosenwein, William Reddy, Peter Stearns. The chapter also includes a critical review of ‘emotionology’ and ‘emotives’, ‘emotional refuges’ and ‘emotional suffering’.

in The history of emotions
Abstract only
Rob Boddice

The conclusion appraises the potential future of the history of emotions, looking at the methodological, linguistic and disciplinary barriers to the development of the field. This focuses in particular on the opportunities available to re-cast traditional historical periodisation and on the need to reach out to the neurosciences, not merely to borrow, but also to lend substantial historical insight into what emotions are. The book ends with a section on teaching and on the necessity for students of history to practice the history of emotions.

in The history of emotions
Rob Boddice

This chapter argues for the full integration of the history of the senses within the history of emotions. The senses are shown to be contingent and historical, and directly tied to a broader conceptual language of ‘feeling’. The chapter explores the connection of sensation and evaluation, focusing on the particular questions of callousness and pain. New historical methods are sought via contemporary brain- and neuroscience. This culminates in an attempt at rapprochement between the history of emotions and neurohistory, with exciting possibilities for the inclusion of genetics and epigenetics in historical analysis.

in The history of emotions
Rob Boddice

An overview of the historiography of emotions that makes a call for the historicisation of the human being. The chapter emphasises the history of emotions component to the narratives of Thucydides and Michelet, before finding a programme for the history of emotions in the early years of the discipline of psychology. The chapter also details the flirtation of the Annales school with emotions, and the components of psychohistory that might yet be salvaged. It concludes by appraising the historiographical turn to the neurosciences, and the range of available sources that allow us to practice the history of emotions.

in The history of emotions
Author: Rob Boddice

The history of emotions is the first accessible textbook on the theories, methods, achievements, and problems in this burgeoning field of historical inquiry. Historians of emotion borrow heavily from the disciplines of anthropology, psychology, philosophy and neuroscience, and stake out a claim that emotions have a past and change over time. This book introduces students and professional historians to the main areas of concern in the history of emotions, discussing how the emotions intersect with other lines of historical research relating to power, practice, society and morality. Providing a narrative of historical emotions concepts, the book is the go-to handbook for understanding the problems of interpreting historical experience, collating and evaluating all the principal methodological tools generated and used by historians of emotion. It also lays out an historiographical map of emotions history research in the past and present, and sets the agenda for the future of the history of emotions. Chiefly centring on the rapprochement of the humanities and the neurosciences, the book proposes a way forward in which disciplinary lines become blurred. Addressing criticism from both within and without the discipline of history, The history of emotions offers a rigorous defence of this new approach, demonstrating its potential to lie at the centre of historiographical practice, as well as the importance of this kind of historical work for our general understanding of the human brain and the meaning of human experience.

Abstract only
Rob Boddice

The introduction puts forward the book's main claims. 1. Emotions change over time: that is to say, emotions are as much the subject of historical enquiry as anything else. 2. Emotions are not merely the effect of historical circumstances, expressed in the aftermath of events, but are active causes of events and richly enhance historiographical theories of causation. 3. Emotions are at the centre of the history of the human being, considered as a biocultural entity that is characterised as a worlded body, in worlds of other worlded bodies. 4. Emotions are at the centre of the history of morality, for it is becoming increasingly unlikely that any account of human virtue, morals or ethics can be devoid of an analysis of its historical emotional context. Taken together, the history of emotions is therefore putting the emotions at the centre of historiographical practice.

in The history of emotions