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Laura Cahillane

The conclusion considers the overall reasons for the demise of the constitution and the fact that the project as a whole should not be considered a failure. There are important lessons still to be learned from the document and the immensity of the project should be acknowledged.

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Laura Cahillane

This chapter focuses on the fact that the constitution was intended to be a document for the people. The sovereign and democratic nature of the document is considered as well as various devices included in the constitution to reinforce that theme. Various constitutional provisions are examined in practice and the reasons for their removal are analysed.

Open Access (free)

Sidi NDiaye

This article describes the brutalisation of the bodies of Tutsi and Jewish victims in 1994 and during the Second World War, respectively, and contrasts the procedures adopted by killers to understand what these deadly practices say about the imaginaries at work in Rwanda and Poland. Dealing with the infernalisation of the body, which eventually becomes a form of physical control, this comparative work examines the development of groups and communities of killers in their particular social and historical context. Different sources are used, such as academic works, reports from victims organisations and non-governmental organisations, books, testimonies and film documentaries.

Open Access (free)

T.K. Ralebitso-Senior, T.J.U. Thompson and H.E. Carney

In the mid-1990s, the crime scene toolkit was revolutionised by the introduction of DNA-based analyses such as the polymerase chain reaction, low copy number DNA analysis, short-tandem repeat typing, pulse-field gel electrophoresis and variable number tandem repeat. Since then, methodological advances in other disciplines, especially molecular microbial ecology, can now be adapted for cutting-edge applications in forensic contexts. Despite several studies and discussions, there is, however, currently very little evidence of these techniques adoption at the contemporary crime scene. Consequently, this article discusses some of the popular omics and their current and potential exploitations in the forensic ecogenomics of body decomposition in a crime scene. Thus, together with published supportive findings and discourse, knowledge gaps are identified. These then justify the need for more comprehensive, directed, concerted and global research towards state-of-the-art microecophysiology method application and/or adaptation for subsequent successful exploitations in this additional context of microbial forensics.

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Laura Cahillane

This chapter builds on the conclusions reached at the end of the last chapter by attempting to discover whether the failures of the constitution were caused by defects in the constitutional design of by the treatment of the document post-enactment and also to demonstrate the continuing importance of the 1922 experience. Two important provisions are concentrated upon; the amendment provision and the judicial review provision.

Open Access (free)

Andrea M. Szkil

The subject of forensic specialist‘s work with human remains in the aftermath of conflict has remained largely unexplored within the existing literature. Drawing upon anthropological fieldwork conducted from 2009–10 in three mortuary facilities overseen by the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), this article analyses observations of and interviews with ICMP forensic specialists as a means of gaining insight into their experiences with the remains of people who went missing during the 1992–95 war in BiH. The article specifically focuses on how forensic specialists construct and maintain their professional identities within an emotionally charged situation. Through analysing forensic specialists encounters with human remains, it is argued that maintaining a professional identity requires ICMP forensic specialists to navigate between emotional attachment and engagement according to each situation.

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Laura Cahillane

The introduction explains the aim of the book.

Open Access (free)

Ernesto Schwartz-Marin and Arely Cruz-Santiago

The article will present the findings of ethnographic research into the Colombian and Mexican forensic systems, introducing the first citizen-led exhumation project made possible through the cooperation of scholars, forensic specialists and interested citizens in Mexico. The coupling evolution and mutual re-constitution of forensic science will be explored, including new forms of citizenship and nation building projects – all approached as lived experience – in two of Latin America‘s most complex contexts: organised crime and mass death.

Open Access (free)

Élisabeth Anstett, Jean-Marc Dreyfus and Caroline Fournet

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Laura Cahillane

This chapter goes beyond any existing scholarship by providing, for the first time, a detailed consideration of the three original drafts of the constitution. While these drafts were published in the 1970s, they have never been examined or analysed in detail. Here the three documents are considered in depth under a number of headings and their provisions are compared and contrasted.